Up from Slavery: An Autobiography

Up from Slavery: An Autobiography

by Booker T. Washington
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Overview

Up from Slavery: An Autobiography by Booker T. Washington

Booker T. Washington, the most recognized national leader, orator and educator, emerged from slavery in the deep south, to work for the betterment of African Americans in the post Reconstruction period.

"Up From Slavery" is an autobiography of Booker T. Washington’s life and work, which has been the source of inspiration for all Americans. Washington reveals his inner most thoughts as he transitions from ex-slave to teacher and founder of one of the most important schools for African Americans in the south, The Tuskegee Industrial Institute.

Booker T. Washington’s words are profound. Washington includes the address he gave at the Atlanta Cotton States and International Exposition in 1895, which made him a national figure. He imparts ‘gems of wisdom’ throughout the book, which are relevant to Americans who aspire to achieve great attainments in life.

Listeners will appreciate the impassioned delivery of the reader, Andrew L. Barnes. Legacy Audio is proud to present this audio book production of "Up From Slavery" by Booker T. Washington.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781442945449
Publisher: ReadHowYouWant
Publication date: 07/13/2009
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
File size: 384 KB

About the Author

Booker Taliaferro Washington, the educator and racial spokesman who remains one of the most controversial figures in African-American history, was born into slavery on a tobacco farm in Franklin County, Virginia, on April 5, 1856. His mother was the plantation's cook; his father was an unknown white man. At the close of the Civil War, Washington moved with his mother and stepfather to the river town of Malden, West Virginia, where he toiled in coal mines and salt furnaces, securing a basic education in his spare time. Later he worked as a houseboy for Mrs. Viola Ruffner, a New England woman who recognized his eagerness to advance himself. In 1872 Washington returned to Virginia to enroll in the Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute, a vocational school for blacks founded by Samuel Chapman Armstrong, a former Union general. Washington graduated with honors in 1875. Afterward, he taught school in Malden and briefly attended the Wayland Seminary in Washington, D.C., before accepting an invitation from General Armstrong to join the faculty at Hampton.

In 1881 Washington left Virginia for Alabama, to establish the Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute. The school opened on July 4, 1881, with one teacher and thirty pupils. Through skillful management, tireless fund-raising, and shrewd diplomacy with whites, he built Tuskegee, literally brick by brick, into the top black trade school in the country. Like his mentor, General Armstrong, Washington made sure that all skills and academic courses taught at Tuskegee had practical application in the economy of the postwar South. A pragmatist, not an idealist, he endorsed the Puritan virtue of self-help, maintaining, "the individual who can do something that the world wants done will, in the end, make his way regardless of his race."

Washington's well-known success as an educator led to his being asked to speak on racial issues. In 1895 he delivered opening remarks at the Cotton States and International Exposition in Atlanta. In the now-famous Atlanta Compromise Address, Washington urged blacks to postpone their demands for equal rights and focus instead on improving themselves through education, industriousness, and racial solidarity. "In all things that are purely social we can be as separate as the fingers, yet one as the hand in all things essential to mutual progress," he stated. The following year Washington became the first black to receive an honorary Master of Arts degree from Harvard University.

By 1900 Washington, the so-called "Wizard of Tuskegee," had emerged as America's most influential black leader. He launched the National Negro Business League in Boston and, in rapid succession, published two volumes of autobiography: The Story of My Life and Work (1900) and Up from Slavery (1901). William Dean Howells praised Up from Slavery in the North American Review, and Langston Hughes later deemed it "one of America's most revealing books." Washington created a storm of controversy, however, when he dined at the White House with President Theodore Roosevelt to discuss political appointments in the South.

In 1903 Washington's accommodationist position came under attack by W. E. B. Du Bois. In The Souls of Black Folk Du Bois wrote: "His doctrine has tended to make the whites, North and South, shift the burden of the Negro problem to the Negro's shoulders and stand aside as critical and rather pessimistic spectators; when in fact the burden belongs to the nation, and the hands of none of us are clean if we bend not our energies to righting these great wrongs." Soon Washington's leadership was challenged by the militant Niagara Movement, founded in 1905, and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, which succeeded it in 1910.

Washington maintained a grueling work schedule during his final years. He also toured Europe and brought out two last books, My Larger Education (1911) and The Man Farthest Down (1912). In November 1915, while visiting New York City on business, Washington was hospitalized. Realizing the gravity of his condition, he insisted on returning home. "I was born in the South, have lived all my life in the South, and expect to die and be buried in the South," he often said. Booker T. Washington arrived in Alabama by train only hours before his death on November 14, 1915. He was buried two days later in the small cemetery on the campus of the Tuskegee Institute.

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Up From Slavery 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 84 reviews.
Father_of_5_Boys More than 1 year ago
I had heard often of Booker T. Washington and of his work at Tuskegee Institute, but never really knew much about him beyond just the name recognition. This autobiography was a good way to find out more about him, his life, and his philosophies - most all of which I agree with and think we could use more of these days (both black and white people). The one criticism I have of the book is that the introduction by Louis Harlan is very long and I think would be better as an Epilogue. I found myself reading it going "o.k., o.k., just let me read the book". I ended up going back and rereading a lot of the introduction again, which puts the book and Mr. Washington into historical context, when I was done. I would recommend just skipping the introduction and reading it when you are done with the book. - - It does offer some insights though.
R_Jay More than 1 year ago
When this book was converted to an ebook, the publisher didn't bother to check to see if the e-version was readable. Not all of the characters/letters were converted properly so there are numerous words on every page that can be barely read because the letters are jumbled or incorrect. The original book by Booker T. Washington was terrific, but if you want to read it, buy a different version. This one is terrible.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you want to know how adult education really ought to be taught, you should read Booker T. Washington's autobiography "Up from Slavery". He was one of the greatest educators in history. His methods and determination to provide a high quality education to older teens and young adults proved to be of great worth to many men and women of different ethnic backgrounds. He went beyond "book learning" and provided a means for his students to learn life's skills and how to be good citizens in a most difficult time period in our history. His model and style of education still applies today, and, if they were taken seriously, could solve many of of education issues. I highly recommend this book to anyone who has an interest in how education should really be.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good book for understading slavery. This is a 8th grade reading level book good to use as a book report.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
What a great story of a man who really believed that people needed to find a skill that made them feel useful and worthy. Very well written and I learned a lot about him.
wmarvel More than 1 year ago
The content of this book is riveting and hard to put down...but this nook version is so filled with errors and typos it is difficult to read. this by far is the worst nook edition i have encountered with regard to accuracy.
Bernimarie More than 1 year ago
I knew nothing about Booker T. Washington--until now! What a strong and determined man he was. He held no grudges and spent his entire life helping fellow African-Americans succeed, despite the odds against them at the time. He led an interesting life and made his way up from nothing to becoming a successful, world-renowned educator, orator, author and political leader. I highly recommend this book!
Anonymous 3 months ago
This book was very uplifting. A part of history that we all need to know about. It makes oneself proud to be an American, people of all color, races and creeds.
braintrusts More than 1 year ago
The author could just as easily have used his prescription for success for people today, as he did immediately after the Civil War. Booker T. Washington knew that the success of ex-slaves in this country was directly proportional to the level of education achieved. That education also included the interpersonal skills necessary to perform those skills in social settings. READ THIS BOOK!! You won't regret it. Talk to your school boards and make it mandatory reading in Middle Schools.
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This is an interesting book read l
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By lisa genova
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DO NOT BUY THIS. IT IS NOT THE WHOLE BOOK. IT IS JUST THE INTRODUCTION
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I am only giving it three stars because I have not read it, just wanted to say that there are many many of this book in the NOOK library, all titled "Up from Slavery". I do not know if this one is different, I just know that they are all pretty much the same title and all the same author.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Lots of Im famous but Im still humble. Although an important record its still a pitch article for funding in exchange for gritty rags-to-riches backstory.
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