Veiled at Midnight

Veiled at Midnight

by Christine Lindsay

Paperback

$14.99
View All Available Formats & Editions
Choose Expedited Shipping at checkout for guaranteed delivery by Friday, February 22

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781939023261
Publisher: WhiteFire Publishing
Publication date: 10/15/2014
Pages: 318
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.71(d)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Veiled at Midnight 4.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
MaureenST More than 1 year ago
This is book 3 in this series and now the characters we met in the first book Shadowed in Silk have grown up and are now working in India as the country is in riots and the British returning the rule of the country. We see mass murders and crimes against each other in the name of religion, heart breaking, and unfortunately it is still happening in our world. This is where Pakistan is in the making, and the muslins fighting to have their country without the rule of India. We are reminded of our beloved Miriam from the first book, and her namesake Miriam is helping with the casualties of this war. Her brother Cam, in British service along with her Dad, is fighting his deepest demon of alcohol, it has consumed his life, and we fear it will take his life. Dassah has also returned in this story and Cam is enamored with her, but can the stigma of races between them be over come? This is their story, along with the struggles and rioting going on around them. The conclusion to the Twilight of the British Raj series, and it is a compelling page-turning read. You will almost smell the flowers and the scents of the food cooking, the beautiful lakes and buildings, but what will be left after the British leave? Don’t miss this one it can be read alone, but you would be depriving yourself of similar historical and capturing reads. Enjoy! I was giving a copy of this book for my honest opinion and was not required to give a positive review.
amybooksy More than 1 year ago
Veiled at Midnight is the third installment to the Twilight of the British Raj series. I thought this story was great and my favorite of the series. Just like the cover, the historical details are beautifully written. I would highly recommend this book! 5 stars.
Running_Writer More than 1 year ago
Lindsay ranks as on of my favorite authors. She not only meticulously researched this book, but the struggles of her characters have the ability to transform the reader. The last in the Twilight of the Raj series, we see India torn into two countries--Pakistan and India. Faith rises against faith, neighbor against neighbor as the country struggles to survive. So too, we see, Dasssah and Cam's love torn apart by his drunken binge that leaves Dassah believing she is not married. Caught up in the turmoil of the country's chaos, their love, like India, struggles for survival. My recommendation is to start with the first book of the series. Read them all. Savor. Learn and be transported into the beautiful, literary world Lindsay creates.
Laura_Pol More than 1 year ago
The history that has been in this series was very fascinating, but especially in this one! I did not realize that India had such a tumultuous and at times sad history. I learned quite a bit of the unrest that was just among the Indian people during the time period Christine wrote in (even if this story was fictional). I really enjoyed the banter between Miriam and Jack! It brought such a light-heartedness that I desperately needed in this book. I felt this one had the most descriptive violence out of all three books and being pregnant I was really sensitive to it. There were also numerous positive Gospel messages that I can imagine almost any reader could relate too or be encouraged by. Overall this was a good final ending to the series! It was great to have Cam back and getting to know Miriam despite that it wasn't an easy journey for either one of them. *(I received this novel from the author in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts expressed are my own and I was not required to write a positive review.)*
AprilWG More than 1 year ago
There are only a handful of authors who write in the style I love most, and Christine is one of them. Sweeping, energetic, consuming, and oh so romantic, her stories get inside my head. They introduce me to new places, cultures, and event that embed themselves on my memory. I'd always known that Britain relinquished India some time in the last century, but I had no idea how devastating it was. Wow. If for no other reason, this book is a must to get an in-depth look at India and Pakistan's birthing pains. The characters, as usual, are endearing yet beautifully flawed, and the spiritual message is applicable and unapologetic. I must be honest and say there were passages in the middle that made me yawn, and I wondered when the action Christine is known for would begin. I doubted for a while there that I would see it, but my patience was rewarded. The story picked back up and swept me away to a triumphant end. Good job, Christine. Another home run.
DianaFlow More than 1 year ago
Once again Christine Lindsay sweeps the reader away on an exotic, riveting journey to faraway India -- a land of exquisite, mystical beauty, but one of extreme political and religious unrest as well. Ms. Lindsay's amazing descriptive imagery of this resplendent, beautiful country will awaken the readers' senses to the sights, smells, and allure of India...but her impeccable historical research describes the flip side of the coin as well. The atrocities and prejudices suffered by the Indian people under the guise of religion was heartbreaking, and I learned a lot about this horrendous era of India's history that I wasn't aware of. Add a seemingly futile, but breathtaking romance that transcends all racial barriers, and you have a powerful novel sure to be an award winner---that is nigh unto impossible to put down! I highly recommend reading all three novels in The Twilight of the British Raj, as this will go down as one of my "favorite ever" series of all times!  
AKMcGowan More than 1 year ago
Christine Lindsay's final installment in her Twilight of the British Raj series, Veiled at Midnight, is the perfect capstone to a lovely string of historical novels set in India during the end of British control. The author paints a striking picture using reds, greens and golds, mixed with the scents of jasmine and cloves, and the rich heritage of the Indian people and their struggle for freedom and then reconstruction. Her characters are deep and affected. Both Cam and Miriam strive to find a home as British citizens living in a foreign land, but truly the only land they've ever called home. Cam's personal struggles with alcoholism and subsequent loss of the love of his life because of alcohol abuse rings true and challenging. Meanwhile, his sister, Miriam, struggles to find her place in her theological teaching career, trapped between the religious powers at odds and her own doubts and insecurities that must be overcome. As with her other novels, the author has written a page turning, action and emotionally packed book. The character's colloquialisms and class/cultural separation of the period are perfect representations of a time past, but still hanging on today. As with any great historical novel, this book is like a time machine, transporting the reader to a vast, hot, beautiful country, and leaving them with a renewed respect for the people there and their struggles. And as with any great Christian novel, God plays the victor as each character travels their spiritual journey set before them. When the novel came to a close, I caught a whiff of curry, of wild rose, and felt completely satisfied. I will always treasure this 'trip' to India.
rquill More than 1 year ago
Veiled at Midnight is based on a riveting part of history that I’ve read too little about. Lindsay’s characters, ordinary at first, rise out of the drama, finding extraordinary courage they little suspected they possessed. Complex relationships and deep emotional lives made this a novel that stayed with me long after I put it down. Gritty yet tender, realistic yet larger than life, with a beautiful spiritual takeaway, The novel is historical fiction at its finest., in my opinion.