Your God Is Too Glorious: Finding God in the Most Unexpected Places

Your God Is Too Glorious: Finding God in the Most Unexpected Places

by Chad Bird

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780801075667
Publisher: Baker Publishing Group
Publication date: 01/02/2018
Pages: 192
Sales rank: 490,211
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x (d)

About the Author

Chad Bird has served as a pastor in the Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod, as assistant professor of Hebrew and exegetical theology at Concordia Theological Seminary in Ft. Wayne, Indiana, and as a guest lecturer at Lutheran Theological Seminary in Novosibirsk, Siberia. He has contributed articles to the Lutheran Witness, Gottesdienst, Concordia Journal, Concordia Theological Quarterly, Modern Reformation, Concordia Pulpit Resources, Logia, Higher Things, and The Federalist. He is the author of The Infant Priest, Christ Alone, and Night Driving. In addition to hosting chadbird.com, he is a regular contributor to christholdfast.org and 1517legacy.com. He lives in Texas.

Table of Contents

Preface 9

1 God Hiding in Plain Sight 11

2 Friends in Low Places 27

3 Godforsaken Hangouts 47

4 Unorthodox Headhunter 65

5 Bringing a Knife to a Gunfight 83

6 Saints John and Jane Doe 101

7 Unsexy Church 117

8 Learning about God in the Devil's Classroom 137

9 Life in the Blood 153

10 Doing Nothing to the Glory of God 171

Notes 187

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Your God Is Too Glorious: Finding God in the Most Unexpected Places 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
joshuadparker More than 1 year ago
YGTG is a popular-level take on the common Lutheran theme of theologia crucis--the theology of the cross. Luther articulated two modes of theology:  the theology of glory and the theology of the cross. A theologian of glory, according to Luther, attempts himself to achieve those things that god himself accomplishes in the cross. Whereas god secures redemption and righteousness by means of suffering--a "veiled unveiling" (Bird, 24) of god's righteousness, a turning the world upside-down--the theologian of glory wants to do those things himself, to accomplishes "glorious" feats for himself. The theologian of the cross sees god at work in the mundane, in suffering, in the poverty of the material world, suffusing the natural realm with grace and holiness, while the theologian of glory seeks out "natural" glory--fame, renown, wealth--in order to glorify themselves. Bird chastises the theologian of glory--or, better, exhorts the theologian of glory to recalibrate. "Your god is too glorious"--not because god is inglorious but because you've misdefined what it is to be glorious. God discloses himself to us in the person of Jesus, son of Mary--betrothed but yet unwed. Jesus suffers an ignominious death; his triumphal entry into Jerusalem is undone within the week. The glory of god disclosed in the suffering of the cross--such is our standard. Jesus spurned the crowds and seemed to do everything within his power to avoid being crowned as a king during his ministry. Instead, he was crowned by the Roman soldiers and mocked as king of the Jews while on the cross. Bird takes this purportedly upside-down view of glory, and he encourages the reader to see god at work in our ordinary circumstances. He draws on his own experiences of suffering--those caused by external circumstances and those from his own hand--to demonstrate the glory of god in the mundane and the difficult. Insofar as that is Bird's aim, YGTG is useful. This isn't to suggest that the work isn't without its problems. One has to wonder whether the appearance of YGTG at this political moment is itself in part a product of the reaction against institutions. Take note of this passage: 'The teachers who have the greatest impact on our lives are not always standing in pulpits or guiding us through Romans during a Sunday morning Bible study. They've written no books, earned no degrees, wouldn't be invited to lecture at a Christian university. They are strangers to the religious system. They lack the credentials to garner interest among churchgoing people. They don't speak Christianese.' (29) All of which is true, as far as it goes. But it feels rooted in a world characterized by Nichols' The Death of Expertise--a world in which established institutions are disempowered and power itself is "democratized." And so, Bird "meets Jesus" at mile twenty of the Boston Marathon (81). And so, the entire world is sacral (122-124). Neither of which are necessarily wrong--simply not explicated sufficiently in the text. Altogether, YGTG introduces readers to a new perspective, in which god dwells gloriously in terrestrial realm and in our material poverty. Bird aptly writes: "We descend into his presence. Where the lowly are, there he is. Where the common duties of life are performed, he is at work." (63) For a simple introduction to a theology of the cross, YGTG serves well. Disclosure: I received this book free from Baker Books through the Baker Books Bloggers Program in exchange for an honest review.
sesquius More than 1 year ago
The cover on this book is so delightful that I couldn't help but select it for reading. But in addition, the idea of "finding God in the most unexpected places" leaned me into finding out more about what Chad Bird had to say. The first chapter I began and was interested in what he had to say, although I did catch myself flipping the pages ahead. But then I moved to the second chapter and started to lose interest. The very first chapter I thought the description was about a female. I admit, I failed to pay attention to the name of the author at this point. I appreciated his attempt in drawing us near and helping us understand that sometimes living a quiet life is more important that attaining life's goals. But beyond that, I admit, I lost what he was talking about. Skimming ahead I came upon three sisters who got their father drunk and then had sex with him. At this point, I'm wondering, I need to reread and try and figure out why on earth this part of Biblical history was necessary.  But to be honest, no matter how many times I reread sentences, paragraphs, chapters, the book failed to talk to me. The writing was very pretty, but failed to connect me to the book. I received this complimentary book from Baker Books Publishers. All opinions are my own.
sesquius More than 1 year ago
The cover on this book is so delightful that I couldn't help but select it for reading. But in addition, the idea of "finding God in the most unexpected places" leaned me into finding out more about what Chad Bird had to say. The first chapter I began and was interested in what he had to say, although I did catch myself flipping the pages ahead. But then I moved to the second chapter and started to lose interest. The very first chapter I thought the description was about a female. I admit, I failed to pay attention to the name of the author at this point. I appreciated his attempt in drawing us near and helping us understand that sometimes living a quiet life is more important that attaining life's goals. But beyond that, I admit, I lost what he was talking about. Skimming ahead I came upon three sisters who got their father drunk and then had sex with him. At this point, I'm wondering, I need to reread and try and figure out why on earth this part of Biblical history was necessary.  But to be honest, no matter how many times I reread sentences, paragraphs, chapters, the book failed to talk to me. The writing was very pretty, but failed to connect me to the book. I received this complimentary book from Baker Books Publishers. All opinions are my own.
seekinggraceandgratitude More than 1 year ago
I was unfamiliar with the author and didn’t immediately latch onto his writing style. However, Chad Bird has lived quite the life and lived with many stories to tell. From his personal experience as a biblical scholar and pastor to his relational failures and mishaps caused by selfish ambition and desires of the flesh, there is something that every fallen human can relate to. Interwoven are Chad’s lessons from life, scripture and biblical encouragement from some of God’s best. Yet perhaps what is even more intriguing than the author’s narrative are the numerous accounts of individuals he interacted with or did life with along his own journey. Your God is Too Glorious is a refreshing book about the simple, ordinary and unexpected places our heart longs to experience as a way to discover deep purpose. It’s about finding quiet and stillness amidst a loud and chaotic world. It’s about waxing off the shiny veneer we’ve grown accustomed to so we can appreciate what is real and true in its authentic, humble and vulnerable state. And most importantly, it’s about opening our eyes to the little things and lowly people who surround our daily life and are direct connections to our God above. Being ignorant to their presence or overlooking their importance could rob our souls from knowing, understanding and feeling God on an out-of-this-world level. I enjoyed reading this book and was reminded throughout to slow down and acknowledge the many opportunities we have each day to witness glimpses of God’s glory. My only negative feedback would be in the length and repetitiveness of the book; at 186 pages, I personally felt that the content covered could have been limited to a 2500 word article or blog post (sans the personal stories). The real life examples of God’s goodness in unexpected places and through unassuming Christians made the book intriguing and meaningful, however, in my opinion, they seemed better suited for Chicken Soup for the Soul.
summer_no9 More than 1 year ago
This book was very encouraging and compelling to read with also giving us to learn how to see the work of God in a different way: through our ears, Our vision must be held captive by the Word of God. It will be denes divine reality, and through it we are able to see as God sees. I highly recommend to everyone must to read this book. “ I received complimentary a copy of this book from Baker Books Bloggers for this review”.
summer_no9 More than 1 year ago
This book was very encouraging and compelling to read with also giving us to learn how to see the work of God in a different way: through our ears, Our vision must be held captive by the Word of God. It will be denes divine reality, and through it we are able to see as God sees. I highly recommend to everyone must to read this book. “ I received complimentary a copy of this book from Baker Books Bloggers for this review”.