A Throne of Bones

A Throne of Bones

5.0 2
by Vox Day
     
 

In Selenoth, the race of Man is on the ascendant. The ancient dragons sleep. The ghastly Witchkings are no more; their evil power destroyed by the courage of Men and the fearsome magic of the Elves. The Dwarves have retreated to the kingdoms of the Underdeep, the trolls hide in their mountains, and even the savage orc tribes have learned to dread the iron discipline…  See more details below

Overview

In Selenoth, the race of Man is on the ascendant. The ancient dragons sleep. The ghastly Witchkings are no more; their evil power destroyed by the courage of Men and the fearsome magic of the Elves. The Dwarves have retreated to the kingdoms of the Underdeep, the trolls hide in their mountains, and even the savage orc tribes have learned to dread the iron discipline of Amorr's mighty legions. But after four hundred years of mutual suspicion, the rivalry between two of the Houses Martial that rule the Amorran Senate threatens to turn violent, and unrest sparks rebellion throughout the imperial provinces. In the north, the barbarian reavers who have long plagued the coasts of the White Sea beg for the royal protection of the King of Savondir, as they flee a vicious race of wolf-demons. In the east, the war drums echo throughout the mountains as orcs and goblins gather in great numbers, summoned by their bestial gods.

And when the Most Holy and Sanctified Father is found dead in his bed, leaving the Ivory Throne of the Apostles unclaimed, the temptation to seize the Sacred College and wield Holy Mother Church as a weapon is more than some fallen souls can resist.

***

Vox Day is a writer and game designer. His interests include economics, history, technology, and wargames. He has written nine books, including "Summa Elvetica: A Casuistry of the Elvish Controversy" and "The Return of the Great Depression," and speaks three languages. He is a non-denominational Christian and has been recognized as one of the Internet's most influential libertarians.

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781935929826
Publisher:
Marcher Lord Press
Publication date:
12/01/2012
Pages:
854
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 2.06(d)

Meet the Author

Vox Day graduated in 1990 from Bucknell University with degrees in Economics and Asian Studies. He is a member of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers Association, the International Game Developers Association, and Mensa, and helped found the techno band Psykosonik. In addition to his weekly columns, he transmits contagious and controversial memes daily from the Vox Popoli blog.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

A Throne of Bones 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Nurture More than 1 year ago
Set in the world of Selenoth he created for a previous work Summa Elvetica, published under his real name Theodore Beale, Vox Day's A Throne of Bones is a masterful Fantasy novel after the style of GRR Martin told from the perspectives of seven or so far-flung characters in a World much like JRR Tolkien's Middle Earth with Dwarves, Elves and Orcs, except with Catholic Church-, 5th Century Rome-, and 15th Century France-like analogs.  The story takes some time to set up, but once all of the major characters are set up, the tail is a winding and unexpected roller-coaster ride of military duty, religious devotion, treasure hunts, close get-aways, hopeless love and unwinnable battles.  The first installment of a three book trilogy, I'm looking forward to what comes next.  Vox Day is a Christian author, and this work has sparked a good deal of controversy in that it depicts a great many characters acting in immoral ways, and it is too graphic for children to read.  While it is not sanitized the way some Christians would like, the work is distinctly coming from a Christian worldview: whenever a character calls upon Jesus' name, and whenever the occult is used against the sincerely religious, the Christian God is shown to be in control.  The Bible itself isn't sanitized, so I see no reason Christian fiction should be at the expense of dramatic realism, except that the work cannot be read to children.  As I said, I enjoyed it very much and look forward to the second installment in the trilogy.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Enjoyable and well grounded human story set in a fantasy world. Day returns to the world he created in Summa Elvecta (sp?). It is a grand story and a great read.