ASTRONOMY

ASTRONOMY

4.3 3
by GARRETT P. SERVISS
     
 
TO THE READER


In the pages that follow, the author has endeavored to encourage the
study of the heavenly bodies by pointing out some of the interesting and
marvelous phenomena of the universe that are visible with little or no
assistance from optical instruments, and indicating means of becoming
acquainted with the constellations and the

Overview

TO THE READER


In the pages that follow, the author has endeavored to encourage the
study of the heavenly bodies by pointing out some of the interesting and
marvelous phenomena of the universe that are visible with little or no
assistance from optical instruments, and indicating means of becoming
acquainted with the constellations and the planets. Knowing that an
opera-glass is capable of revealing some of the most beautiful sights in
the starry dome, and believing that many persons would be glad to learn
the fact, he set to work with such an instrument and surveyed all the
constellations visible in the latitude of New York, carefully noting
everything that it seemed might interest amateur star-gazers. All the
objects thus observed have not been included in this book, lest the
multiplicity of details should deter or discourage the very readers for
whom it was specially written. On the other hand, there is nothing
described as visible with an opera-glass or a field-glass which the
author has not seen with an instrument of that description, and which
any person possessing eye-sight of average quality and a competent glass
should not be able to discern.

But, in order to lend due interest to the subject, and place it before
the reader in a proper light and true perspective, many facts have been
stated concerning the objects described, the ascertainment of which has
required the aid of powerful telescopes, and to observers with such
instruments is reserved the noble pleasure of confirming with their own
eyes those wonderful discoveries which the looker with an opera-glass
can not hope to behold unless, happily, he should be spurred on to the
possession of a telescope. Yet even to glimpse dimly these distant
wonders, knowing what a closer view would reveal, is a source of no mean
satisfaction, while the celestial phenomena that lie easily within reach
of an opera-glass are sufficient to furnish delight and instruction for
many an evening.

It should be said that the division of the stars used in this book into
the "Stars of Spring," "Stars of Summer," "Stars of Autumn," and "Stars
of Winter," is purely arbitrary, and intended only to indicate the
seasons when certain constellations are best situated for observation or
most conspicuous.

The greater part of the matter composing this volume appeared originally
in a series of articles contributed by the author to "The Popular
Science Monthly" in 1887-'88. The reception that those articles met with
encouraged him to revise and enlarge them for publication in the more
permanent form of a book.

G. P. S.

BROOKLYN, N. Y., _September, 1888._




CONTENTS.


PAGE
INTRODUCTION 1

Popular interest in the phenomena of the heavens.

The opera-glass as an instrument of observation for beginners
in star-study.

Testing an opera-glass.


CHAPTER I.

THE STARS OF SPRING 7

_Description of the Constellations_--Auriga, the Charioteer;
Berenice's Hair; Cancer, the Crab [the Manger]; Canis
Minor, the Lesser Dog; Corvus, the Crow; Crateris, the
Cup; Gemini, the Twins; Hydra, the Water-Serpent; Leo,
the Lion; Ursa Major, the Greater Bear [the Great Dipper];
Ursa Minor, the Lesser Bear [the Pole-Star].

A circular index-map, maps on a larger scale, of the
constellations described, and pictures of remarkable
objects.


CHAPTER II.

THE STARS OF SUMMER 30

_Description of the Constellations_--Aquila, the Eagle;
Boötes, the Herdsman, or Bear-Diver; Canes Venatici,
the Hunting-Dogs; Cygnus, the Swan [the Northern Cross];
Delphinus, the Dolphin; Draco, the Dragon; Hercules
[the Great Sun-Swarm, 13 M]; Libra, the Balance; Lyra,
the Harp; the Northern Crown; Ophiuchus et Serpens,
the Serpent-bearer and the Serpent; Sagitta, the Arrow;
Sagittarius, the Archer; Scorpio, the Scorpion;
Sobieski's Shield; Taurus Poniatowskii, Poniatowsky's
Bull; Virgo, the Virgin [the Field of the Nebulæ];
Vulpecula, the Little Fox.

A circular index-map, maps, on a larger scale, of the
constellations described, and pictures of remarkable
objects.


CHAPTER III.

THE STARS OF AUTUMN

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940013615687
Publisher:
SAP
Publication date:
07/17/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
127 KB

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ASTRONOMY 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love astronomy and writing a book about it just like this one. Astronomy is very inspirational!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is the bwst astronomy book i have ever read ans to noo only people who are smart in science and phisics can read this i am tenandbi would like to be an astronomer
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book does not make scense!!!!!!!!!