Because They Hate: A Survivor of Islamic Terror Warns America

( 51 )

Overview

"Her writing is eloquent and her passion tremendous."

Publishers Weekly

“Brigitte Gabriel's words should be read, and studied carefully, by all the law enforcement and government officials of the West — as well as by everyone who values freedom.”

— Robert Spencer, author of The Politically Incorrect Guide to Islam (and the Crusades)

Brigitte Gabriel lost her childhood to militant Islam, when militant Muslims from throughout the Middle East ...

See more details below
Paperback (Reprint)
$13.40
BN.com price
(Save 21%)$16.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (12) from $5.63   
  • New (2) from $12.99   
  • Used (10) from $5.45   
Because They Hate: A Survivor of Islamic Terror Warns America

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$9.99
BN.com price

Overview

"Her writing is eloquent and her passion tremendous."

Publishers Weekly

“Brigitte Gabriel's words should be read, and studied carefully, by all the law enforcement and government officials of the West — as well as by everyone who values freedom.”

— Robert Spencer, author of The Politically Incorrect Guide to Islam (and the Crusades)

Brigitte Gabriel lost her childhood to militant Islam, when militant Muslims from throughout the Middle East poured into Lebanon and declared jihad against the Lebanese Christians. Because They Hate warns that the US is threatened by fundamentalist Islamic theology in the same way Lebanon was— radical Islam will stop at nothing short of domination of all non-Muslim countries.

Fiercely articulate and passionately committed, Because They Hate tells Gabriel's personal story as well as outlines the history, social movements, and religious divisions that have led to this critical historical conflict.

BRIGITTE GABRIEL is a US-based journalist and news producer who started her career as an anchor for World News, an evening Arabic news program broadcast throughout the Middle East. As a terrorism expert and the founder of the nonprofit organization American Congress for Truth, Brigitte Gabriel travels widely and speaks regularly on topics related to the Middle East.

www.americancongressfortruth.com

Read More Show Less
  • Because They Hate
    Because They Hate  

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Brigitte Gabriel's story is at once intensely personal and possessing global significance . . . the story of her family and her childhood encapsulates the threat that faces the entire free world today. Brigitte Gabriel's words should be read, and studied carefully, by all the law enforcement and government officials of the West — as well as by everyone who values freedom.”

— Robert Spencer, author of The Politically Incorrect Guide to Islam (and the Crusades)

"Her writing is eloquent and her passion tremendous"

Publishers Weekly

“Brigitte Gabriel eloquently reminds America what is truly at stake in this struggle against terrorism: our families, our way of life, and our hopes. Ms. Gabriel's personal account of her own experience is riveting, compelling and spellbinding. This is a must read for the entire American public . . . Because They Hate contains monumental revelations that will shock and disturb you. But it is also a story of an indomitable spirit—Brigitte's— that will move you.”

—Steve Emerson, author of American Jihad: The Terrorists Living Amongst Us, Executive Director, the Investigative Project on Terrorism

“[Brigitte Gabriel’s] writing is a critical wake-up call to Americans as we face the threat of takeover by jihadists. We are glad to be able to help her share her story with God-fearing, patriotic Americans who care about the truth and want to learn about the threat every nation throughout the world is facing from radical Islam.”

—Paul F. Crouch, Jr., Vice President of Administration, Trinity Broadcasting Network

"A compelling and captivating personal story with a powerful lesson about threats to freedom in our time."

—R. James Woolsey, Director of Central Intelligence, 1993-95

Because They Hate should be read by all to understand radical Islam. . . This book gives dire warning of what is to come if the democratic and Western world does not take responsible action to protect its people and societies. The United States is the primary target as Islamic Radicalism attempts to spread its worldwide dominance.”

—Paul E. Vallely, Maj. General US Army (Ret.), FOX News Channel Military Analyst, and coauthor of Endgame: The Blueprint for Victory in the War on Terror

"Part memoir and part analysis of the social, political, and religious factors that created the current situation in the Middle East, Gabriel issues a clear warning."

The Tampa Tribune

“Gabriel makes her case, but also offers a sound and powerful program of what we have to do as a nation and as individuals to stave off defeat by radical Islam.”

The Bulletin

"Gabriel believes the West is complacent about the threat posed by radical Islam. She learned while growing up Christian in Lebanon that Islamofascists are serious—and if we want to survive we better take them seriously. She speaks with the passion of a survivor who has seen death and destruction firsthand—and doesn't want America to suffer the same future as Lebanon."

World Magazine

Publishers Weekly
With strident confidence, American Congress for Truth founder Gabriel rebukes the American public for being "weak, asleep or careless" in the face of Muslim terrorism. A Christian survivor of the vicious civil war between Lebanese Christians and Muslims in the 1970s, Gabriel leans on her own terrifying experiences to condemn Muslims, without apparent regard for their ethnicity, ideology or historical role. Consistently using the words "Muslim" and "Arab" as if they were interchangeable, she concludes that the U.S. is "facing total destruction" at the hands of people who are uncultured and cruel, and prescribes such solutions as "profile, profile and profile," and banning "hate education" in Islamic institutions. Though her writing is eloquent and her passion tremendous, Gabriel's strict dichotomy between "evil versus goodness" is too extreme to be informative. Readers will be forced to decide whether or not to accept her heart-felt bias. (Oct.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312358389
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 1/8/2008
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 63,076
  • Product dimensions: 5.42 (w) x 8.20 (h) x 0.75 (d)

Meet the Author

BRIGITTE GABRIEL is a US-based journalist and news producer who started her career as an anchor for World News, an evening Arabic news program. As a terrorism expert and the founder of the nonprofit organization ACT! for America, Brigitte Gabriel travels widely and speaks regularly on topics related to the Middle East. She has addressed audiences at the FBI, the United States Special Operations Command, the Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain, and the Joint Forces Staff College, among others.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

Peace Before the Rage

It's 1978. I am thirteen years old. My family is in the third year of living in this bomb shelter, a tiny underground room that sits off to the side of a bombed-out pile of rubble that was once our beautiful home. Tonight the shelling is the heaviest it has been in two and a half years. The three of us, my elderly father and mother and me, sit in the dark on the corner of the bed.

We have been trapped in our shelter now for three days, and we are out of water. A shell hit near the entrance of our shelter, collapsing a wall of sandbags against our door and imprisoning us inside. We have given up trying to get it open.

No one knows we are trapped. For three days we have called out and screamed for help. But we are too far from the road for anyone to hear us amid the explosions. Besides, no one is going to venture outside in this heavy shelling. We don't talk about it, but we could die of thirst or starvation if this goes on much longer.

The shelling is so bad we can't sleep. If a big 155-millimeter bomb lands on our shelter, that's the end for us. I do not want to die. I only hope it will kill us quickly, just bang and nothing more, rather than wounding us so that we die slowly and painfully. There is no one to get us to the hospital or give us first aid. I've already gone through being wounded and buried alive in rubble. A direct hit from a shell would be better.

To distract me, my parents are talking about my childhood, telling me how surprised they were when I came into their life, how much joy I have brought them, how they regret that I must live through this nightmare.

I was born in the small town of Marjayoun, a once peaceful, idyllic Christian town in the mountains of southern Lebanon. For my first ten years I lived a charmed and privileged life. All that came to an end when a religious war, declared by the Muslims against the Christians, and tore my country and my life apart. It was a war that the world did not understand.

This book is a warning. It is a warning that what happened to me and my country of birth could, terrifyingly, happen here in America, my country of adoption. It is a warning about what happened to countless other non-Muslims in the Middle East and what should never happen again anywhere or to anyone else. It now is becoming a dire warning because I see increasing evidence that what happened to me in Lebanon is beginning to happen in towns and cities throughout America and the Western world. Watching the World Trade Center buildings fall in 2001, I was struck by the same fear that I experienced during the war in Lebanon. As I watched, words instinctively came from my mouth as I spoke to the TV screen: "Now they are here." I knew instantly why I had survived the suffering I experienced and what the purpose of my life would be. My being an eyewitness to the assault of Islamic jihad against non-Muslim Lebanese gives me a voice to help America and the West understand what is now happening to them.

But for you to understand anything about how the Middle East and Islamic jihad relate to the West, you must remember this: without understanding the past you will never understand the present and will have no idea how to plan for the future.

My country of Lebanon was much like America and the West are today. It was an island of freedom in the middle of an Islamic sea of tyranny and oppression. The majority of our citizens adhered to European Christian customs, traditions, ethics, and philosophy. Beirut, our capital, was commonly called the Paris of the Middle East. Our seemingly modern lifestyle, progressive thinking, democratic form of government, and schools of higher learning were a thorn in the side of the backward, feuding, feudal Arab world, whose Islamic customs and religious philosophies dominated other countries of the Middle East.

Lebanon is small, about 135 miles long and only about 25 to 50 miles wide. It is situated on the east coast of the Mediterranean between Israel to the south and Syria to the east and north. Lebanon has both pristine beaches and snowcapped mountains, and an ideal Mediterranean climate most of the time. Its coastal resorts and city nightlife were famous before the war. In ancient times, Lebanon was known as "the White" because of its distinctive snow-crowned inland mountain ranges.

My town, Marjayoun, lies between two beautiful green valleys, along the top of a long range of hills that runs from the border of Israel north into southern Lebanon. To the west is the Litani River valley. The hill slopes gently down to the river on the far side of the valley that runs along the bottom of steep cliffs that border its western bank. On top of the cliff stands the historic Beaufort Castle, once inhabited by a French nobleman who in the 1860s was sent by Napoleon III to intervene on behalf of the Christians in Lebanon being plagued by the Druze, a religious sect of Islam. The other valley to the east has many springs, which explains the name of my town: Marjayoun means "the valley of springs." Across this valley toward the east is a large Muslim town called Elkhiam. Beyond Elkhiam, rising over nine thousand feet, is Mount Hermon, which is usually snowcapped.

Marjayoun was a small, peaceful town, much like any small town in the USA, with about three thousand citizens. There were Catholic and Protestant churches and a cemetery. The church bells rang for services, prayers, weddings, and funerals. We had a town center where we did most of our shopping, and one movie theater, which doubled as a place for community activities and school stage productions. There was a Catholic school, a private school, and public elementary and high schools. Some people were farmers who worked the fields down in the valley. Some were businessmen who had hardware stores, grocery stores, clothing stores, beauty parlors, and restaurants. We had an elected city council and mayor. It was a close-knit country town that you might drive through in five minutes. It was a great place to live. While growing up as the only child born to an elderly couple, I always knew there would be a special meaning and purpose for my life. That meaning and purpose would be derived from the horror Lebanon and I would soon face, and are what this book is about.

My parents' house was located on the road that ran along the ridge of the hill connecting Marjayoun with another Christian town to the south called Klaia. Our majestic two-story stone house was set into the side of a hill and surrounded by beautiful gardens of fruit trees and flowers. My parents had been married for more than twenty years but were unable to have any children. In Arab culture, it is considered shameful when a woman is unable to bear children, and it is always considered the woman's fault. Thus, being childless had been a major source of frustration for my parents. They had prayed for a child year after year. Then, in the late summer of 1964, my mother, at fifty-four years of age, noticed a mysterious swelling in her abdomen. Her alarm increased as the swelling continued to grow. She began to believe that she was ill with cancer and about to die. Since she was a devout Maronite Christian, she prayed about her "illness" every evening at the altar of the Virgin Mary hanging on the wall of the living room. She would spend hours praying to Mary and Jesus for comfort, saying the rosary, burning candles, and crossing herself.

A visit to the doctor was in order. After a few tests the doctor had great news: she was pregnant. My mother's mouth dropped open. She couldn't believe her ears. "No! How can that be?" she asked. "At my age! And my husband is sixty!" Although the signs would have been unmistakable to a younger woman, she never imagined that she could become pregnant at her age.

Despite the potential difficulty and danger in having a child at her age, my mother was overjoyed. She couldn't wait to tell my father. Finally, their prayers had been answered. My parents would love me very much, and my birth would always be looked upon as redemption for my mother, and proof of God's love.

Although everyone was delighted with the news, my mother, with only two months left in her pregnancy, faced a new concern. Would her child be a boy or a girl? My mother was well educated for a woman in Lebanese society, and had a self-assurance and confidence few women could muster. She knew, however, that Arab culture praised the birth of a boy but condemned the birth of a girl. As her delivery day approached, this reality cast a shadow over her joy.

I had not yet been born, but the oppressive hand of Arab culture and society had already touched my life.

The nearest hospital that could handle deliveries was a two-hour drive away. When the day arrived, my father loaded my mother and her suitcase into a taxi and sent her off to the hospital alone. He stayed home. Men in Lebanon don't have much to do with delivering babies or taking care of children. They will take credit if the baby is a boy, and will shower him with attention, love, and praise. If the baby is a girl, usually there is neither credit taken nor attention paid. After delivery a woman will know immediately if it is a girl by the lack of excitement and congratulations by the doctor or nurses. In my mother's case, because of her age, she was congratulated on surviving delivery and giving birth to a healthy child.

However, even though I was a girl, people from all the surrounding towns and from every walk of life came to see us in Marjayoun because my father was a former government official, a successful businessman, and a pillar of the Maronite community. Indeed, he had raised the money to build the church in Marjayoun. So they came to pay their respects and to see and be seen, bringing with them the traditional birth gifts of gold jewelry, milk, and honey. The church gave a present of incense to my parents so that they could light a candle and burn it every night in thanks for my birth. I was told many times throughout my youth that the turnout for my birth celebration was "pretty good, for a girl."

My early childhood could be described as idyllic. As my parents' only child, I was lavished with all of their affection. They were also financially comfortable, so, along with their care and love, they could afford to give me lots of toys and material possessions. After retiring from his job with the Lebanese government in his late fifties, my father became a landlord and restaurateur. He built a restaurant on our property, as well as a few small homes attached to our main residence, which he rented out to other families.

Like most of the buildings in Lebanon, our house was constructed of light brown stone quarried from our mountains. Each room had high ceilings, and across the front of each story were the main doors and eight wide arched windows. My father's restaurant was located to the left and front of our property, facing the main road. A long driveway to the right of the restaurant went up the hill to our house.

My parents kept big, elaborate gardens bordered by jasmine bushes both in front and in back of our house. They planted strawberries, about ten different kinds of grapes, and every kind of fruit tree you could imagine: apple, orange, grapefruit, peach, plum, pear, persimmon, apricot, lemon, fig, and cherry. They also planted mint, parsley, and many types of vegetables: three kinds of beans, artichokes, squash, eggplant, cauliflower, green peppers, onions, tomatoes, cucumbers, lettuce, watermelons, and cantaloupe. In addition to fruit-bearing trees and bushes, they grew roses. In the springtime, all the trees and bushes would bloom in a variety of colors. We lived in a virtual Garden of Eden.

My day always started with a long breakfast, usually hot milk and eggs with both of my parents. Papa and Mama woke early, at six thirty. Papa would make his list of fresh restaurant supplies to buy for the day from the market while Mama made breakfast.

For me, every day was like a party. The people renting in our apartment complex became one big family. We were nine children all about the same age—within five years of each other—and we always played together. We might start the day outside or in one of the apartments, but since I had so many toys—and my own playroom—we usually ended up at my house. Our moms would also gather there each morning, bringing with them whatever they were going to fix for lunch. While preparing lunch, they would drink coffee, share news and gossip, laugh and cry.

When I turned four, it was time for me to go to school. My parents sent me to a private school, Le Saint Coeur, one of the most reputable Catholic primary schools in the country. Le Saint Coeur was on the edge of a tall hill from where we could look down and see the entire green valley and smaller hills covered with wildflowers. We had a breathtaking view of historic Beaufort Castle, as well as one of the most famous rivers in the Middle East, the Litani. The winding, sparkling Litani flows from Syria to Lebanon, supplying most of the country with water and hydroelectric power.

Our lessons were taught in both Arabic and French, and the teachers, especially the nuns, were strict and demanding. Homework was assigned from the very first day. But I loved school, and I wanted to be a "good girl," so I worked hard, learned quickly, and soon, I could read and write in both languages.

Our school day was finished at 2:00 p.m. After we were released, I would go home and eat lunch with Papa and Mama. In Lebanon, the midday meal is the main meal of the day. It's the time when family members gather around the table to eat and talk over the morning's events and their plans for the rest of the day.

It was always a joy to come home from school and find my parents standing outside on the balcony waiting for me. They would greet me with a big smile, a hug, and a kiss. Driving rain, summer heat, freezing snow—it didn't matter to them. In the wintertime, they would stand shivering in their coats or under umbrellas until I arrived. My mother would greet me by telling me all the special things she had done for me that day. She would say, "Look, I made you your favorite cake," or "You know what? The dress that I was sewing for you is finished. I can't wait for you to try it on." The house would always smell wonderful when I came home from school. Our meal would include fresh bread from the bakery and a variety of delicious fruits. I would proudly tell my parents about what I had learned in school that day, and then we would take a nap, as was customary. I remember the roads would be empty at that hour because everyone in town would be sleeping. Today, as a mother and businesswoman in American society, I really miss that custom.

Around three o'clock in the afternoon, Marjayoun would wake up from its community nap. Papa would go down to his restaurant to be ready when all the shops and businesses reopened at around four. On some afternoons Mama would take me along while she went to visit her friends. Some of them owned businesses, and we would walk to them and buy ice cream and visit. The wives worked alongside their husbands running the stores, as my mother helped my dad.

As much as I loved playing grown-up with Mama and her friends, my favorite afternoon activity was riding my bicycle from one end of Marjayoun to the other. This was no ordinary bicycle. It was painted red and yellow. Papa had put a light and a horn on it too, but I was never allowed to use the horn on the road. That would not have been polite or ladylike.

Whether I went with Mama to visit with her friends or riding on my bicycle, we would always end up at Papa's restaurant for dinner. The air around the restaurant was filled with tempting aromas from the kitchen, and if the wind was right I could identify the evening's specialty a hundred feet away. Our restaurant was known not only for the best food in town and the best prices, but also for the beautiful view. People loved sitting out on the terrace facing majestic, snowcapped Mount Hermon across the boulevard.

At seven thirty, Mama would take me up to our house and tidy up or prepare for the next day while I studied and did homework. When Papa came home from the restaurant, they would both tuck me into bed and sit with me for a while. We would say our prayers and exchange endearments, and I would go to sleep happy, comfortable, and secure.

For my tenth birthday, October 21, 1974, my parents decided to throw a huge birthday party. My mother was sixty-five years old, and my father was approaching seventy. They invited all their closest friends and all of mine for an early sit-down dinner. Even my teacher, Mademoiselle Amal, was invited. About twenty adults and fifteen children came, including, of course, our entire housing complex's children and parents, plus Tante Madeline and Uncle Jamil with their sons Walid and Milad, and Tante Samira and Uncle George with their three girls, Rose, Violette, and Ghada. They dressed in their Sunday best and walked from the other end of town just to attend the dinner.

Mama spent the whole day chopping vegetables for tabouli, the traditional Lebanese salad, and making kebabs to cook on the shish that afternoon. She had been cooking for the previous two days, preparing stuffed grape leaves; kibbe, the traditional Lebanese meat loaf; humus; meat pies; a variety of Lebanese appetizers; and of course baklava. My father didn't go to the restaurant that day. Instead, he spent the morning cutting roses from our garden for the table. Since it was already fall, the sky was cloudy and the air a bit chilly, so the dinner was held indoors. Our dining-room table wasn't big enough, so my parents borrowed furniture from the restaurant. My mother got out her fancy embroidered tablecloths and arranged roses at both ends of the table. She was determined that everything would be just perfect. At three o'clock, I got dressed in a white-and-green dress that Mama had sewn just for the occasion.

Every inch of the main table was covered with appetizers, from cashews and almonds to every single dip and delicacy on the Lebanese menu. My parents were pleased and proud as their guests kept commenting on the delicious food and the wonderful decorations. Little did we know that this was going to be the last party for a long, long time. Indeed, it marked the end of my dream childhood. One month later, in November 1975, Lebanon's national nightmare began, and with it began the destruction of our lives.

Copyright © 2006 by Brigitte Gabriel. All rights reserved.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents


Introduction to the 2006 Edition     xi
Introduction to the 2008 Edition     xv
Peace Before the Rage     1
My 9/11     24
Life Under Terror     34
Hopeless Existence     53
A Life-changing Experience     69
Rebuilding Our Lives     83
Clash of Civilizations     102
Terrorists Among Us     124
The Toxic Tsunami of Hate     144
The Ivy-Covered Fifth Column: Islamic Influence Alive and Well on American Campuses     158
Bull's-eye of the Middle East     169
Societies Are Not Created Equal     183
Is Islam a Peaceful Religion?     200
Political Correctness Gone Mad     216
Notes     235
Acknowledgments     257
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 51 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(29)

4 Star

(5)

3 Star

(4)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(11)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 51 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 8, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    A Woman on a mission - She is carrying the cross for Christians, Jews and the moderate Muslims who are not able to stand up and speak the truth.

    Brigitte has done an exceptional job detailing her life in a war against Christians. She and I lived the same war; we are the same age; faced similar fears and persecution, though we lived in different parts of the country. She does indeed speak out what we think. As Christians, we try to forgive and move on with our lives. But few muslims who truly hate anything non-muslim are being the voice for all muslims. I have had debates with Muslims and Jews alike. She is correct. Muslims responds with hate and ugliness; they don't care to hear what you have to say. Jews on the other hand respect your opinion and offer their opposing view.

    I have very close muslims friends. I trust them with my life. But they are not the majority. Good people, good heart, but like most all of us humans(christians, jews or muslims) they don't speak up when they should. If their religion is being misrepresented, it is their job, not the chrsitians or jews, to work hard to defend it and protect it from the extremists within them.

    It is truly as simple as she says, prove her wrong, prove us wrong. Until Saudi Arabia, Iran, Syria and the like countries defend and protect the freedom of Christians and Jews to worship in their countries and preach Jesus and Moses, they have absolutely no leg to stand on when they do little to keep extremists from attacking the Twin towers and our way of lives in America. And to top it of, they still complain that we are being racists and extremists.

    The facts do speak for themselves.

    The Christians of Lebanon fought to protect their faith and voice in the middle east. Today however, they are very split; some have allegience to Saudi Arabia while others to Hizbollah/Iran. Maybe it is a survival mode, but there was a time when Christians were the few, the good and the undefeated. Not today.

    Lebanon is the last Christian country in the Middle East by which its president has to be Christian. It is a Republican form of government. What other country in the "arab world" can claim that. We see what Iran is doing to its people. We saw what Iraq did to its people (irrespective of your view of the war today). We see what Syria does to its people. Yet, they come to America, supposedly to run away from that culture only to impose it on us.

    8 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2008

    I am amazed

    It does not amaze me that someone who was 10 yrs old left a country that has changed so much since is able to write a book that I found to be far from the truth. I lived in Lebanon till 1997 and I am a Christian Lebanese as well even though I hate to differentiate between religions. I felt that the book was written by someone who is paid or eager to gain acceptance by a side that enjoys building more fear and hatred toward the Muslims. The only Muslims that came to Lebanon in 1975 were the Palestinians and some Libians. The Palestinians came due to a natural process that states when you suppress and terrorize people they would migrate. And the only place the Palestinians could migrate to are neighboring countries. I was hoping this book is based on facts but it was the oppositge and part of a propaganda and smudge campaign. I suggest that the writer spends more time reading about the History of the ME so she can enlighten us in the future with a book that shines the light on the true cause of the issues in the Middle East 'part of it, I agree, is extremism'

    8 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2008

    A Must Read and Own For Everyone

    Every American should read this book, and own two or more copies of it. One to keep and annotate, one to circulate to friends and family. Ms. Gabriel's story needed to be told, she did it well, without frills or prejudice. It is all verifiable. Her point of view is unique and priceless. - Duke

    6 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 6, 2008

    A reviewer

    Just finished reading this book. It was hard to put it down. Yes, America, we better wake up. The writing is on the wall. September 11,2001 changed America, but how soon did some Americans forget. If we don't rememeber our past, we are doomed to repeat it.

    6 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 9, 2008

    Wake Up, America

    This riveting, first person account of militant islam's take over of Lebanon is a true wake up call. Gabriel shows how an open, tolerant society is an easy target for an organized attack of this sort. The approach has been perfected over the centuries. This book is an eye opener for those in America who simply don't understand the depth of attack occurring in our schools, political institutions and our courts. Wake up!

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2007

    because she hates!

    EVERY story has 2 sides. Here's the other side, the side that the author chose to omit. 1. On Arabs I quote the author:' What have the Arabs contributed to the world other than suicide bombimg and terrorism. Where is their contribution to science, medication and technology? Oviously, Ms Gabriel did not do her homework. But to answer her question very briefly I say that among the Arabs inventions were: the telescope (Abul hasan),the Pendulum (Ibn Yunus), The watch/clock (Kutbi),The windmill (Almasudi),the Arab numeric we use today (1,2,3) the number zero was invented by Arabs also Algorithm and Algebra (Al-khawarizmi). etc... Ms Gabriel can look this up along with other Arab contribution to knowledge. 2. On stories: In the book the reader can find a whole lot of disgusting, disturbing stories. While reading I tried to check out the references for these stories and to my shock I found that every story had mostly only one footage, usually an internet website. In college we were taught that a scientific research should offer serious evidence and that includes extracts from well known books/ magazines/documents/websites for it to come out as a reliable source! Still I decide to just look up one of the stories written about a woman called Asma. According to Ms Gabriel 'She was killed by a sword thrust to her abdomen while SUCKLING HER BABY IN BED.' p.110.note 8. I check the website out and it says'In his displeasure towards her, Muhammad asked his followers to murder her as well. She was killed while she SLEPT.' Say, sleeping and nursing are 2 different acts, aren't they? Having trouble copying Ms Gabriel? This is only one example of distortion: not only does she tell a story that has no evidence whatsoever in her book -other than of course the famous website (she might as well use a blog for her references)- but also she makes sure to manipulate it in order to create the effect she desires.Not so proffessional I would say. It's Just one e.g of stories blown way out of proportion left with no evidence. I try to check other 'stories' of hers just for the fun of it, I find web sites mentioned in her footage that have expired or even websites that are not related to the story in any way. So I get a good laugh. 3. On the Middle East: The author claims that the war in Lebanon was a 'religious war declared by the Muslims against the Christians' Wrong again. Any objective lebanese would say that war in Lebanon was a civil war and a war of the others (Palestinian Syrian, Israeli) on the lebanese soil. ID killing was practiced by ALL against ALL. Again she's leaving out half of 'the truth.' As soon as sectarian violence popped off, a number of war crimes were commited by ALL the Lebanese factions participating in the civil war. Her attempt in labeling 'bad guys' and 'good guys' is even hilarious. . 4. On Lebanese women: 'One thing that both muslim and christian cultures shared was their lack of respect and equality for women' I thought this was kind of fun to read. Being a woman who grew up in Lebanon I know a great deal of women rights there! Men and women are highly encouraged to go to college and to graduate schools. At school lebanese boys AND girls learn 3 languages and in some schools 4. I, myself, went to the Lycee franco libanais a secular french school in Lebanon where both muslims and christians enjoyed sharing daily life even in the worst of circumstances. Women ( muslims and christians) in Lebanon are doctors, lawyers, parliament members, whatever they please and stay at home educated moms by choice. I must say though that in Lebanon city life is very different than country life. Ms Gabriel grew up in a small town, she probably never had the chance to go to the cities where people - all people mingled and had fun. She also never had the chance to go to college to see that classrooms are packed with women nor to learn that good books are m

    5 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 21, 2008

    We had better get our heads out of the sand

    Ms. Gabriel knows whereof she speaks as a person who has experienced the trauma of seeing her country taken over by Muslims. Those who call her writing 'garbage' are those with their 'heads in the sand,' not allowing the facts to interfere with their beliefs. I found her to be a true patriot. Oh, that we native citizens had just a smidgen of her love and concern for her adopted country. As one writer noted, Arabs contributed much to our society 'once upon a time.' But since they have become oil-rich, little creativity has come from the Middle East (other than Israel) - unless you call suicide bombing creative.

    4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 9, 2007

    Author is out of touch with reality

    Ms Gabriel cannot seem to look beyond her own experience to come up with a product that could even be deemed as a journalistic piece. She has no clue about what the real political landscape is in the Middle East let alone Lebanon. Shame on her for pushing her own anger onto her readers and feeding the public a one sided story.

    4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 15, 2006

    Pathetic

    I think it's very sad that this author generalizes and says 'because they hate.' Obviously she is not over a bad situation that happened to her growing up, which is why she wanted to add fuel to the fire. Really aweful book, I didn't feel like it was fair in talking about Islam and Moslims. Not worth reading if you really want to learn about who the Moslims are.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 24, 2006

    worthless garbage

    CAUTION, a big load of fallacies, this so called author is herself a promoter of hate, it is amazing what junk people will write to make money, if you want to learn about the middle east I recommend starting with Patrick Seal's works, not Mrs.'s Gabriel garbage, I regret buying her book, I should have known better, a book endorsed by Steve Emerson can not be of any real worth.

    3 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 21, 2011

    worthless piece of junk

    I just do not believe any of the author's claims. Don't waste your time.

    2 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2011

    Every American needs to read this book

    We don't have any idea how blessed we are to live in the USA. Read this book and pray for America and Israel. Elect people in office nationally and locally with backbone. Heed the warnings! We don't want to be another Lebanon.

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 18, 2010

    Great Read!

    In light of all the controversy over the building of the mosque at Ground Zero. This book is a must read. True story, well documented, researched. Bridgette Gabriel is an Arab Christian/ US citizen/ journalist. this should be required reading in our schools. This is world history that has been deleted or not taught but given the state of the world should be.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2007

    An Excellent Personal Story of Death, Destruction & Yet Hope Remains

    I chose to buy this book from B & N as I have seen interviews with Ms. Garbriel on cable news and on the web. She is an impassioned person who speaks from her past NOT based on talking points sent down by politicans or scholars intent on political correctness. I decided to buy her book and read her story, in her own words as the living word lives. I was moved by her situation of not only living but, surviving and eventually thriving after years and years of war between the Christians, Muslism, PLO and Lebanese Armies but, other enemies as well. For those reviewers below that have rated her book poorly on the basis that you don't think she was well researched, accurate or scientific enough...I say you have lost the arugment right there. This is NOT a book meant for the science lab or classroom. It is a story about her life and what she went through in Lebanon in the 70's as a Christian in that eventually war torn land. Her experience, her thoughts, her emotions, her feelings are her own...you cannot and will not take away from her what she lived through because you don't agree with her. She represents all that we have seen but, still don't understand here in the US and Europe. The blurring lines between moderate and radical muslims and islam is finer and finer with each passing day. As Ms. Garbriel said so wisely...she traveled thousands of miles and multiple continents to get away from people who kill simply because you are different from them or 'infidels' if you wish and yet...they followed her here and bombed us on our own land. Ms. Gabriel's story is unique to her but, all of us might experience our own story if we allow radical islam and extreme muslims to take over Europe, Asia, Africa, America and other lands. I admire Ms. Gabriel for having the courage to live through a horrific ordeal that should have killed her many times over. I believe that she had a guardian angel or some divine intervention that kept her alive and going so, one day she could tell her tale to the world. Whether the world listens is another issue but, at least she made it to America where she could get the word out. I too believe as many that we won't be able to destroy this evil breeding in the world right now as there is simply too many of them. 'Destruction' is not an option. We cannot convert them either - power in numbers say it wouldn't work. 'Conversion' is not an option (as you cannot leave Islam once you convert to it - you'll be killed - what a loving religion!) But...perhaps there is 'Reform' in the future for those who will see the light. One reviewer noted that arabs created the 'zero'. I have to do homework to verify that one but, how ironic that if they did create the 'zero' in math they may also 'zero' out much of the world in their master plan to rid of the world of everyone but, those evil and crazy like themselves. Since so few muslims who consider themselves 'moderate' speak out then we have to say silence is consent. If you don't stop evil, you contribute to it. I continue to read about how muslims historically take over countries(usually by weapons, force and often deadly wars) and then allow other religions to exist so, they could TAX everyone else heavily for existing in their world. They use the spoils of war and tax to keep their new nation going. Consider the 9/11 hijackers, the shoe bomber, the bomber set on blowing up the GG Bridge in San Fran and others...whether or not they were from good homes or had good schooling...most all of them were existing on welfare for quite awhile(at least until Uncle Benny gave them cash to help finish the job...) So much for being creators and not takers! For anyone with an open mind, respect for human life and dignity, tolerance of other religions and people...do buy this book and read it. Whether you agree or not with Ms. Gabriel's views on things...you should at least hear her experience as it is one we don't get much in the US. We get lots of opinions from politicans, newspapers,

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 15, 2014

    Highly Recommend

    This survivor of the Lebanese Civil War details her struggle to stay alive. Her experiences and love of Western Civilization juxtaposed against the destruction of Islamic Fundamentalism illustrates the need for the world to wake up and face the deadly threat of terrorism.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 28, 2014

    I can't wait to read the book. 

    I can't wait to read the book. 

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2013

    This book is written by a professional journalist, no doubt hire

    This book is written by a professional journalist, no doubt hired to do this horrible hate-filled book. She begins by dragging you into the horrendous realities of her childhood experience never ever mentioning the facts behind the upheaval in the ME and who is really to blame. Instead she manipulates our emotions and that is how she wrote this book--upon emotions and obviously that is how she looks at life: emotionally. She wants to 'warn' America. Let me warn America: Islam is not your enemy. It was not won by violence or the sword. Anyone who believes that is ignorant of the realities of the Ottoman Empire and who started what in all the warring against Muslims. At the point in history of 9/11 Americans knew nothing about Islam. And, these 'writers' were hired to lead you far far away from true knowledge of our beautiful, sober, peaceful religion; one that is not for the weak but for those who want to worship our Creator through fasting, prayer, charity and kindness to all. Muslims are not about Islamitizing anyone. Let there be no coersion in religion, is one of the most well known verses in the Quran. There are no swords and there never were. Western propaganda to keep you away from Islam. The early Muslims as the Muslims today were being attacked and harassed and they were told in the Quran to defend themselves. Those are the verses in the Quran writers like this one uses to make you believe, we are 'violent.' What a joke. Wake up and read the Quran or talk to a Muslim if you want real knowledge. If you want to HATE then buy her book and hate. What a lovely gathering. I feel sorry for this woman. I am happy in Islam and will never leave it. (American Muslim 21 years, living in ME) all praise and thanks to our Creator, Allah.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 26, 2012

    This book is good for explaining the forces of hate that are com

    This book is good for explaining the forces of hate that are coming against America, but for the average reader, there are too many details that begin to run together and all sound the same from about the middle of the book to the end. I totally agree with the author, but feel that too many facts crammed into the book becomes redundant. Her point could have been made with the collective facts spread over fewer chapters and then moved on to other facts such as explaining more about how these forces treat women and children, how they infiltrate homes and society in general, and how they convince those suicide bombers to actually carry through their evil intentions. Are these people so illiterate that they believe anything? In response to "I Am Amazed"; one only has to examine the nightly news to know that the Muslim religion is a force of evil despite those who would try to make the "politically correct" acceptance of such war-mongering. It is the same thing Hitler did....tell the biggest lie you can think of to cover your tracks and the people will believe it because the truth is just too difficult to accept.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2012

    She's obviously a Lebanese Maronite that's being published only

    She's obviously a Lebanese Maronite that's being published only because she can fool people with low education on foreign matters into believing she is some sort of Muslim going against her own religion and "exposing" it for what it is. Except there's only one problem with that ... Hanan Tudor aka "Brigitte Gabriel" the false "American" with blue contacts and her republican haircut isn't fooling anyone with any sort of education on the matter. She can only fool stupid people that live out in the middle of nebraska, watch faux news all day and have no real world experience outside of living in their suburban home and going to church on sundays.

    Basically a hateful Islamophobia spewing demon

    her hate against Islam is so transparent and just look at the wickedness in her eyes, she has no conscience so why would anyone want to buy a book written by a Bigot ? Because Americans love fear, they need a new boogyman every decade or so, whether it be communists, the jihadis, satan whatever it is they need it in their lives to feel like they aren't just who they fear, that they themselves aren't the boogymen, the terrorists, the communists, satan etc. "We see things not as they are, we see things as we are"

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 13, 2012

    Because SHE hates

    This is a book written by a woman who is still that hurt and frightened little girl she once was. Gabriel hasn't grown up, nor has she been properly educated...

    Her knowledge of history is sadly lacking. She doesn't even truly understand (as much as one can such things) the civil war that took place in Lebanon.

    Her sources are terrible! She mostly tries to quote websites (any college educated person should know that websites, if cited should be left to only a very, very, few). Where are the primary sources? Even if you were to look up her sources you would see she paraphrases beyond what would be acceptable! She changes important facts to stories! Many of the links cited no longer show up (such is the way of the internet) but that just makes one have to question even more how she quoted or paraphrased from such sites.

    If this is what is to become of scholarly work in the future, God help us all!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 51 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)