Bird in a Box

Bird in a Box

4.5 4
by Andrea Davis Pinkney
     
 

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Otis, Willie, and Hibernia are three children with a lot in common: they've all lost a loved one, they each have secret dreams, and they won't stop fighting for what they want. And they're also a lot like their hero, famed boxer Joe Louis. Throughout this moving novel, their lives gradually converge to form friendship, family, and love. Their trials and

Overview

Otis, Willie, and Hibernia are three children with a lot in common: they've all lost a loved one, they each have secret dreams, and they won't stop fighting for what they want. And they're also a lot like their hero, famed boxer Joe Louis. Throughout this moving novel, their lives gradually converge to form friendship, family, and love. Their trials and triumphs echo those of Joe Louis, as he fights to become the heavyweight boxing champion.

Andrea Pinkney masterfully weaves in factual information about Joe Louis and actual radio commentary from his fights, enriching the narrative of this uniquely rendered and beautifully written novel.

Editorial Reviews

David Margolick
…a powerful middle-grade novel…with tenderness and verve, it tells the stories of three 12-year-old black children, Hibernia, Otis and Willie, in Depression-era Elmira, N.Y.
—The New York Times
Publishers Weekly

Preface ix

About the Editors xi

Contributors xiii

Section I Introduction: Importance of an Integrative Approach to Child Therapy 1

Chapter 1 History of Psychotherapy Integration and Related Research 3
JohnW. Seymour

Chapter 2 Integrating Play Therapy Theories Into Practice 21
Athena A. Drewes

Section II Integrative Play Therapies for Externalizing Disorders of Childhood 37

Chapter 3 Parent-Child Interaction Therapy for Oppositional Behavior in Children: Integration of Child-Directed Play Therapy and Behavior Management Training for Parents 39
Amanda H. Costello, Karishma Chengappa, Jocelyn O. Stokes, Ashley B. Tempel, and Cheryl B. McNeil

Chapter 4 Integration of Sandtray Therapy and Solution-Focused Techniques for Treating Noncompliant Youth 61
Daniel S. Sweeney

Chapter 5 Holistic Expressive Play Therapy: An Integrative Approach to Helping Maltreated Children 75
Marie-JoséDhaese

Chapter 6 Social Skills Play Groups for Children With Disruptive Behavior Disorders: Integrating Play and Group Therapy Approaches 95
Julie Blundon Nash and Charles E. Schaefer

Section III Integrative Play Therapies for Internalizing Disorders of Childhood 105

Chapter 7 Cognitive-Behavioral Play Therapy for Traumatized Children: Narrowing the Divide Between Ideology and Evidence 107
Janine Shelby and Karina G. Campos

Chapter 8 The Worry Wars: A Protocol for Treating Childhood Anxiety Disorders 129
Paris Goodyear-Brown

Chapter 9 Filial Therapy for Maltreated and Neglected Children: Integration of Family Therapy and Play Therapy 153
Risse VanFleet and Glade Topham

Chapter 10 Integrating Art Into Play Therapy for Children With Mood Disorders 177
Sarah Hamil

Chapter 11 Integrating Play Therapy and EMDR With Children: A Post-Trauma Intervention 195
Victoria A. McGuinness

Chapter 12 Utilizing Bibliotherapy Within Play Therapy for Children With Anxieties and Fears 207
Dale-Elizabeth Pehrsson

Chapter 13 Integrating Cognitive-Behavioral Play Therapy and Adlerian Play Therapy Into the Treatment of Perfectionism 225
Jeffrey S. Ashby and Christina Noble

Section IV Integrating Play Therapy for Attachment Disorders of Children 241

Chapter 14 Playing for Keeps: Integrating Family and Play Therapy to Treat Reactive Attachment Disorder 243
Kyle N.Weir

Chapter 15 Integrating Attachment Theory and Nondirective Play Therapy to Treat Children With More Serious Attachment Problems 265
Jessica Jäger and Virginia Ryan

Chapter 16 Integrating Ecosystemic Play Therapy and Theraplay in the Treatment of Attachment Disorders 297
Kevin O’Connor

Chapter 17 Integration of Child-Centered Play Therapy and Theraplay 325
Evangeline Munns

Chapter 18 An Integrative Humanistic Play Therapy Approach to Treating Adopted Children With a History of Attachment Disruptions 341
Sue C. Bratton, Kara Carnes-Holt, and Peggy L. Ceballos

Author Index 371

Subject Index 381

School Library Journal
Gr 4–7—It is 1936, and the country is struggling in the midst of the Great Depression. As Joe Louis inches closer to becoming the American heavyweight boxing champion, his victories spark hope in a nation starved for good news. Against this backdrop, Pinkney introduces three narrators whose lives are about to intersect. Hibernia chafes at her father's overprotectiveness: since her mother left them with dreams of singing at the Savoy, the reverend limits Hibernia's singing to the church choir. Otis misses his parents terribly: the three of them never had much, but they had laughter, which came to an end in a fiery car crash. Willie tries to ignore his alcoholic father until the night that the abusive man disfigures Willie's hands and his mother convinces him to flee for safety. The two boys meet at the Mercy Home for Negro Orphans and slowly learn to trust one another. When Hibernia's youth choir performs a Christmas concert there, Otis is smitten. With the help of a caring orphanage worker, the three youngsters are able to navigate the complex waters of adolescence, learning that using one's wits can be more powerful than beating against the walls of a box. Pinkney weaves quite a bit of 1930s history into her story and succeeds admirably in showing how Louis came to represent so much more than his sport. Her detailed notes make this an accessible and inspiring piece of historical fiction that belongs in most collections.—Kim Dare, Fairfax County Public Schools, VA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781613832974
Publisher:
Perfection Learning Corporation
Publication date:
03/26/2013
Pages:
281
Product dimensions:
7.50(w) x 5.10(h) x 1.00(d)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Read an Excerpt

Athena A. Drewes, PsyD, MA, RPT-S, has almost thirty years of clinical experience in play therapy, working with children and adolescents across all types of treatment settings. She is Director of Clinical Training and APA Internship at Astor Services for Children and Families. She served six years as Director of the Association for Play Therapy and is founder and Director of The Play Therapy Institute, LLC.

Sue C. Bratton, PhD, LPC, RPT-S, is a Professor and Director of the University of North Texas Center for Play Therapy. She has written numerous chapters on play therapy and related journal articles, and is a renowned play therapy trainer and workshop presenter.

Charles E. Schaefer, PhD, RPT-S, is Professor Emeritus of Psychology at Fairleigh Dickinson University. He is cofounder and Director Emeritus of the Association for Play Therapy. He is also the founder and Codirector of the Play Therapy Training Institute in New Jersey.

Meet the Author

Andrea Pinkney is the author of many award-winning books for children. Many were collaborations with her husband, illustrator Brian Pinkney. She is also an editor at Scholastic. They live in Brooklyn with their two children.

Sean Qualls is the illustrator of a number of celebrated books for children, including Before John Was a Jazz Giant by Carole Boston Weatherford, for which he received a Coretta Scott King Illustrator Honor, and Dizzy by Jonah Winter, an ALA Notable Book, a Kirkus Best Book, and a School Library Journal Best Book of the Year. He has also illustrated Little Cloud and Lady Wind by Toni Morrison and her son Slade and Giant Steps to Change The World by Spike and Tonya Lee, which will be published in January 2011. Sean lives with his wife, illustrator Selina Alko, and their two children in Brooklyn, NY.

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Bird in a Box 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This ricks click yes if u agree
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Jefferie Renegar More than 1 year ago
This is a wonderful story set in 1936. The story and characters draw you in from the start. This book should easily be considered for a Coretta Scott King award.
Helen Owen More than 1 year ago
Hi