The Changeling

The Changeling

4.3 7
by Robin Jenkins
     
 

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The changeling of the title is Tom Curdie, the product of a Glasgow slum. Thirteen years old, he is on probation for theft. His teachers admit him to be clever, but only one, Charles Forbes, sees in his reticence and in his seemingly insolent smile a magnanimity uncanny in a child. He decides to take Tom on holiday with his own family. And the effect of his decision…  See more details below

Overview

The changeling of the title is Tom Curdie, the product of a Glasgow slum. Thirteen years old, he is on probation for theft. His teachers admit him to be clever, but only one, Charles Forbes, sees in his reticence and in his seemingly insolent smile a magnanimity uncanny in a child. He decides to take Tom on holiday with his own family. And the effect of his decision is the subject of this powerful book.

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From the Publisher

"A remarkable writer."  —Times

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781847672384
Publisher:
Canongate UK
Publication date:
04/03/2008
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
240
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 7.70(h) x 0.70(d)

Meet the Author


Robin Jenkins, the author of a number of novels including Childish Things and Just Duffy, is recognized as one of Scotland's greatest writers. The themes of good and evil, of innocence lost, of fraudulence, cruelty, and redemption shine through his work. His novels, shot through with ambiguity, are rarely about what they seem. He published his first book, So Gaily Sings the Lark, at the age of 30, and by the time of his death in 2005, more than 30 of his novels were in print.

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The Changeling (Wormling Series #3) 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great books!!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
These are an excellent series. Most of the time I couldn't put it down. The way the author talks to the reader is my favorite part.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It's not entirely original for a recent work of fiction to contain an allegorical tale of the end times, so we're probably not surprised with  the arrival of the Wormling series. A Christian series, in fact. I fortunately didn't buy these books, but borrowed them to read  and discovered they're quite simply a waste of time. Let me explain. Most of us are probably familiar with The Lord of the Rings, Chronicles of Narnia, and other classic fantasy based stories. These bringing  to light some moral points possibly through some biblical analogy. It seems like that may have been the author(s) plan which unfortunately got side-tracked as they got caught up in the story they were creating.  Yeah, creating. One thing they never tired of was making up new creatures to do their dirty work, namely, to serve the "baddies"  and hurt the "good guys". Hideous creature after hideous creature romp through the pages. Some are barely described and others ignored as you wonder what they look like. A few of the characters on the side of the good fall in this vague place as well, though one is described as having the face of a dog and a rat, thick fur (sheep, dog, whatever?), and hooves of a goat---though not in as many words. Come on!  They seemed afraid to copy characters/creatures most of us would be familiar with and made up their own (that Erol was a  dwarf/Munchkin/elf/what the heck?! The author(s) apparently made up much of these 5 books as they wrote them and they weren't secure  in what they were telling.  The last book is by far the worst: the writers hinting, maybe warning the reader at the coming atrocities, yet reveling in the telling.  Okay, I know things are terrible and will be for all evil, especially as written in Revelation, but the disturbing accounts here are appalling.  "And her blood", says the Dragon, "shall anoint my throne!" Page after page we hear the same gory phrase repeated carelessly till it's  annoying.  Out-of-place modern analogies only contributed to the jumble of confusion. There was even some bathroom humor thrown in,  more than likely to appeal to greater crowds of readers. Yet people call this 'clean!' Toilet jokes are not clean, folks!!  This is more than appalling in Christian juvenile fiction and probably just another ploy to sell more of this drivel.  Chapters are short, only to keep the story moving---and it does, but only on confusing trips seemingly only meant to fill the pages. This is not intended to be a comparison review but if you want a true Christian fiction fantasy, read The Door Within trilogy. Don't read the Wormling series. And please don't give it to your kids.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great books.I loved them.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Jerry b jenkins has done it again. This is an amazing book. Looooooooove it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago