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Chloe Doe
     

Chloe Doe

4.0 21
by Suzanne Phillips
 

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Chloe Doe chronicles a 17-year-old girl's tumultuous path to becoming a prostitute and her ultimate transformation back into mainstream society. During her therapy at Madeline Parker Institute for Girls, Chloe slowly reveals aspects of her painful past--the stepfather who abused her sister, the mother who let it all happen, the need to love and be loved--and faces the

Overview

Chloe Doe chronicles a 17-year-old girl's tumultuous path to becoming a prostitute and her ultimate transformation back into mainstream society. During her therapy at Madeline Parker Institute for Girls, Chloe slowly reveals aspects of her painful past--the stepfather who abused her sister, the mother who let it all happen, the need to love and be loved--and faces the future she finally decides to build for herself. Told in heart-wrenching language that's sometimes caustic, often ironic, and always authentic, Chloe Doe is certain to find a place among classics about teens that triumph over their loneliness and desperation to find hope.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Sitting through months of probing therapy sessions can be an intense experience-especially when you're not the patient. In her abused-girl-on-the-run story, debut novelist Phillips piles on the requisite ingredients of a teenage melodrama: sexual abuse, prostitution, an incompetent mother and a brief stint in foster care. The story begins as 17-year-old Chloe is placed in the Madeline Parker Institute for Girls following an arrest for prostitution. She is belligerent, indignant and won't open up to anyone. But as her therapist chips away at her steely exterior, Chloe begins to reveal memories she never thought she'd share with anyone: her mother's dizzying train of live-in boyfriends, her stepfather's wandering hands and the first time she pleasures a john for money after running away from home. As Chloe relives each of these moments from her past, teens are given full access to her thoughts and emotions, thanks to Phillips's clear understanding of Chloe's tough yet vulnerable character. Unfortunately, the most shocking revelation of all-the reason Chloe severs ties with her family in the first place-isn't explained until the very end, which may leave many to wish they had learned the truth earlier. An exhausting but nonetheless authentic read. Ages 15-up. (June)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
VOYA - Robin Guedel
In this story of a seventeen-year-old girl who finds herself on the wrong side of the tracks, Chloe gives herself the generic last name of Doe after she is been sent to a group home for girls when arrested for prostitution. Chloe narrates the story, alternating back and forth between her daily activities with other female misfits and her life growing up with her sister Camille. After many long sessions with a psychiatrist, Chloe begins to see a light at the end of a very long tunnel. In this debut novel, Phillips provides an intense but fulfilling read. A translation guide at the beginning of the book of the common Spanish words that Chloe uses throughout makes for smoother reading. Phillips is excellent at letting the story of Chloe's troubled childhood unfold with just enough mystery to keep the reader engaged. The sessions that Chloe has with her psychiatrist are powerful as Chloe uncovers her fears and what got her to this low point in her life. This book is ideal for older teens who might come from troubled families or who have had some tough experiences in their lives. It is an inspirational story, offering hope that everyone can have a second chance.
KLIATT - Myrna Marler
Take a 17-year-old girl, a genius who loves to read, and let her tell the story of how she became a teenage prostitute and what life is like in the Madeline Parker Institute for Girls where she's been confined until she's "well" enough to go back out on her own. The tone and voice might be very much like this novel, often non-linear, by turns cynical and yearning, and flattened emotionally because of the traumas of the past. In the end, thanks to the patience and attention of Chloe's psychiatrist and her own innate desire to live, Chloe becomes open to the potential of life. Because of its non-linear style, the suspense regarding what happened to turn Chloe into the girl who will have sex with anyone who feeds her and gives her a place to sleep builds at the same time as her relationship with the psychiatrist turns from edgy and hostile to one of trust. The language is sharp and engaging, even lyrical at times, and her emergence from a kind of living death (she sleeps in a coffin-like cardboard box in a room without windows) into a life with direction and purpose, but not without tragedy and disappointment, is believable. The themes are, of course, overcoming loss and having the courage to turn away from the hardened shell Chloe has so carefully constructed in order to survive. The novel is both moving and gritty, completely avoiding easy sentimentality.
Kirkus Reviews
"Doe" is the last name Chloe has adopted for herself, a label of anonymity that separates her from her mother and her mother's string of worthless boyfriends. After a traumatic incident at home, which Chloe doesn't reveal until near the end of the story, Chloe runs away from home and makes a living as a prostitute until she's picked up by the police. Because she's underage, she's given the choice of juvenile hall or the Madeline Parker Hospital. A toss of a coin sends her to Madeline Parker, where a compassionate doctor and highly structured living help Chloe to face the monsters of her past. In spare dialogue and memories, she tells a story of abuse and murder, and through therapy she begins to gain the courage to go back into the world and, as she puts it, live. Although Chloe's voice is often wise beyond her years, even given her life experience, readers will stay with Chloe's story. This hard look at one life in a lockdown facility may appeal to fans of Adam Rapp and Ellen Hopkins. (Fiction. YA)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780316040969
Publisher:
Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
Publication date:
10/01/2008
Sold by:
Hachette Digital, Inc.
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
553 KB
Age Range:
15 - 18 Years

Meet the Author

Suzanne Phillips is a special education English teacher in San Diego, CA. Chloe Doe is her first novel.

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Chloe Doe 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 21 reviews.
TeensReadToo More than 1 year ago
CHLOE DOE is a wrenching, unflinching portrayal of a girl on the fringes of society. On and off the street since the age of eleven, having worked as a prostitute for most of that time, seventeen-year-old Chloe has little patience for the attempts of The Madeline Parker Institute for Girls to reform her. However, as she speaks with the institute's "shrink" and starts to bond with the other girls, she realizes there may be more to life than what she's assumed is her lot.

Chloe, who narrates the story in chapters set in the institute and flashbacks to her life before she ran away from home, has a sharp, engaging voice that will grip readers quickly and bring them into her world. As her story unfolds, those shocked by her situation will come to understand it. Despite her untouchable front, Chloe slowly reveals all the pain and fear that lie underneath, making her sympathetic even though her outlook is so different from that of most teens. Her love for her older sister in particular makes her human and achingly believable.

The novel doesn't shy away from the harsh details of Chloe's life. Thankfully, it manages to relate her awful and sometimes tragic experiences without falling into melodrama or playing up for shock value. Everything is stated simply and directly. While the narrative rarely goes into graphic detail, enough is shown and the rest is skillfully implied to make it clear that Chloe's path has been far from an easy one. This makes her attempts to open up and escape her narrow, hopeless world-view all the more poignant and heroic. As the scenes in the present and the past lead up to the final revelation of what drove her from her home, the reader will be glued to the page. The ending, when it comes, is hopeful without being maudlin or unrealistic.

That realism, ultimately, is what makes CHLOE DOE worthwhile. It acknowledges both the good and the bad, letting readers make their own judgments about Chloe and her life. Many will find themselves wondering, how would they have reacted, if things had gone a similar way for them? Could they have done better? Could they, in the end, rise above it? Chloe's story will inspire them with the idea that no matter how far one falls, there is always hope.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is most definatly the one of the saddest books I've ever read. It talks about 17-year-old Chloe Doe who is a teenage prostitute. She gets caught by the police and is sent to this girl's home to get better. There, she talks about her childhood, growing up with a slutty mother and a sister. She also talks about her meetings with the psychiatrist and the people she meets at this home 'mostly about a girl who she calls 'Niña' who had been having sex with her brother because he told her he was Jesus, she was Mary and they were saving the world'. I won't give away the ending, but it's heartwrentching and almost brought tears to my eyes, when I haven't cried reading a book since Johnny Cade and Dally Winston died in The Outsiders. Basically, if you're looking for fluff, stay far, far away from this book. But if you enjoy a good story, pick it up.
Ashley Drakes More than 1 year ago
It ended so quick
neekie baniagrr More than 1 year ago
A great story about a teen over coming her painful past, really sad and heart warming at the same time.
Selchie More than 1 year ago
I just finished readng this book yesterday and to say the least the ending made me think. Chloe is a strong,independent lead character with a horrible past. Her story is filled with abuse,neglect but in the end she finds the courage to make it right. I reccomend this story to anyone looking for an inspirational tale of a girl finding herself through her past.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read Chloe Doe a few weeks ago and i adored it. It is a captivating story of a former prostitute in an institute for troubled girls. Her story is told in flashbacks and through her theraphy sessions. The book keeps you on the edge of your seat, while forcing you to try to fit the puzzle pieces of the story together. I read the book in a day, it was phenomenal. I would recommend this book to anyone. :)
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