×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Compass Point/I've Got Something to Say
     

Compass Point/I've Got Something to Say

by David Allan Coe
 
The pairing of Compass Point and I've Got Something to Say is the oddest of the two-fers issued by Bear Family as volume five in their David Allan Coe Columbia retrospective. On his ninth and tenth albums for Columbia, Coe was still looking for respect from radio program directors in Nash Vegas and nationwide -- and wasn't getting it, despite the ace

Overview

The pairing of Compass Point and I've Got Something to Say is the oddest of the two-fers issued by Bear Family as volume five in their David Allan Coe Columbia retrospective. On his ninth and tenth albums for Columbia, Coe was still looking for respect from radio program directors in Nash Vegas and nationwide -- and wasn't getting it, despite the ace production team of Billy Sherrill and Ron Bledsoe. Compass Point is the most reflective of Coe's albums in the sense that it seemingly constantly looks back to the previous, and most of that isn't pretty; in fact, it's full of regret and remorse, but the determination to transcend as well. The percussion tracks are straight out of Jimmy Buffett's classic records and the atmospherics are pure Sherrill -- phased guitars and accordions and fiddles shimmering in and out of the mix. Two of the finest songs on the album are "Gone (Like)" and "Loving Her (Will Make You Lose Your Mind)." I've Got Something to Say is Coe's star-guest album -- a blatant attempt for radio airplay (it says so in the liner notes) that doesn't work at all. From the re-recording of "This Bottle (In My Hand)," with George Jones (given that this was recorded in 1980, when Jones was a recently recovering alcoholic, it's tasteless) to the re-recording of "Take This Job and Shove It," done as a reaction to the film of the same name, the songs are more boisterous than inspired. "Take It Easy Rider," with Guy Clark, sounds more confused and lost than anything else, and "Hank Williams Junior-Junior" with the Allman Brothers' Dickey Betts and Kris Kristofferson is a bad -- no, make that terrible -- novelty song. This is the only case in which it is too bad that a very decent outing like Compass Point was paired with such a poor one.

Product Details

Release Date:
05/02/1995
Label:
Bear Family
UPC:
4000127158413
catalogNumber:
15841
Rank:
18515

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

David Allan Coe   Primary Artist,Guitar,Vocals
Bill Anderson   Vocals
Guy Clark   Vocals
George Jones   Vocals
Kris Kristofferson   Vocals
Buddy Spicher   Fiddle
Ladysmith Black Mambazo   Vocal Harmony
Dickey Betts   Guitar
Pete Drake   Pedal Steel Guitar
Rattlesnake Annie   Vocal Harmony
Owen "Boomer" Castleman   Banjo
Dale Seigfreid   Guitar
Larry Jon Wilson   Vocals

Technical Credits

David Allan Coe   Producer
Ken Bell   Contributor
Ron Bledsoe   Producer
Chalmers Davis   Contributor
Shane Keister   Contributor
Jimmy English   Contributor
Ralph Ezell   Contributor
Owen Hale   Contributor
Alan Hicks   Contributor
Kenny Malone   Contributor
Steve Nathan   Contributor
Billy Sherrill   Producer
Henry Strzelecki   Contributor
Wesley Taylor   Contributor
Reggie Young   Contributor
R.A. Andreas   Illustrations
Richard Weize   Reissue Producer,Tape Research
Sylke Holtrop   Artwork
Gerd Weiler   Artwork
Mike Barton   Contributor
Miles Costin   Contributor
George Heard   Contributor
Theodore W Irwin   Contributor
Leon Petty   Contributor

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews