Disrupting Class: How Disruptive Innovation Will Change the Way the World Learns / Edition 2 by Clayton Christensen, Curtis W. Johnson, Michael B. Horn | | 9780071749107 | Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
Disrupting Class: How Disruptive Innovation Will Change the Way the World Learns / Edition 2

Disrupting Class: How Disruptive Innovation Will Change the Way the World Learns / Edition 2

3.8 12
by Clayton Christensen, Curtis W. Johnson, Michael B. Horn
     
 

ISBN-10: 0071749101

ISBN-13: 9780071749107

Pub. Date: 08/20/2010

Publisher: McGraw-Hill Professional Publishing

Clay Christensen's groundbreaking bestselling work in education now updated and expanded, including a new chapter on Christensen's seminal "Jobs to Be Done" theory applied to education.

"Provocatively titled, Disrupting Class is just what America's K-12 education system needs--a well thought-through proposal for using technology to better serve

Overview

Clay Christensen's groundbreaking bestselling work in education now updated and expanded, including a new chapter on Christensen's seminal "Jobs to Be Done" theory applied to education.

"Provocatively titled, Disrupting Class is just what America's K-12 education system needs--a well thought-through proposal for using technology to better serve students and bring our schools into the 21st Century. Unlike so many education 'reforms,' this is not small-bore stuff. For that reason alone, it's likely to be resisted by defenders of the status quo, even though it's necessary and right for our kids. We owe it to them to make sure this book isn't merely a terrific read; it must become a blueprint for educational transformation."

—Joel Klein, Chancellor of the New York City Department of Education

"A brilliant teacher, Christensen brings clarity to a muddled and chaotic world of education."

—Jim Collins, bestselling author of Good to Great

“Just as iTunes revolutionized the music industry, technology has the potential to transform education in America so that every one of the nation’s 50 million students receives a high quality education. Disrupting Class is a must-read, as it shows us how we can blaze that trail toward transformation.”
—Jeb Bush, former Governor of Florida

According to recent studies in neuroscience, the way we learn doesn't always match up with the way we are taught. If we hope to stay competitive-academically, economically, and technologically-we need to rethink our understanding of intelligence, reevaluate our educational system, and reinvigorate our commitment to learning. In other words, we need "disruptive innovation."

Now, in his long-awaited new book, Clayton M. Christensen and coauthors Michael B. Horn and Curtis W. Johnson take one of the most important issues of our time-education-and apply Christensen's now-famous theories of "disruptive" change using a wide range of real-life examples. Whether you're a school administrator, government official, business leader, parent, teacher, or entrepreneur, you'll discover surprising new ideas, outside-the-box strategies, and straight-A success stories. You'll learn how:

  • Customized learning will help many more students succeed in school
  • Student-centric classrooms will increase the demand for new technology
  • Computers must be disruptively deployed to every student
  • Disruptive innovation can circumvent roadblocks that have prevented other attempts at school reform
  • We can compete in the global classroom-and get ahead in the global market

Filled with fascinating case studies, scientific findings, and unprecedented insights on how innovation must be managed, Disrupting Class will open your eyes to new possibilities, unlock hidden potential, and get you to think differently. Professor Christensen and his coauthors provide a bold new lesson in innovation that will help you make the grade for years to come.

The future is now. Class is in session.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780071749107
Publisher:
McGraw-Hill Professional Publishing
Publication date:
08/20/2010
Pages:
272
Sales rank:
198,725
Product dimensions:
9.50(w) x 11.08(h) x 1.00(d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments v

Introduction 1

Randall Circle High School 19

Chapter 1 Why Schools Struggle to Teach Differently When Each Student Learns Differently 21

Chapter 2 Making the Shift: Schools Meet Society's Jobs 43

Chapter 3 Crammed Classroom Computers 71

Chapter 4 Disruptively Deploying Computers 89

Chapter 5 The System for Student-Centric Learning 121

Chapter 6 The Impact of the Earliest Years on Student's Success 147

Chapter 7 Why So Many Students Seem Unmotivated 159

Chapter 8 Improving Education Research 183

Chapter 9 Organizing to Innovate 205

Conclusion 241

Index 249

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Disrupting Class 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Love-a-good-thriller More than 1 year ago
Clayton Christensen offers a believable and intuitive approach to fixing our staggering American educational system. In a nutshell: people learn in different ways (no surprise here; it's a well-documented theory). Teachers too often teach one way (or two or three--the point being, teachers standardize. I understand. I've been a teacher most of my life. One of us and many of them in a classroom). His solution: Use 21st century technology and Web 2.0 to individualize lessons to suit needs. That's where the problem starts according to Christensen. Schools throw technology at their problems in hopes software, hardware, internet websites, will fix their shrinking test scores. Every technology teacher I know agrees with the author that this approach is flawed and frustrates both students and teachers. Technology is a tool, to be wielded with a skilled hand. Christensen gives teachers permission to disrupt class--shake it up! See what's going on. Here are some of my favorite ideas: 1) If the addition of computers to classrooms were a cure, there would be evidence of it by now. There is not. Test scores have barely budged. 2) Why haven't schools (with so much emphasis on technology) been able to march down this path (of student-centric learning)? ...because they have crammed the new technologies into their existing structure... 3) The world of education is one in which there is little agreement on what the goals are, let alone the methods that are best-suited to achieve them. 4) Public schools have been improving steadily, since 1900, but society moved the goal posts ...changed the definition of improvement... I'd recommend this to any teacher intent upon integrating technology into their core curriculum.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The idea that education reform comes from the minority - those that are on the outside edges of the spectrum - is fascinating. It is encouraging to explore the possibilities of how educators and students can properly use technology to their advantage. Transforming the role of the teacher is not only possible, but necessary if we are wanting to reach different results. The idea that learning can be an individual process, rather than a strictly a group process is refreshing. This book had been recommended to me by several educators and administrators and I'm greatful to have read it. It has given me a fresh set of eyes to approaching some of the problems we are facing today.
Booknut62 More than 1 year ago
I became fascinated by the boasts of the subtitle of this book: "How Disruptive Innovation Will Change the Way the World Learns." That is a fairly powerful claim. After being entangled in the authors' fanciful charts and background information, I began to look forward to some miraculous new disclosure on this new innovation that will transform the world of learning. I was disappointed. At its best this book offers some interesting theories on innovation in general. At its worst, it argues that technology-based, student centric instructional tools are going to take over the educational world, and according to the authors, this will happen by 2014. (I haven't yet figured out where that specific timeline comes from.) In the nineties there were individuals who predicted that computers would replace teachers. These authors believe that the role of teachers will be transformed to that of tutors. The whole idea of reducing learning into a software program has been tried. The reality is learning is a messy, complicated process, and just as the authors assert, no one process works. But, their belief in the salvation wrought through computer software alone may be misplaced. This book was disappointing because I thought it would offer some clearly applicable innovative ideas for my school. Instead, it promotes theories and ideas. It makes broad sweeps with generalizations and predictions, but offers very little that is practical for the school practitioner.
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RolfDobelli More than 1 year ago
The very real value of this useful and, at times, pleasantly surprising book comes from the way the authors apply their expertise in innovation to the field of education. By approaching public education's crisis with new eyes - and conceptualizing education as a product or service like any other - Clayton M. Christensen (The Innovator's Dilemma), Michael B. Horn and Curtis W. Johnson provide insights that escape the tired loops of argument that often define discussions about public education. These writers' obvious willingness to look in new directions for learning innovation is matched by their genuine concern for everyone involved in education. However, they do seem a bit idealistic, as they focus so strongly on the pedagogical and conceptual aspects of education that they seem to skim over other concerns, like logistics and budgets. The authors acknowledge the legal monopoly governing public education without really addressing the social weight and inertia of such a monopoly. In fact, they seem to believe that positive disruption is almost inevitable. getAbstract recommends this thoughtful book to anyone interested in social change and education, and - not tangentially - in how new technologies affect societies.