Hunger
  • Hunger
  • Hunger

Hunger

Director: Tony Scott

Cast: Catherine Deneuve, David Bowie, Susan Sarandon

     
 

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The exquisitely beautiful Catherine Deneuve plays Miriam, a centuries-old vampire capable of bestowing the gift of immortality on her lovers -- namely her current partner John (David Bowie). To sustain their sanguinary requirements, the pair cruises New York nightclubs in search of victims (as illustrated in a stunning opening sequence to the accompaniment of "Bela… See more details below

Overview

The exquisitely beautiful Catherine Deneuve plays Miriam, a centuries-old vampire capable of bestowing the gift of immortality on her lovers -- namely her current partner John (David Bowie). To sustain their sanguinary requirements, the pair cruises New York nightclubs in search of victims (as illustrated in a stunning opening sequence to the accompaniment of "Bela Lugosi's Dead" performed by seminal Goth band Bauhaus). When John awakens one morning to discover telltale signs of aging, it is revealed that his own sustained youth is not permanent, and his physical decrepitude begins to increase at an incredible rate. In a panic, John visits the clinic of scientist Sarah Roberts (Susan Sarandon), who has recently published a book on reversing the aging process, but she initially dismisses him as a crank, leaving him to sit in the lobby for several hours... during which his body ages several decades. After learning of his condition, Sarah traces John to his uptown flat. John is nowhere to be found, having been consigned by Miriam to a box in the attic with her legions of undead loves, leaving Miriam to deal with Sarah -- which she does quite effectively, seducing her into a steamy lesbian tryst. Their passion is consummated by a mingling of Miriam's blood with Sarah's, which later manifests itself as a psychic link between the two women and leaves Sarah with a rapidly-increasing appetite for blood.

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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Ed Hulse
Tony Scott's stylish 1983 vampire film, adapted from a Whitley Streiber novel, was dismissed by one critic as "kinky trash," but within a few short years of its theatrical run The Hunger had acquired a cult following, and its DVD release is bound to excite the movie's loyal fans. Contemporary critics weren't thrilled to see distinguished French actress Catherine Deneuve playing a bloodsucker, no matter how elegant, and having counter-culture icon David Bowie for her on-screen companion didn't sit well with genre film partisans hoping for a more mainstream treatment. Deneuve and Bowie play wealthy New Yorkers whose need of human blood as an anti-aging element forces them into progressively riskier encounters; when regular ingestion of plasma fails to retard Bowie's aging, he calls upon acclaimed author/doctor Susan Sarandon to help him. The fetching physician finds herself drawn into their bizarre world and, in the film's much-discussed love scene, Deneuve's Sapphic embrace. Director Scott, making his initial leap from TV commercials to feature films, opts for a visual treatment that favor elaborate, smoky settings and gauzy cinematography. The Hunger, its narrative anomalies aside, is one of the most sensual films of its type, similar to the sex-horror hybrids popularized by European filmmakers in the early '70s. It's a bizarrely compelling movie that certainly justifies the reputation it has acquired, and lovers of offbeat horror films will definitely want to add it to their collections.
All Movie Guide - Jason Buchanan
Though undeniably an exercise in style over substance from the opening frames, Tony Scott's languid exercise in gothic vampirism may disappoint those with little patience for arty overindulgence, though those with a taste for slow-burning decay may find The Hunger an involving study in the desperation for love and eternal youth. Vampire enthusiasts and Anne Rice followers drawn to the more romantic aspects of the mythology will likewise succumb to Catherine Denuve's seductive menace and David Bowie's otherworldly charismatic performance, with Susan Surandon offering a compelling turn as a doctor drawn in to the dark underworld while attempting to halt the vampiric Bowie's rapidly accelerated aging process. The distinctly seductive trio certainly makes for an interesting screen presence if nothing else, and despite frequent long stretches in which little is happening in terms of action, they are consistently compelling to watch. The scenes in which Bowie withers away into old age are rendered especially chilling given not only the actor's slowed and cautious mannerisms, but in some effectively convincing make-up by Dick Smith and co. In his feature directorial debut, Tony Scott had yet to develop a fully realized sense of storytelling, though by throwing out most preconceived notions of vampirism and focusing on the intense eroticism often merely hinted at in the majority of mainstream efforts, his inexperience actually benefits the film in terms of providing an eerily disconnected tone. Though the film does include an ample amount of bloodletting, the action here nevertheless flows like frozen molasses, a fact that may well leave many viewers with a hunger of their own.

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Product Details

Release Date:
08/18/2015
UPC:
0888574319793
Original Release:
1983
Rating:
R
Source:
Warner Archives
Sound:
[DTS 5.1-Channel Surround Sound]
Time:
1:36:00
Sales rank:
611

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Catherine Deneuve Miriam
David Bowie John
Susan Sarandon Sarah Roberts
Cliff De Young Tom Haver
Beth Ehlers Alice Cavender
Dan Hedaya Lt. Allegrezza
Rufus Collins Charlie Humphries
Suzanne Bertish Phyllis
James Aubrey Ron
Bauhaus Disco Group
Ann Magnuson Young Woman from Disco
Shane Rimmer Jelinek
Douglas Lambert TV Host
Bessie Love Lilybelle
John Pankow 1st Phone Booth Youth
Willem Dafoe Phone Booth Youths
Sophie Ward Girl in London House
Philip Sayer London House Couple
Lise Hilboldt Waiting Room Nurse
Michael Howe 1st Intern
Ed Wiley Intern
Allan Richards Cadaver

Technical Credits
Tony Scott Director
Howard Blake Musical Arrangement,Musical Direction/Supervision
John Bolz Sound/Sound Designer
Milena Canonero Costumes/Costume Designer
Maggie Cartier Casting
Clinton Cavers Art Director
James Costigan Screenwriter
Thomas Davis Screenwriter
Ivan Davis Screenwriter
Dick Smith Makeup Special Effects
Carl Fullerton Makeup Special Effects
Mary Goldberg Casting
Stephen Goldblatt Cinematographer
William Hassell Asst. Director
Denny Jaeger Score Composer
Ann Mollo Set Decoration/Design
Brian Morris Production Designer
Victoria Paul Art Director
Pamela Power Editor
Michel Rubini Score Composer
Richard Shepherd Producer
Michael Thomas Screenwriter
David Tringham Asst. Director
Clive Winter Sound/Sound Designer

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