Eating Animals

( 218 )

Overview

Jonathan Safran Foer spent much of his teenage and college years oscillating between omnivore and vegetarian. But on the brink of fatherhood-facing the prospect of having to make dietary choices on a child's behalf-his casual questioning took on an urgency  His quest for answers ultimately required him to visit factory farms in the middle of the night, dissect the emotional ingredients of meals from his childhood, and probe some of his most primal instincts about right and wrong. Brilliantly synthesizing ...

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Eating Animals

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Overview

Jonathan Safran Foer spent much of his teenage and college years oscillating between omnivore and vegetarian. But on the brink of fatherhood-facing the prospect of having to make dietary choices on a child's behalf-his casual questioning took on an urgency  His quest for answers ultimately required him to visit factory farms in the middle of the night, dissect the emotional ingredients of meals from his childhood, and probe some of his most primal instincts about right and wrong. Brilliantly synthesizing philosophy, literature, science, memoir and his own detective work, Eating Animals explores the many fictions we use to justify our eating habits-from folklore to pop culture to family traditions and national myth-and how such tales can lull us into a brutal forgetting. Marked by Foer's profound moral ferocity and unvarying generosity, as well as the vibrant style and creativity that made his previous books, Everything is Illuminated and Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, widely loved, Eating Animals is a celebration and a reckoning, a story about the stories we've told-and the stories we now need to tell. 

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  • Jonathan Safran Foer
    Jonathan Safran Foer  

Editorial Reviews

Philadelphia Daily News
"Eating Animals stands as a pop-cultural landmark, destined to be the starting point for a lot of overdue conversations."
All Things Considered NPR
"Eating Animals isn't just an anti-meat screed, or an impassioned case for vegetarianism. Instead, Foer tells a story that is part memoir and part investigative report....It's a book that takes America's meat-dominated diet to task."
MD Andrew Weil
"Foer's aim is not to make your choice, but to inform it. He has done us all a great service, and we, and the animals, owe him our thanks."
Publishers Weekly
Starred Review.

The latest from novelist Foer is a surprising but characteristically brilliant memoir-investigation, boasting an exhaustively-argued account of one man-child's decade-long struggle with vegetarianism. On the eve of becoming a father, Foer takes all the arguments for and against vegetarianism a neurotic step beyond and, to decide how to feed his coming baby, investigates everything from the intelligence level of our most popular meat providers-cattle, pigs, and poultry-to the specious self-justifications (his own included) for eating some meat products and not others. Foer offers a lighthearted counterpoint to his investigation in doting portraits of his loving grandmother, and her meat-and-potatoes comfort food, leaving him to wrestle with the comparative weight of food's socio-cultural significance and its economic-moral-political meaning. Without pulling any punches-factory farming is given the full expose treatment-Foer combines an array of facts, astutely-written anecdotes, and his furious, inward-spinning energy to make a personal, highly entertaining take on an increasingly visible (and book-selling) moral question; call it, perhaps, An Omnivore's Dilemma.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Kirkus Reviews
Celebrated novelist Foer (Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, 2005, etc.) examines the ethics and practical realities of eating things with faces. The author's first book-length work of nonfiction opens with a reminiscence of a grandmother who scraped for food to stay alive during the dark years of the Holocaust, yet refused to violate kashrut law to eat a proffered piece of pork, saying, "If nothing matters, there's nothing to save." Against that time of want and the food insecurity his grandmother expressed for the rest of her life, Foer examines this time of too-muchness, of cupboards full of luxuries and days full of meaty meals made possible by an elaborate system of factories, stockyards and slaughterhouses. "Eating animals," he writes, "is one of those topics, like abortion, where it is impossible to definitively know some of the most important details . . . and that cuts right to one's deepest discomforts, often provoking defensiveness or aggression." To his credit, the author is not shy of exploring his own discomforts while engaging in near-Talmudic analyses of the finer points of being a carnivore: If a pig is as smart as, if not smarter, than a dog and just as fond of playing with toys, then why aren't they allowed to curl up next to the fire with us? Of course, Foer allows, there are cultures where eating dogs is considered a good thing, though none that come to mind where having pigs as pets is common. Given the environmental costs of eating meat-"for every ten tuna, sharks, and other large predatory fish that were in our oceans fifty to a hundred years ago, only one is left"-and the looming sense that a time of scarcity is again in the offing, Foer's case for ethicalvegetarianism is wholly compelling. A blend of solid-and discomforting-reportage with fierce advocacy that will make committed carnivores squeal.
Susan Salter Reynolds
Some of our finest journalists (Michael Pollan, Eric Schlosser) and animal rights activists (Peter Singer, Temple Grandin)-not to mention Gandhi, Jesus, Pythagoras, Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, John Locke and Immanuel Kant (and so many others)-have hurled themselves against the question of eating meat and the moral issues inherent in killing animals for food. Foer, 32, in this, his first work of nonfiction, intrepidly joins their ranks...It is the kind of wisdom that, in all its humanity and clarity, deserves a place at the table with our greatest philosophers.
Los Angeles Times
Jennifer Schuessler - New York Times Book Review
"[Eating Animals] is a postmodern version of Peter Singer's 1975 manifesto Animal Liberation...Foer is the latest in a long line of distinguished literary vegetarians."
Susan Salter Reynolds - Los Angeles Times
"Some of our finest journalists Michael Pollan, Eric Schlosser and animal rights activists Peter Singer, Temple Grandin-not to mention Gandhi, Jesus, Pythagoras, Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, John Locke and Immanuel Kant and so many others-have hurled themselves against the question of eating meat and the moral issues inherent in killing animals for food. Foer, 32, in this, his first work of nonfiction, intrepidly joins their ranks...It is the kind of wisdom that, in all its humanity and clarity, deserves a place at the table with our greatest philosophers."
Entertainment Weekly
"Stirring....compelling, earnest...Foer brings an invigorating moral clarity to the topic."
Andrew Weil
Eating Animals carefully, deliberately, takes you through every relevant dimension of factory farming...One sees it from the inside, the outside, the moral high ground, the dithering consumer level, through Foer's family stories, from slaughterhouse workers, animal behaviorists, even from defenders of the system... Foer's aim is not to make your choice, but to inform it. He has done us all a great service, and we, and the animals, owe him our thanks.
The Huffington Post
Jennifer Schuessler
[Eating Animals] is a postmodern version of Peter Singer's 1975 manifesto Animal Liberation...Foer is the latest in a long line of distinguished literary vegetarians.
New York Times Book Review
Geoff Nicholson
A work of moral philosophy...After reading this book, it's hard to disagree [with Foer].
San Francisco Chronicle
Holly Silva
[Eating Animals] is extraordinarily thoughtful and intelligent, and reads more like philosophy than journalism.
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Geoff Nicholson - San Francisco Chronicle
"A work of moral philosophy...After reading this book, it's hard to disagree [with Foer]."
Holly Silva - St. Louis Post-Dispatch
"[Eating Animals] is extraordinarily thoughtful and intelligent, and reads more like philosophy than journalism."
J.M. Coetzee
"The everyday horrors of factory farming are evoked so vividly, and the case against the people who run the system presented so convincingly, that anyone who, after reading Foer's book, continues to consume the industry's products must be without a heart, or impervious to reason, or both."
Dr. Andrew Weil - The Huffington Post
"Eating Animals carefully, deliberately, takes you through every relevant dimension of factory farming...One sees it from the inside, the outside, the moral high ground, the dithering consumer level, through Foer's family stories, from slaughterhouse workers, animal behaviorists, even from defenders of the system... Foer's aim is not to make your choice, but to inform it. He has done us all a great service, and we, and the animals, owe him our thanks."
The Oprah Magazine O
PRAISE FOR EATING ANIMALS:

"For a hot young writer to train his sights on a subject as unpalatable as meat production and consumption takes raw nerve. What makes Eating Animals so unusual is vegetarian Foer's empathy for human meat eaters, his willingness to let both factory farmers and food reform activists speak for themselves, and his talent for using humor to sweeten a sour argument."

From the Publisher
PRAISE FOR EATING ANIMALS:

"For a hot young writer to train his sights on a subject as unpalatable as meat production and consumption takes raw nerve. What makes Eating Animals so unusual is vegetarian Foer's empathy for human meat eaters, his willingness to let both factory farmers and food reform activists speak for themselves, and his talent for using humor to sweeten a sour argument."—O, The Oprah Magazine

"The everyday horrors of factory farming are evoked so vividly, and the case against the people who run the system presented so convincingly, that anyone who, after reading Foer's book, continues to consume the industry's products must be without a heart, or impervious to reason, or both."
J.M. Coetzee

"Stirring....compelling, earnest...Foer brings an invigorating moral clarity to the topic."—Entertainment Weekly

"Eating Animals carefully, deliberately, takes you through every relevant dimension of factory farming...One sees it from the inside, the outside, the moral high ground, the dithering consumer level, through Foer's family stories, from slaughterhouse workers, animal behaviorists, even from defenders of the system... Foer's aim is not to make your choice, but to inform it. He has done us all a great service, and we, and the animals, owe him our thanks."—Dr. Andrew Weil, The Huffington Post

"[Eating Animals] is a postmodern version of Peter Singer's 1975 manifesto Animal Liberation...Foer is the latest in a long line of distinguished literary vegetarians."—Jennifer Schuessler, New York Times Book Review

"Some of our finest journalists (Michael Pollan, Eric Schlosser) and animal rights activists (Peter Singer, Temple Grandin)-not to mention Gandhi, Jesus, Pythagoras, Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, John Locke and Immanuel Kant (and so many others)-have hurled themselves against the question of eating meat and the moral issues inherent in killing animals for food. Foer, 32, in this, his first work of nonfiction, intrepidly joins their ranks...It is the kind of wisdom that, in all its humanity and clarity, deserves a place at the table with our greatest philosophers."—Susan Salter Reynolds, Los Angeles Times

"A work of moral philosophy...After reading this book, it's hard to disagree [with Foer]."—Geoff Nicholson, San Francisco Chronicle

"The latest from novelist Foer is a surprising but characteristically brilliant memoir-investigation, boasting an exhaustively-argued account of one man-child's decade-long struggle with vegetarianism...Without pulling any punches-factory farming is given the full expose treatment-Foer combines an array of facts, astutely-written anecdotes, and his furious, inward-spinning energy to make a personal, highly entertaining take on an increasingly visible...moral question; call it, perhaps, An Omnivore's Dilemma."—Publishers Weekly

"[Eating Animals] is extraordinarily thoughtful and intelligent, and reads more like philosophy than journalism."—Holly Silva, St. Louis Post-Dispatch

"Foer's case for ethical vegetarianism is wholly compelling...A blend of solid-and discomforting-reportage with fierce advocacy that will make committed carnivores squeal."—Kirkus Reviews

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780316069885
  • Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
  • Publication date: 9/1/2010
  • Pages: 341
  • Sales rank: 1,479
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.10 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Jonathan Safran Safran Foer

Jonathan Safran Foer is one of the most acclaimed young writers of his generation, a "certified wunderkind" (Time) whose work has appeared in The Paris Review, The New York Times, and The New Yorker. He has earned a National Jewish Book Award, a Guardian First Book Award, and remarkable praise for his first two novels, Everything Is Illuminated (adapted for film in 2005) and Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close. EATING ANIMALS is his first work of nonfiction.

Biography

Recent literary history is rife with auspicious debuts, and Jonathan Safran Foer's arrival was one of 2002's brightest and most media-friendly. After all, the backstory was publicist-ready: Everything Is Illuminated began as a thesis at Princeton under advisers Joyce Carol Oates and Jeffrey Eugenides, and Houghton Mifflin reportedly paid somewhere around half a million dollars for the rights.

Foer achieved a fresh, creative approach to the English language by viewing it through the eyes of his foreign narrator, a young Ukranian man named Alex who works in a family tour operating business targeted toward American Jews seeking their family roots. Alex's comical, dictionary-aided writing consists of not-quite-right sentences such as "He is always promenading into things. It was only four days previous that he made his eye blue from a mismanagement with a brick wall." Alex's client, an American Jew named Jonathan Safran Foer, wants to find a woman who hid his grandfather from the Nazis. The two set out -- with an old picture, and the name Augustine -- to find the woman, bringing Alex's grandfather and an odiferous seeing-eye dog.

The story unfolds both through Alex's eyes and in a later correspondence with Jonathan, who reveals chapters of a fictionalized version of Augustine's story. Despite the novel's decidedly earnest and serious themes, what's most striking about it is its strange, resonant humor. Publishers Weekly saw "demented genius" in it; and Francine Prose, who also used the adjective "demented" for Foer's writing, noted in the New York Times Book Review, "The problem [with the book] is, you keep laughing out loud, losing your place, starting again, then stopping because you're tempted to call your friends and read them long sections of Jonathan Safran Foer's assured, hilarious prose."

Since Foer admitted to doing little research (although he did take a trip similar to the fictional Foer's, inspiring the book), and the historical fiction sections earned some critical gripes for being uneven (Salon called them "dime-store García Márquez"), the chief strength of Everything Is Illuminated lies in a scope and wit that are stunning from an author who was still finishing up college at the time he began it. The paperback rights for Everything Is Illuminated later went for reportedly close to $1 million.

Foer has had an undergrad's dream experience when it comes to consorting with eminent forbears: Russell Banks -- a professor in Foer's senior year -- came to his aid when he assembled A Convergence of Birds: Original Fiction and Poetry Inspired by the Work of Joseph Cornell, which was published in 2001.

If Foer follows in the footsteps of fellow critical debut darlings Eugenides and Donna Tartt, it will be another ten years before we see a second novel. Fans will hope that instead he follows Oates's more prolific example.

Good To Know

According to a Princeton publication, Foer has been a "math tutor, archivist, ghost writer, farm sitter, advertising consultant and receptionist."

One of the many projects on Foer's "Project Museum" Web site is the Empty Page Project, a collection of blank paper from various authors -- the paper they normally use to write (anything) on. Nothing is on display yet, but according to a Guardian article, Foer has acquired pages from Paul Auster, Susan Sontag and Isaac Bashevis Singer.

Both of Foer's brothers are editorial types: Franklin is an editor at the New Republic, and Joshua is a recent Yale grad and a contributor to Slate.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Jonathan Safran Foer
    2. Hometown:
      New York, New York
    1. Date of Birth:
      February 21, 1977
    2. Place of Birth:
      Washington, D.C.
    1. Education:
      B.A. in Philosophy, Princeton University, 1999

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 218 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(117)

4 Star

(65)

3 Star

(18)

2 Star

(10)

1 Star

(8)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 219 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 16, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I'm halfway through this book and...

    I already know I won't ever eat a chicken again. Now, I'm working on getting eggs out of my diet as well. Even if you think you've read and heard it all about how our factory farms operate, read this book anyway. You will learn something new. I've been an on again, off again vegetarian, (like the author) and after I'm finished with this book, it will be very hard to be even a casual meat eater. It may just turn me vegan! I also love the fact that he takes both sides of the argument by including letters from the people that work at factory farms, but really, I don't believe feeding the world has to destroy it. Americans eat too much meat, plain and simple. That's why we have a lot more disease and obesity in this country than anywhere else in the world. The Western diet is the most unhealthy, disease promoting diet on the planet, and yet people are so unwilling to change. Find out the facts and do what feels right to you. I think it's funny to live in a country where if you mention you don't eat meat, people get angry with you and wonder what your problem is. Now I know those people just feel guilty or feel like I'm quietly criticizing them.

    We have to be conscious eaters or we will be unhealthy. Mr. Foer has done loads of research and all we have to do is read this book. Highly recommend this book!

    23 out of 24 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 21, 2009

    This book goes to the heart of the debate about how we treat ourselves , animals and the earth at large.Eating Animals is characteristic of Foer's ability to both show empathy and clarity in what could be a diatribe.

    I highly recommend this book for anyone. Even those who already think they are on the writers side will be moved. Hopefully this book will wake up others to the dire problem we are living in.

    9 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 5, 2011

    Informative, but told like a Story.

    I can't tell you how surprised i was that in the beginning Foer dedicates a whole chapter to the story of his childhood and his grandmother. I'm nearly done with the book, and i actually finding myself wishing it would be longer. What i like about it is that he mingles with the gritty facts a witty humor and pairs them against touching stories and truthful insights. He shows the story from all sides. He looks at the subject of eating animals as a verb (the action of our eating them) and as a adj+noun pair (the animals that we eat). And he asks the vital questions in non-confrontational ways. We can eat meat...but does that mean we should? He guides you through his mindset of how he became a vegetarian with facts. Its almost like you're sitting there with him as he tells the story. Uncovering the methods of factory farming is something most of us would rather not do. I have been a vegetarian for a little over 4 months now, and i'm more convinced than ever. Farming used to be an honorable thing. My grandparents did it in their backyards. But just the combination of the words "factory" and "farming" should be enough to show how the scales have been tipped. We are eating mutants, plain and simple. Turkeys can't even reproduce naturally. This book educates you without making you hate the people responsible. Foer interviews many, including ranchers and slaughterhouse managers. He shows the story from their side. He presents us with the question of, "Is it possible to be a conscious omnivore?" (To eat meat that was not factory farmed.) He goes on to say it IS possible, but extremely difficult. All in all, it is a novel much more complex than you would assume. Vegetarian or staunch carnivore, it should be read.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2009

    Phenomenal.

    This book was very educational in more ways than one. Not only giving the view point on an animal's life but the view point on the farmer's, too. The research was great and the facts are original, probably the best I've seen in a book. Which is why I would recommend this book to anyone, even if you're not for animal rights just because it is that interesting.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2011

    Pretty Informative

    Most of us have read, seen, or heard people talk about Food, Inc. This book is on the same wavelength. The author investigates farming factories to learn how animals are raised, processed, and packaged. What he uncovers is quite disturbing, sad, and disgusting, hence my current vegetarian status. Everyone should learn about American factory farms, what's happening to these animals, and what our bodies have been allegedly absorbing, all starting in the late 80's, early 90's and increasingly worsening into the present day. The downside to this book is his memoir style of writing that looks into the food culture of his past and his values for his nutrition and his family's. I couldn't help but ask myself on many occasions, who cares? But, I guess it's good to see his motivation and passion. The bottom line is that the book presents practically inarguable facts that should be life changing, if you're willing to go there.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 2, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    fabulous read

    Eye opening! I have not eaten meat since I read this book a few months ago. Not for the weak stomach. Some details are horrifying.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Still don't know where your meat is coming from?

    Foer deftly draws the picture of factory farms in 21st century America, and if you've somehow managed to miss all the newspaper articles, news reports, tv shows, websites, etc., about this institutionalized cruelty, do yourself a favor and buy this book. Every American has a right to know about where our food comes from and how that "food" is treated during its life. What I particularly enjoyed about this book is that Foer includes interviews of and essays written by people in the industry; by hog farmers, by slaughterhouse workers, by people raising organic meat - and they make good arguments, too (though I don't mean to mislead you - it's always clear what Foer's opinion is about the matter at hand).

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 4, 2010

    Know your food!

    Thank you, Jonathan Safran Foer! My eyes are wide open! I have heard horror stories about factory farms for years, and have always tried to purchase free range family farm products but this book is a real wakeup call for me and hopefully many others. I began reading "Eating Animals" with the intention of learning more about where our food comes from and hopefully learn some ways to use my dollar (as a consumer) to combat the horrific treatment of animals raised for food. What first struck a chord with me is the notion that we are cognizant beings with a choice as to what we eat. Animal flesh is not necessary for our survival but rather a cultural, social, and automatic response for many of us. It goes hand in hand with feelings of acceptance, togetherness, and taste. I had no idea that by the end of this read I would be changing my diet because of it. The information presented is stunningly graphic, uncensored, and real. But, ultimately it is really important and will change the way you think of food. Through education and awareness, we arm ourselves with the tools to make a switch in the way the farming industry in America (and the rest of the world) operates.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 3, 2010

    WHAT THE CORPORATE INDUSTRY DOES JUST TO PROVIDE US MEAT TO EAT IS HORRIFIC!

    I'm an animal lover and it was very hard for me to read this book but it has changed my life. I would recommend this book for everyone to read just so they know how unreputable and corrupt the meat industry is.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 17, 2013

    I have been vegetarian off and on throughout the years, just lik

    I have been vegetarian off and on throughout the years, just like the author, but it will be hard to ever enjoy meat again. Before I picked up this book I had already set my mind to become vegetarian again, and now my goal now is to become vegan. but this book reveals the horrid disgusting truth about factory farming and makes you really think about the decisions you make with the food you eat. It is a must read.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 30, 2012

    A driving force behind your next meal choice... I’ve read

    A driving force behind your next meal choice...
    I’ve read quite a few books on the animal welfare movement, and Eating Animals by Jonathan Safran Foer is one of my favorites. This book, in summary, analyzes how animal products in the United States are produced and sold to consumers. The author presents the reader with facts about the meat-packing industry, and presents possible solutions to the horrendous conditions exposed in his studies. Unlike many books that address the idea of vegetarianism and veganism, Eating Animals does not brainwash the reader into giving up meat and dairy products. This book is the perfect balance between offering an argument and presenting the facts to go along with it. Safran Foer does not make the reader feel guilty for eating meat, but rather gives them the inspiration, and assistance, to make a change. The amount of evidence that Foer gave to defend his arguments absolutely blew me away. There was no shortage of graphic worker testimonials (those were the driving force behind why I gave up meat), references to government law, and shocking statistics from various censuses. It is quite obvious that the author spent a great amount of time researching and writing this novel. I highly recommend this book to anybody who has a passion for animals and a desire to do their part on the issue of animal rights and animal welfare. It is a must-read for vegetarians and vegans alike, but beware, many situations exposed in this book are very graphic and require a tough stomach. However, the author’s willingness to expose these harsh truths of the food industry is one of the main reasons to read this book. All omnivores definitely should educate themselves about where their meat and dairy products are coming from, so they can make informed decisions that affect the well-being of themselves, their family, and planet earth. This book really opened my eyes- I highly recommend it to anybody who is willing to read it!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 17, 2010

    Great Read!

    The very beginning of this novel had me intrigued. I had never really thought about why I ate any sort of animal. It was more or less something taught to me from my parents sort of like putting on a coat before you go out in a snow storm. I thoroughly enjoyed the humor and honest revelations Foer sets out to conquer in this book. I was also surprised at what really goes on behind the scenes in the food industry.

    I found this to be an intriguing read. It really makes you think. I've also walked away with a greater knowledge from both sides of the spectrum.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 22, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Great book but...

    We need to keep in mind one thing. As with any other industry/business, there are good and bad ones. I say that because my own family owned a poultry farm, working for a much larger company (so they would provide the birds/food and come back to pick them up 42-45 days later).

    Compared to the book, it is indeed very accurate BUT at least on our own place, with 7,000 birds, things were definitely not as described (meaning horrendous) as in the book. It was actually pretty good and I would let anyone in to see how the birds were raised/treated. What happend later at the slaughter house, I have no idea and cannot comment on that.

    The main point is simple: if human beings want to eat for no money at all, on the really cheap side, there is no other way to do without the big farming operations. It gets down to you, to decide if you want to pay a premium (like I do) to get your food from small, local producers that raise their animals (poultry, pork, beef) the way it was done 60, 80 years ago.

    What I liked the most is the author, even though he is a vegetarian, does NOT try to brainwash you to become one; all he wants is to show you the facts of farming in America. He leaves it up to you to decide what to do once you have all the information.

    It is a great reading and will definitely make you think twice when shopping at your big chain grocery store.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2010

    The same basis as all other vegetarians

    Over the years, as an avowed omnivore, I have heard many different variations of these arguments. This book simply re-iterated them, and had no other premises. While the writing and research were good, I don't think that this book, or any others like them, will ever force me to change my opinions to becoming a leaf-eater. I do enjoy veggies, but meat is an essential part of the human diet. And personally, if it's cheaper, I don't care where it came from.

    2 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2010

    Should be required reading for all Americans!

    This book was very well written and a big eye opener. I haven't eaten red meat in 12 years and thought I was only eating the "lesser of two evils". This book really opened my eyes to the horrific treatment of all animals, poultry and fish and how we "forget" what we're eating so we don't feel bad about it. I am actively moving to complete vegetarianism after reading this book.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2013

    Great

    This book opened my eyes and gave me reasons to be vegan.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 25, 2013

    This book does not at all fit the description - almost the entir

    This book does not at all fit the description - almost the entire books discusses factory farming and slaughter practices. It only touches briefly on his life and childhood and his relationship with food. I would not recommend this if you ever want to eat meat again. I will likely not eat chicken or turkey again after this and while that is a personal choice and probably a good one, I wish I had come to the choice on my own and not out of pure disgust after reading this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2012

    A must read for anyone who cares about anything, from your health and your family's health, to the world and its enviroment!

    As i progressed through the book i became increasingly amazed at how rounded the author's evidence is. Not only did his testimonials offer manny dufferent point of views on the subject of the meat industry, but he provided information on so many things related to the meat industry that most people rarely consider. This take on the health risks and enviromental impacts of what we eat is truely thought proviking. I've reccomended ths book to lots of friends and coworkers and especially my family, it really makes you take an informed lifestyle and moral decision.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2012

    Powerful

    Heartfelt yet factually supported argument against the status quo

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 5, 2012

    Good read

    I enjoyed the read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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