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Frenchman's Creek

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Overview

"Highly personalized adventure, ultra-romantic mood, and skillful storytelling." —New York Times

DAPHNE DU MAURIER'S LOST CLASSIC; AN ELECTRIFYING TALE OF LOVE AND SCANDAL ON THE HIGH SEAS.

Jaded by the numbing politeness of Restoration London, Lady Dona St. Columb revolts against high society. She rides into the countryside, guided only by her restlessness and her longing to escape.

But when chance leads her ...

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Frenchman's Creek

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Overview

"Highly personalized adventure, ultra-romantic mood, and skillful storytelling." —New York Times

DAPHNE DU MAURIER'S LOST CLASSIC; AN ELECTRIFYING TALE OF LOVE AND SCANDAL ON THE HIGH SEAS.

Jaded by the numbing politeness of Restoration London, Lady Dona St. Columb revolts against high society. She rides into the countryside, guided only by her restlessness and her longing to escape.

But when chance leads her to meet a French pirate, hidden within Cornwall's shadowy forests, Dona discovers that her passions and thirst for adventure have never been more aroused. Together, they embark upon a quest rife with danger and glory, one which bestows upon Dona the ultimate choice: sacrifice her lover to certain death or risk her own life to save him.

Frenchman's Creek is the breathtaking story of a woman searching for love and adventure who embraces the dangerous life of a fugitive on the seas.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Anyone who has ever felt the need to escape from the cage of daily life will identify with and love this book. " - Book Thoughts By Lisa

"The denouement will keep one thinking for a long time after the book has been finished, and would be a great discussion topic for book groups." - Ex Libris

"The story is intriguing and the book is an absolute pleasure to read. I had a lovely time with this, and I think you would too." - Medieval Bookworm

"I really liked Frenchman's Creek, it reminded me why classics are classics, endured for many generations and will be read by countless others." - Reading Extravaganza

"[A]n entertaining, very well written story..." - A Lovely Shore Breeze

"Be careful when you set out to read this novel. Daphne du Maurier will capture your imagination with more stealth, speed, and skill than any of her pirates ever could. " - The Literate Housewife

"This is a entertaining read and one I would recommend if you enjoy a classic historical romance." - Peeking Between the Pages

"Wow, I can certainly tell why Sourcebooks wants to bring back stories like these!... Frenchman's Creek is a most satisfying tale. " - Book Loons

"This is excellent and intense storytelling, many thanks to Sourcebooks for re-releasing the novels of this classic author. " - The Tome Traveller's Weblog

" I was so caught up in the story that I did not want to put it down." - Books and Needlepoint"I heartily recommend Frenchman's Creek to anyone who appreciates romance, mystery or the gothic novel... I praise Sourcebooks for bringing her work to a new generation of readers." - Reader for Life

"I am just sorry that it has taken me this long to read something by this fantastic author. This will not be the last book I read by her though, that's a guarantee!" - The Review From Here

" It's romantic and scandalous and adventurous. The most pleasant journey I've ever taken with a pirate. " - The Book Nest

"[I]t was definitely enjoyable. She has quite a way with words, the language she used was simply beautiful. " - Devourer of Books

"Fans of Rafael Sabatini and other romantic period adventures will be quite pleased with this book." - Books are My Only Friends

"This is a fabulous read for fans of romance or fans of gothic historical fiction and it is a tribute to the folks at Sourcebooks for choosing such a timeless classic to reprint today." - A Reader's Respite

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781402217104
  • Publisher: Sourcebooks, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 3/1/2009
  • Pages: 284
  • Sales rank: 220,463
  • Product dimensions: 5.20 (w) x 7.90 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Daphne du Maurier was born in London in 1907, the second daughter of a famous stage actor and actress. Her first novel was published in 1931, but it was her 1938 novel Rebecca which made her one of the most successful writers of her time. Alfred Hitchcock's adaptation of the book won the Best Picture Oscar in 1940, and he used her material again for his classic The Birds. In 1969, Du Maurier was created a Dame of the British Empire.

At the age of 81, Du Maurier died at home in her beloved Cornwall, the region that had been the setting for many of her books.

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Read an Excerpt

One

W hen the east wind blows up Helford river the shining waters become troubled and disturbed and the little waves beat angrily upon the sandy shores. The short seas break above the bar at ebb-tide, and the waders fly inland to the mud-flats, their wings skimming the surface, and calling to one another as they go. Only the gulls remain, wheeling and crying above the foam, diving now and again in search of food, their grey feathers glistening with the salt spray.

The long rollers of the Channel, travelling from beyond Lizard point, follow hard upon the steep seas at the river mouth, and mingling with the surge and wash of deep sea water comes the brown tide, swollen with the last rains and brackish from the mud, bearing upon its face dead twigs and straws, and strange forgotten things, leaves too early fallen, young birds, and the buds of flowers.

The open roadstead is deserted, for an east wind makes uneasy anchorage, and but for the few houses scattered here and there above Helford passage, and the group of bungalows about Port Navas, the river would be the same as it was in a century now forgotten, in a time that has left few memories.

In those days the hills and the valleys were alone in splendour, there were no buildings to desecrate the rough fields and cliffs, no chimney pots to peer out of the tall woods. There were a few cottages in Helford hamlet, but they made no impression upon the river life itself, which belonged to the birds — curlew and redshank, guillemot and puffin. No yachts rode to the tide then, as they do to-day, and that stretch of placid water where the river divides to Constantine and Gweek was calm and undisturbed.

The river was little known, save to a few mariners who had found shelter there when the south-west gales drove them inshore from their course up-channel, and they found the place lonely and austere, a little frightening because of the silence, and when the wind was fair again were glad to weigh anchor and set sail. Helford hamlet was no inducement to a sailor ashore, the few cottage folk dull-witted and uncommunicative, and the fellow who has been away from warmth and women over-long has little desire to wander in the woods or dabble with the waders in the mud at ebb-tide. So the winding river remained unvisited, the woods and the hills untrodden, and all the drowsy beauty of midsummer that gives Helford river a strange enchantment was never seen and never known.

To-day there are many voices to blunder in upon the silence. The pleasure steamers come and go, leaving a churning wake, and yachtsmen visit one another, and even the day-tripper, his dull eye surfeited with undigested beauty, ploughs in and out amongst the shallows, a prawning net in hand. Sometimes, in a little puffing car, he jerks his way along the uneven, muddy track that leads sharply to the right out of Helford village, and takes his tea with his fellow-trippers in the stone kitchen of the old farm building that once was Navron House. There is something of grandeur about it even now. Part of the original quadrangle still stands, enclosing the farm-yard of to-day, and the two pillars that once formed the entrance to the house, now over-grown with ivy and encrusted with lichen, serve as props to the modern barn with its corrugated roof.

The farm kitchen, where the tripper takes his tea, was part of Navron dining-hall, and the little half-stair, now terminating in a bricked-up wall, was the stair leading to the gallery. The rest of the house must have crumbled away, or been demolished, for the square farm-building, though handsome enough, bears little likeness to the Navron of the old prints, shaped like the letter E, and of the formal garden and the park there is no trace to-day.

The tripper eats his split and drinks his tea, smiling upon the landscape, knowing nothing of the woman who stood there once, long ago, in another summer, who caught the gleam of the river amidst the trees, as he does, and who lifted her head to the sky and felt the sun.

He hears the homely farm-yard noises, the clanking of pails, the lowing of cattle, the rough voices of the farmer and his son as they call to each other across the yard, but his ears are deaf to the echoes of that other time, when someone whistled softly from the dark belt of trees, his hands cupped to his mouth, and was swiftly answered by the thin, stooping figure crouching beneath the walls of the silent house, while above them the casement opened, and Dona watched and listened, her hands playing a little nameless melody upon the sill, her ringlets falling forward over her face.

The river flows on, the trees rustle in the summer wind, and down on the mud flats the oyster-catchers stand at ebb-tide scanning the shallows for food, and the curlews cry, but the men and women of that other time are forgotten, their headstones encrusted with lichen and moss, their names indecipherable.

To-day the cattle stamp and churn the earth over the vanished porch of Navron House, where once a man stood as the clock struck midnight, his face smiling in the dim candlelight, his drawn sword in his hand.

In spring the farmer's children gather primroses and snowdrops in the banks above the creek, their muddy boots snapping the dead twigs and the fallen leaves of a spent summer, and the creek itself, swollen with the rains of a long winter, looks desolate and grey.

The trees still crowd thick and darkly to the water's edge, and the moss is succulent and green upon the little quay where Dona built her fire and looked across the flames and laughed at her lover, but to-day no ship lies at anchor in the pool, with rakish masts pointing to the skies, there is no rattle of chain through the hawse hole, no rich tobacco smell upon the air, no echo of voices coming across the water in a lilting foreign tongue.

The solitary yachtsman who leaves his yacht in the open roadstead of Helford, and goes exploring up river in his dinghy on a night in midsummer, when the night-jars call, hesitates when he comes upon the mouth of the creek, for there is something of mystery about it even now, something of enchantment. Being a stranger, the yachtsman looks back over his shoulder to the safe yacht in the roadstead, and to the broad waters of the river, and he pauses, resting on his paddles, aware suddenly of the deep silence of the creek, of its narrow twisting channel, and he feels — for no reason known to him — that he is an interloper, a trespasser in time. He ventures a little way along the left bank of the creek, the sound of the blades upon the water seeming over-loud and echoing oddly amongst the trees on the farther bank, and as he creeps forward the creek narrows, the trees crowd yet more thickly to the water's edge, and he feels a spell upon him, fascinating, strange, a thing of queer excitement not fully understood.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 10 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 4, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Loved it!

    I was surprised by how much I enjoyed this book. It is one I will read again and again!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 4, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    pleasantly surprised!

    When I first started reading the book, I was a little wary of the main character, Dona. But that quickly faded, and I began to love her and the mysterious French pirate she falls in love with. And her servant William is my favorite character of all! Such excellent writing. This book is funny, romantic, and very suspenseful. I could read this book over and over.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 20, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    England, Secret Coves, and Pirates! oh my!

    From the author of Rebeca and the short story The Birds, du Maurier's out-of-print/in-print book is a great gem for any personal library.
    Written in 1942 but set in Restoration London (1660), easily slides into the historical fiction genre, romance, and fiction all at once.
    Lady Dona St. Columb is just a few months shy of 30, as she mentions throughout the story, and yet it is the backdrop of her discontent as she starts to question her existence and high jinks among London's high society. After a particular stunt that drives her to shame, she flees London with her two children to her husband's estate in Cornwall and seeks to find herself in the countryside's quietness and solitude. Lady St. Columb soon discovers the underbelly of the veneer of her surroundings and partakes of life and death adventures.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2014

    Frenchman's Creek by Daphne de Maurier

    A wonderful book. I first read the book and saw the movie (in a theatre) over 50 years ago; I was delighted that you now offer it as a NOOK e-Book.

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  • Posted December 8, 2013

    one of my all-time favorites from a favorite author--Dona's adve

    one of my all-time favorites from a favorite author--Dona's adventures "finding herself" especially the scene about the birth of a baby are great. I too loved William!

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    Posted April 23, 2009

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    Posted April 17, 2009

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    Posted March 30, 2010

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    Posted September 27, 2010

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