Goliath (Leviathan Series #3)

( 228 )

Overview

The riveting conclusion to Scott Westerfeld’s New York Times bestselling trilogy that’s “sure to become a classic” (School Library Journal).

Alek and Deryn are on the last leg of their round-the-world quest to end World War I, reclaim Alek’s throne as prince of Austria, and finally fall in love. The first two objectives are complicated by the fact that their ship, the Leviathan, continues to detour farther away from the heart of the war (and crown). And the love thing would be a...

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Overview

The riveting conclusion to Scott Westerfeld’s New York Times bestselling trilogy that’s “sure to become a classic” (School Library Journal).

Alek and Deryn are on the last leg of their round-the-world quest to end World War I, reclaim Alek’s throne as prince of Austria, and finally fall in love. The first two objectives are complicated by the fact that their ship, the Leviathan, continues to detour farther away from the heart of the war (and crown). And the love thing would be a lot easier if Alek knew Deryn was a girl. (She has to pose as a boy in order to serve in the British Air Service.) And if they weren’t technically enemies.

The tension thickens as the Leviathan steams toward New York City with a homicidal lunatic on board: Secrets suddenly unravel, characters reappear, and nothing is as it seems in this thunderous conclusion to Scott Westerfeld’s brilliant trilogy.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - BriAnne Baxley MLIS
As the Great War continues on, the Darwinists' ship Leviathan and its crew find themselves headed on another adventure. As the ship crew follows orders to Siberia, Alex, a Clanker prince, and Dreyn, a young girl concealing her true identity, find themselves in the mist of secrets once again. When a strange guest joins the crew on the Leviathan the two friends find themselves taking on heroic feats to protect the things that are important in their lives while they search for the truth. A truth to Alek is the key to finding an end to the Great War; the Great War that his own family began. With its steampunk nature and historical setting, this third book which ends the "Leviathan" trilogy brings those who have joined in the adventure from the very beginning side by side with familiar characters, nonstop action, and new secrets allowing it become another page turner. Reviewer: BriAnne Baxley, MLIS
School Library Journal
Gr 7 Up—The title of this final volume in the trilogy refers to a device created by the mad inventor Nikola Tesla, which he claims can lay waste to entire cities. The story picks up with Alek and Deryn/Dylan traveling in the living hydrogen dirigible known as the Leviathan to Russia under orders to pick up a cargo from the czar, along with Tesla as a passenger. While there are questions about the mysterious cargo and the inventor's wild claims, the real thread of plot here is that Alek finally discovers that Deryn is a girl and has to deal with his conflicted feelings toward her. Deryn, on the other hand, is in love with him, but doesn't believe her love can be returned as she is a commoner. Along with Tesla, a host of other historical figures appear in the plot, including William Randolph Hearst and Mexican revolutionary Pancho Villa. The Leviathan makes an epic journey from Russia to California, and then to New York, via Mexico, where in a fateful last stand, Alex has to make a decision as Tesla prepares to use the Goliath device to destroy Berlin while the city is under attack by German undersea Walkers. At story's end, Westerfeld's alternate steampunk version of World War I is not over, but Alex and Deryn's life together appears to be just beginning. Goliath delivers some action, thrills, and a satisfying love story, despite some muddled plotting in the middle section. Nonetheless, it is a must-read for fans of the series and of the steampunk genre.—Tim Wadham, St. Louis County Library, MO
Kirkus Reviews

The Leviathan trilogy-ender delivers on the promise of the series: thrilling airship battles, world travel, ginormous Tesla coils and a few daring smooches.

A revolution in Istanbul behind them, Alek and Deryn travel wherever the living airship Leviathan is ordered by the British Empire. Deryn knows Alek's secret—that he is heir to the Austro-Hungarian Empire—but Alek doesn't know that Deryn is truly a girl. They don't have much time to spare for their own personal soap opera as they freewheel around war-torn continents, from Siberia to Japan to the United States to Mexico. Alek and Deryn escape ravenous fighting bears tall as houses, ride atop a gale-tossed airship and star in motion pictures. The whole is peppered with sagacious statements from the tragically underused Perspicacious Lorises, faux-simple creatures always ready to spout off a wise word or three. This entry is relatively light on the steam-powered clankers and genetically engineered beasties that drove the first two volumes of the trilogy, replacing them with repeated airborne drama. Still, any lost steampunky science is compensated for by nonstop action; it's hard to mind theatrical revelations when they occur in a made-for-CGI storm. Besides, in the midst of all that action Alek learns the art of navigation and how to measure the weight of water; how cool is that?

Madcap adventure ends much too quickly. (Steampunk. 12-15)

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781416971788
  • Publisher: Simon Pulse
  • Publication date: 8/21/2012
  • Series: Leviathan Series , #3
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 543
  • Sales rank: 61,354
  • Age range: 12 years
  • Product dimensions: 5.66 (w) x 8.04 (h) x 1.48 (d)

Meet the Author

Scott Westerfeld

Scott Westerfeld’s first book in the Leviathan trilogy was the winner of the 2010 Locus Award for Best Young Adult Fiction. His other novels include the New York Times bestselling Uglies series, The Last Days, Peeps, So Yesterday, and the Midnighters trilogy. Visit him at ScottWesterfeld.com.

Keith Thompson’s work has appeared in books, magazines, TV,video games, and films. Se his works at KeithThompson Art.com.

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Read an Excerpt

“Siberia,” Alek said. The word slipped cold and hard from his tongue, as forbidding as the landscape passing below.

“We won’t be over Siberia till tomorrow.” Dylan sat at the table, still attacking his breakfast. “And it’ll take almost a week to cross it. Russia is barking big.”

“And cold,” Newkirk added. He stood next to Alek at the window of the middies’ mess, both hands wrapped around a cup of tea.

“Cold,” repeated Bovril. The creature clutched Alek’s shoulder a little tighter, and a shiver went through its body.

In early October no snow lay on the ground below. But the sky was an icy, cloudless blue. The window had a lace of frost around its edges, left over from a frigid night.

Another week of flying across this wasteland, Alek thought. Farther from Europe and the war, and from his destiny. The Leviathan was still headed east, probably toward the empire of Japan, though no one would confirm their destination. Even though he’d helped the British cause back in Istanbul, the airship’s officers still saw Alek and his men as little better than prisoners. He was a Clanker prince and they were Darwinists, and the Great War between the two technologies was spreading faster every day.

“It’ll get much colder as we angle north,” Dylan said around a mouthful of his breakfast. “You should both finish your potatoes. They’ll keep you warm.”

Alek turned. “But we’re already north of Tokyo. Why go out of our way?”

“We’re dead on course,” Dylan said. “Mr. Rigby made us plot a great circle route last week, and it took us all the way up to Omsk.”

“A great circle route?”

“It’s a navigator’s trick,” Newkirk explained. He breathed on the window glass before him, then drew an upside-down smile with one fingertip. “The earth is round, but paper is flat, right? So a straight course looks curved when you draw it on a map. You always wind up going farther north than you’d think.”

“Except below the equator,” Dylan added. “Then it’s the other way round.”

Bovril chuckled, as if great circle routes were quite amusing. But Alek hadn’t followed a word of it—not that he’d expected to.

It was maddening. Two weeks ago he’d helped lead a revolution against the Ottoman sultan, ruler of an ancient empire. The rebels had welcomed Alek’s counsel, his piloting skills, and his gold. And together they’d won.

But here aboard the Leviathan he was deadweight—a waste of hydrogen, as the crew called anything useless. He might spend his days beside Dylan and Newkirk, but he was no midshipman. He couldn’t take a sextant reading, tie a decent knot, or estimate the ship’s altitude.

Worst of all, Alek was no longer needed in the engine pods. In the month he’d been plotting revolution in Istanbul, the Darwinist engineers had learned a lot about Clanker mechaniks. Hoffman and Klopp were no longer called up to help with the engines, so there was hardly any need for a translator.

Since the first time he’d come aboard, Alek had dreamed of somehow serving on the Leviathan. But everything he could offer—walker piloting, fencing, speaking six languages, and being a grandnephew of an emperor—seemed to be worthless on an airship. He was no doubt more valuable as a young prince who had famously switched sides than as an airman.

It was as if everyone were trying to make him a waste of hydrogen.

Then Alek remembered a saying of his father’s: The only way to remedy ignorance is to admit it.

He took a slow breath. “I’m aware that the earth is round, Mr. Newkirk. But I still don’t understand this ‘great circle route’ business.”

“It’s dead easy to see if you’ve got a globe in front of you,” Dylan said, pushing away his plate. “There’s one in the navigation room. We’ll sneak in sometime when the officers aren’t there.”

“That would be most agreeable.” Alek turned back to the window and clasped his hands behind his back.

“It’s nothing to be ashamed of, Prince Aleksandar,” Newkirk said. “Still takes me ages to plot a proper course. Not like Mr. Sharp here, knowing all about sextants before he even joined the Service.”

“Not all of us are lucky enough to have an airman for a father,” Alek said.

“Father?” Newkirk turned from the window, frowning. “Wasn’t that your uncle, Mr. Sharp?”

Bovril made a soft noise, sinking its tiny claws into Alek’s shoulder. Dylan said nothing, though. He seldom spoke of his father, who had burned to death in front of the boy’s eyes. The accident still haunted Dylan, and fire was the only thing that frightened him.

Alek cursed himself as a Dummkopf, wondering why he’d mentioned the man. Was he angry at Dylan for always being so good at everything?

He was about to apologize when Bovril shifted again, leaning forward to stare out the window.

“Beastie,” the perspicacious loris said.

A black fleck had glided into view, wheeling across the empty blue sky. It was a huge bird, much bigger than the falcons that had circled the airship in the mountains a few days before. It had the size and claws of a predator, but its shape was unlike any Alek had seen before.

It was headed straight for the ship.

“Does that bird look odd to you, Mr. Newkirk?”

Newkirk turned back to the window and raised his field glasses, which were still around his neck from the morning watch.

“Aye,” he said a moment later. “I think it’s an imperial eagle!”

There was a hasty scrape of chair legs from behind them. Dylan appeared at the window, shielding his eyes with both hands.

“Blisters, you’re right—two heads! But imperials only carry messages from the czar himself. . . .”

Alek glanced at Dylan, wondering if he’d heard right. Two heads?

The eagle soared closer, flashing past the window in a blur of black feathers, a glint of gold from its harness catching the morning sun. Bovril broke into maniacal laughter at its passage.

“It’s headed for the bridge, right?” Alek asked.

“Aye.” Newkirk lowered his field glasses. “Important messages go straight to the captain.”

A bit of hope pried its way into Alek’s dark mood. The Russians were allies of the British, fellow Darwinists who fabricated mammothines and giant fighting bears. What if the czar needed help against the Clanker armies and this was a summons to turn the ship around? Even fighting on the icy Russian front would be better than wasting time in this wilderness.

“I need to know what that message says.”

Newkirk snorted. “Why don’t you go and ask the captain, then?”

“Aye,” Dylan said. “And while you’re at it, ask him to give me a warmer cabin.”

“What can it hurt?” Alek said. “He hasn’t thrown me into the brig yet.”

When Alek had returned to the Leviathan two weeks ago, he’d half expected to be put in chains for escaping from the ship. But the ship’s officers had treated him with respect.

Perhaps it wasn’t so bad, everyone finally knowing he was the son of the late Archduke Ferdinand, and not just some Austrian noble trying to escape the war.

“What’s a good excuse to pay the bridge a visit?” he asked.

“No need for excuses,” Newkirk said. “That bird’s flown all the way from Saint Petersburg. They’ll call us to come and fetch it for a rest and a feeding.”

“And you’ve never seen the rookery, your princeliness,” Dylan added. “Might as well tag along.”

“Thank you, Mr. Sharp,” Alek said, smiling. “I would like that.”

Dylan returned to the table and his precious potatoes, perhaps grateful that the talk of his father had been interrupted. Alek decided he would apologize before the day was out.

Ten minutes later a message lizard popped its head from a tube on the ceiling in the middies’ mess. It said in the master coxswain’s voice, “Mr. Sharp, please come to the bridge. Mr. Newkirk, report to the cargo deck.”

The three of them scrambled for the door.

“Cargo deck?” Newkirk said. “What in blazes is that about?”

“Maybe they want you to inventory the stocks again,” Dylan said. “This trip might have just got longer.”

Alek frowned. Would “longer” mean turning back toward Europe, or heading still farther away?

As the three made their way toward the bridge, he sensed the ship stirring around them. No alert had sounded, but the crew was bustling. When Newkirk peeled off to descend the central stairway, a squad of riggers in flight suits went storming past, also headed down.

“Where in blazes are they going?” Alek asked. Riggers always worked topside, in the ropes that held the ship’s huge hydrogen membrane.

“A dead good question,” Dylan said. “The czar’s message seems to have turned us upside down.”

The bridge had a guard posted at the door, and a dozen message lizards clung to the ceiling, waiting for orders to be dispatched. There was a sharp edge to the usual thrum of men and creatures and machines. Bovril shifted on Alek’s shoulder, and he felt the engines change pitch through the soles of his boots—the ship was coming to full-ahead.

Up at the ship’s master wheel, the officers were huddled around the captain, who held an ornate scroll. Dr. Barlow was among the group, her own loris on her shoulder, her pet thylacine, Tazza, sitting at her side.

A squawk came from Alek’s right, and he turned to find himself face-to-face with the most astonishing creature. . . .

The imperial eagle was too large to fit into the bridge’s messenger cage, and it perched instead on the signals table. It shifted from one taloned claw to the other, glossy black wings fluttering.

And what Dylan had said was true. The creature had two heads, and two necks, of course, coiled around each other like a pair of black feathered snakes. As Alek watched in horror, one head snapped at the other, a bright red tongue slithering from its mouth.

“God’s wounds,” he breathed.

“Like we told you,” Dylan said. “It’s an imperial eagle.”

“It’s an abomination, you mean.” Sometimes the Darwinists’ creatures seemed to have been fabricated not for their usefulness, but simply to be horrific.

Dylan shrugged. “It’s just a two-headed bird, like on the czar’s crest.”

“Yes, of course,” Alek sputtered. “But that’s meant to be symbolic.”

“Aye, this beastie’s symbolic. It’s just breathing as well.”

“Prince Aleksandar, good morning.” Dr. Barlow had left the group of officers and crossed the bridge, the czar’s scroll in her hand. “I see you’ve met our visitor. Quite a fine example of Russian fabrication, is it not?”

“Good morning, madam.” Alek bowed. “I’m not sure what this creature is a fine example of, only that I find it a bit . . .” He swallowed, watching Dylan slip on a pair of thick falconer’s gloves.

“Literal-minded?” Dr. Barlow chuckled softly. “I suppose, but Czar Nicholas does enjoy his pets.”

“Pets, fah!” her loris repeated from its new perch on the messenger tern cages, and Bovril giggled. The two creatures began to whisper nonsense to each other, as they always did when they met.

Alek pulled his gaze from the eagle. “In fact, I’m more interested in the message it was carrying.”

“Ah . . .” Her hands began to roll up the scroll. “I’m afraid that is a military secret, for the moment.”

Alek scowled. His allies in Istanbul had never kept secrets from him.

If only he could have stayed there somehow. According to the newspapers, the rebels had control of the capital now, and the rest of the Ottoman Empire was falling under their sway. He would have been respected there—useful, instead of a waste of hydrogen. Indeed, helping the rebels overthrow the sultan had been the most useful thing he’d ever done. It had robbed the Germans of a Clanker ally and had proven that he, Prince Aleksandar of Hohenburg, could make a difference in this war.

Why had he listened to Dylan and come back to this abomination of an airship?

“Are you quite all right, Prince?” Dr. Barlow asked.

“I just wish I knew what you Darwinists were up to,” Alek said, a sudden quiver of anger in his voice. “At least if you were taking me and my men to London in chains, it would make sense. What’s the point of lugging us halfway around the world?”

Dr. Barlow spoke soothingly. “We all go where the war takes us, Prince Aleksandar. You haven’t had such bad luck on this ship, have you?”

Alek scowled but couldn’t argue. The Leviathan had saved him from spending the war hiding out in a freezing castle in the Alps, after all. And it had taken him to Istanbul, where he’d struck his first blow against the Germans.

He gathered himself. “Perhaps not, Dr. Barlow. But I prefer to choose my own course.”

“That time may come sooner than you think.”

Alek raised an eyebrow, wondering what she meant.

“Come on, your princeliness,” Dylan said. The eagle was now hooded and perching quietly on his arm. “It’s useless arguing with boffins. And we’ve got a bird to feed.”

© 2011 Scott Westerfeld

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 228 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(192)

4 Star

(26)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(5)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 229 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 2, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Highly Anticipated!

    I've read Leviathan and Behemoth, the books preceding Goliath. They were amazing! The idea of an alternate World War I with fabricated beasts and war machines makes an extraordinary read. Along with cross-dressing girls and runaway princes, I'm sure that Goliath will end the trilogy with a bang!

    13 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 28, 2011

    YEAH!

    Alek and Deryn are on the last leg of their round-the-world quest to end World War I, reclaim Alek's throne as prince of Austria, and finally fall in love. The first two objectives are complicated by the fact that their ship, the Leviathan, continues to detour farther away from the heart of the war (and crown). And the love thing would be a lot easier if Alek knew Deryn was a girl. (She has to pose as a boy in order to serve in the British Air Service.) And if they weren't technically enemies.

    The tension thickens as the Leviathan steams toward New York City with a homicidal lunatic on board: secrets suddenly unravel, characters reappear, and nothing is at it seems in this thunderous conclusion to Scott Westerfeld's brilliant trilogy. - (Simon and Schuster)


    you know what that means!!!

    6 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 23, 2011

    YAY!

    I loved the first two books. My only problem is that i really really hope that Scotted Westerfeld actually sets the romance instead of hinting towards it at thee end like he does in his other series like Uglies. Deryn and Alec 4ever. When he finds out, i think that a) he'll be very mad b) he'll be very confused c) he wont care because he loves her even though he thought she was a boy d) he'll think she is joking or e) all of the above. E is the easiest answer here, but who knows? Cant wait for the book!

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2012

    W

    "Dammit Jim, I'm a doctor, not a scientist". Best way to describe this book. Keith, I have a strong felling that if you don't countinue this series, riots will break out, there will be three days of darkness, swarms of locaust, volcanoes, earthquakes, MASS HYSTERIA!!!!!!!!! Pleas take this review seriusly. I am not the only fan that would love to see a WEDDING. Hint, hint, wink, wink. But seriusly this book is great, along with the others in the series. Please countine it with THE SAME CHARACTERS. Thank for your time.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    Love this series!

    I love this series, beautifully written and wonderfully made. Medium lexile and quick read. The covers aren't the best but don't judge them badly because of it. You would be missing out completely. The other books that lead up to this are:
    Leviathan
    Behemoth
    Hope this helps and enjoy the book.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 28, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Goliath is a truly satisfying end to a wonderful trilogy

    Alek and Deryn have circumnavigated most of the globe aboard the Darwinist airship Leviathan as they try to end World War I. Along the way, perhaps Alek will be able to claim his position as the true heir to Clanker Austria's throne. And perhaps Deryn will finally be able reveal her biggest secrets to Alek, namely that she is not just a girl but that she loves him.

    But as the Leviathan flies first to Siberia and then over the United States and Mexico, bigger problems arise as Deryn's secrets begin to unravel with alarming speed and Alek turns to a misguided lunatic in his continued efforts to end the War. The truth is supposed to set you free, but will it be enough to not just save Alek and Deryn but also end a war in Goliath (2011) by Scott Westerfeld (with illustrations by Keith Thompson)?

    Goliath is the phenomenal conclusion to Westerfeld's Leviathan trilogy which began with Leviathan and continued in Behemoth. It is also the perfect end to what is essentially a perfect trilogy. Goliath truly exceeded my already very high expectations.

    I worried about this book. What would happen to Deryn? Where would Alek end up? What about Alek and Deryn together? There were so many potential pitfalls and unfortunate conclusions. Westerfeld avoided all of them.

    Goliath is a truly satisfying end to a trilogy that was filled with actions and surprises from the very first pages to the very last. The whole series is a must read for anyone interested in speculative fiction, alternate histories or, of course, steampunk. As its dedication suggests, Goliath is also the perfect book for readers who appreciate a long-secret love story finally revealed. Truly wonderful.

    Possible Pairings: Fire and Hemlock by Diana Wynne Jones, Dream Hunter by Elizabeth Knox, The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick, The Scorpio Races by Maggie Stiefvater, Around the World in Eighty Days by Jules Verne

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 19, 2011

    I Also Recommend:

    Finallly!!!!

    I CANNOT wait for it to come out TOMORROW!

    3 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 19, 2011

    Awsome

    Gonna stay up till midnight

    3 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2011

    Epic

    This is a great book! I was so happy when Alek andnDeryn finally got together at the end:) Though I do wish that there was a prolouge about their future...
    Overall a great book if you like SciFi or Historical fiction

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 21, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Highly recommended

    once you pick this book up you wont be able to put it down. Great ending to an amazing trilogy!!

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2013

    To HELP

    Read nothing eat pizza and play video games!!!!! PS if you dont like video games read a book about them.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 19, 2011

    Gay Scare !!!! (PS thats a good thing ;P)

    The description reminds me of bloody jack where jaimy starts freaking out because he thinks he's turning gay( b/c he likes jacky). When he found out she was a girl he was just relieved XD LOL

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 13, 2011

    Inspiring+book+series

    I+can+say++that+the+first+two+books+were+amazing.+They+inspired+me+to+write+my+own+novel.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2014

    Highly Recommend - teens and adults

    My daughter (14 yrs) and I both read this series and really enjoyed them.
    Great adventure story with two strong characters.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2013

    There needs to be another book

    I need a fourth book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2013

    Ansolutely Wonderful!

    I absolutely loved this! I literally could not put this book down! I love how there is romance and tender feelings laced in with the action and great adventure! I have never loved a series more! Both of the authors did an amazing job with this! Perfect. Perfect job. I think the only think that could make it better would be to see this story on the big screen!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2013

    Awesome

    This series is incredibly well-written. I love how everything is semi-historically accurate. I really wished it focused on the romance more, though. And it would be great if the series continued, although the ending was very solid. Ugh, I wish Deryn wasn't taller than Alek. It makes the kiss at the end so much more unromantic - especially when you see the drawing.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2013

    Holly

    Go to book 25 plz i ment to say that lol

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2013

    Awesome but needs a fourth book.

    I liked every thing about the books but the ending was really short.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 4, 2012

    What is a Monkey Luddite?

    What the heck is a Monkey Luddite? They are referenced frequently and I really want to know. By the way, books 1+2 in the Leviathan trilogy are Leviathan + Behemoth. I love these books and didn't want them to end. Scott Westerfeld, if you ever read this, WRITE MORE LEVIATHAN-TYPE BOOKS please. I, as a budding author know that writers don't like being bossed around, but if you ever read this, please write more Leviathan style books.

    ~~~
    Maggie K

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