Lady Macbeth's Daughter

( 22 )

Overview

Raised by three strange sisters, Albia has never known the secrets of her parentage. But when Macbeth seeks out the weird sisters to foretell his fate, his life is entangled with his unknown daughter's. When Albia foresees the terrible future, she becomes determined to save Macbeth's rival—and the man she loves—from her murderous father. Klein's seamlessly drawn tale makes it seem impossible that Albia was not part of Shakespeare's original play.

...
See more details below
Hardcover
$15.32
BN.com price
(Save 9%)$16.99 List Price
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (36) from $1.99   
  • New (9) from $1.99   
  • Used (27) from $1.99   
Lady Macbeth's Daughter

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$6.49
BN.com price
(Save 7%)$6.99 List Price
Note: Visit our Teens Store.

Overview

Raised by three strange sisters, Albia has never known the secrets of her parentage. But when Macbeth seeks out the weird sisters to foretell his fate, his life is entangled with his unknown daughter's. When Albia foresees the terrible future, she becomes determined to save Macbeth's rival—and the man she loves—from her murderous father. Klein's seamlessly drawn tale makes it seem impossible that Albia was not part of Shakespeare's original play.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Jeanna Sciarrotta
Not every author is able to create a Shakespearian character so multidimensional that the reader forgets that she did not even exist in the original play, but that is exactly what author Lisa Klein did when she created Albia, daughter of the Macbeths. Albia's story begins when she is ripped from the hands of a young Lady Macbeth by her husband, tormented by his so-called fate, and destined to not have a male heir. Macbeth gives her to a servant to leave for dead—though this story would not take place had he carried out his orders. Instead she is kept secret and brought up deep in the woods by Rhuven and her sisters, better known as the weird sisters that proclaim Macbeth's fate in the Shakespearian play. Klein weaves together both the unknown story of Albia and the well-known demise of Lady Macbeth as she suffers in her guilt and, in this version of her life, the sorrow in having lost the daughter that she loved. The women live lives that are closely tied, even though neither have any knowledge of the other's existence in the world. Readers will be shocked at how well Klein is able to weave Albia into the story and the impact that she will cause on the downfall of her own father. High school English teachers will delight in the thought provoking discussions that will come out of using this as a supplemental text during the study of Macbeth—and even those less ambitious readers with little or no knowledge of the original text will find themselves drawn to the story. Reviewer: Jeanna Sciarrotta
VOYA - Lynne Farrell Stover
Strong and independent, the redheaded Albia learns that she is the daughter of Scotland's Macbeth as the woman who raised her approaches death. Albia is shocked at the news that because of her gender and deformed leg, her ruthless father ordered her destroyed. She was saved, however, and has lived happily with three sisters whose early interactions with Macbeth may have ironically contributed to his murderous behavior. When she turns fifteen, Albia is sent to live with a foster family. This event and the murder of Scotland's King Duncan create great changes in Albia's life. Unlike most young women of her era, Albia controls her future. Should she save Scotland from a heartless father driven mad by ambition? Will she marry to become queen or reject being a pawn in a power play for the throne? Can she forgive the mother who rejected her? The insertion of the young Albia in the retelling of Shakespeare's shortest tragedy, Macbeth, provides for a rich story and a greater understanding of life in eleventh-century Scotland. Because the story is written in first person by the alternating voices of Albia and Lady Macbeth, the reader is afforded contrasting views of identical situations. Intertwining Albia's story with that of the three witches is revealing and allows the reader an understanding of what may have motivated them to try to manipulate the future. Fans of historical fiction and Shakespearian tales should find this book thought provoking. Reviewer: Lynne Farrell Stover
School Library Journal
Gr 8 Up—This reworking of Macbeth is told in alternating points of view by Albia, Macbeth's daughter, and Grelach, her mother and Macbeth's wife. Because Albia is born with a crippled foot, Macbeth orders that she be killed. Grelach's servant rescues her, and she is raised by Rhuven's sisters. Albia grows up ignorant of her true heritage, believing herself to be Geillis's daughter. She realizes that she has second sight, and she begins to foresee terrifying, bloody events that are to come. After Macbeth murders King Duncan, Geillis sends her to be fostered by Banquo and his family. As the Scottish kingdom falls into even greater disorder under Macbeth's tyranny, Albia finds out the truth about her birth, and she must decide if she should use her gifts to overthrow her father and help bring order to the realm once again. A number of sections of the book are based directly on scenes from the play. This is a strong feminist reenvisioning of the original that raises issues about the treatment and social positions of women at the time. Grelach, Lady Macbeth, is far more sympathetic than in Shakespeare's version, and Albia is a compelling character who fights for the good of her country and refuses to allow anyone to use her as a political pawn. Klein has gone to historical sources predating Shakespeare's primary source, Holinshed's Chronicles, and has restored some of the history Shakespeare changed, most notably by including the character of Luoch, Grelach's son by her first husband. A great choice for teen book groups.—Kathleen E. Gruver, Burlington County Library, Westampton, NJ
Kirkus Reviews
As she did with Ophelia (2006), Klein turns a Shakespeare play on its head with a combination of feisty female lead and careful historical research. Inspired by the fact that Shakespeare's Lady Macbeth references nursing, the author creates cast-off daughter Albia, loved by the lady but scorned by Macbeth and raised in secret by three sisters-yes, those three. The novel is permeated with the question of responsibility: Is it the Weird Sisters, whose words spur Macbeth's crimes? Macbeth himself? Lady Macbeth? And what is Albia's responsibility, to herself and to Scotland, given her ancestry and power? Lady Macbeth narrates some of the tale, and while this moves the action, she is a murky character. She goads Macbeth but regrets his actions, mourns her daughter while neglecting her son (by a previous husband); indeed, she is as confused and confusing as the original. Fortunately Albia's engaging voice and struggles with her burgeoning psychic powers and with the truth of her parentage-plus her growing love for Fleance-make for a fast read with literary overtones. (Historical fantasy. 12 & up)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781599903477
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury USA
  • Publication date: 10/13/2009
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 458,458
  • Age range: 14 - 17 Years
  • Lexile: 730L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.30 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Lisa Klein

LISA KLEIN is the author of Lady Macbeth's Daughter, Two Girls of Gettysburg, and Ophelia. A former professor of English, she lives in Ohio with her family.

www.authorlisaklein.com

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 22 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(10)

4 Star

(7)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 22 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 19, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    excellent young adult retelling of Macbeth.

    In this novel, set in 11th century Scotland, author Lisa Klein starts with the premise that Macbeth and his wife had a baby daughter, born with a deformed leg. Macbeth, in his anger that she was not the healthy son he longed for, left the infant to die. Lady Macbeth, not much more than a girl herself in a time when women had no power, was helpless to stop him, and grieves the death of her daughter as well as the subsequent pregnancies she loses, believing herself cursed. These losses shape her character and set the stage for the tragic events she later participates in.

    What neither of them know, however, is that their baby daughter did not die. She was saved by Lady Macbeth's serving woman, Rhuven, who took her to live with her sisters in the Wychelm Wood. The sisters name the child Albia, and the little girl grows up believing one of the sisters to be her mother. The years pass by peacefully, until the year Albia turns fifteen and great turmoil comes to Scotland. King Duncan is murdered, and Albia is sent to live with a foster family - Banquo, his wife Breda, and their son Fleance. And there is turmoil inside Albia as well - she is confused by her feelings for the attractive but maddening Fleance, and she longs to know the identity of her father. When she learns the truth about her heritage - and that her birth parents murdered the king in order to seize the throne - she struggles with her feelings of revulsion at what her parents have done and determines that she must destroy them and bring peace and justice to Scotland.

    Lady Macbeth's Daughter is a rather interesting and complex novel. It is mainly told from the point of view of Albia, although we also see some events from the point of view of Lady Macbeth. Her perspective, and the difficult life she lived, made her actions, wrong though they were, seem more understandable. Overall the story and the ending especially were rather thought-provoking, making me think a lot about the motivations of various characters, and wondering what happened afterwards. I would recommend this book to readers, young adult and older, who enjoy either historical fiction or unique retellings of Shakespeare's plays.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 28, 2012

    I really enjoyed this book; I'd read the actual Shakespearean pl

    I really enjoyed this book; I'd read the actual Shakespearean play Macbeth, and it was OK, but this novel adds a whole new dimension to the story that makes it much more intriguing. The characters Klein introduces and expands upon seem to blend perfectly with those already existing. I definitely recommend this book, no matter whether you are a fan of Shakespeare or not.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 17, 2011

    I Also Recommend:

    Highly Recommend!

    I've found it hard to find a fresh, new interpretation of Macbeth, and after reading Klein's other book, Ophelia, I stumbled across this book. Klein deffinetly went on a stretch with creating a whole new character to add into the mix, but I really liked that. Having the story be told from someone outside all the craziness but still associated with it added new insight and innocence. I didn't really like that it switched perspectives from Albia (the added character; daughter of Lady Macbeth and Macbeth) and Lady Macbeth. I much preferred Albia's perspective.
    Overall, this is was a great read for any Macbeth or Shakespeare fan!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 18, 2013

    Great idea

    I love the idea behing the book and it was fun to read. Too short in my opinion

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2012

    Amazing

    My fav book ever ive read it like 6 times

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2011

    OmG

    Love this book its so super good!!!!!!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 6, 2014

    A monkey

    Your mom eats pudding while riding your pet unicorn and it gets shot with a confetti gun held by your dad who thinks he's captain america and punches your aunt in the face so he goes to stupid jail when he gets out he throws a purple bowling ball at you but you reflect it with purple bowling ball reflecting sheild that you got from the tooth fairy for haunica so your mom throws a blue bowling ball at you and you get hit in the face and wake up on a cloud palying a harp

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 21, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 11, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 21, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 8, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 7, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 29, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 9, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 22 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)