The Last Nude

( 19 )

Overview

“As erotic and powerful as the paintings that inspired it.”—Emma Donoghue, author of Room

Paris, 1927. One day in July, a young American named Rafaela Fano gets into the car of a coolly dazzling stranger, the Art Deco painter Tamara de Lempicka. Struggling to support herself, Rafaela agrees to model for the artist, a dispossessed Saint Petersburg aristocrat with a murky past. The two become lovers, and Rafaela inspires Tamara’s most iconic ...

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The Last Nude

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Overview

“As erotic and powerful as the paintings that inspired it.”—Emma Donoghue, author of Room

Paris, 1927. One day in July, a young American named Rafaela Fano gets into the car of a coolly dazzling stranger, the Art Deco painter Tamara de Lempicka. Struggling to support herself, Rafaela agrees to model for the artist, a dispossessed Saint Petersburg aristocrat with a murky past. The two become lovers, and Rafaela inspires Tamara’s most iconic Jazz Age images, among them her most accomplished—and coveted—works of art. A season as the painter’s muse teaches Rafaela some hard lessons: Tamara is a cocktail of raw hunger and glittering artifice. And all the while, their romantic idyll is threatened by history’s darkening tide. A tour de force of historical imagination, The Last Nude is about genius and craft, love and desire, regret and, most of all, hope that can transcend time and circumstance.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“[An] amazing book . . . wholly original and engrossing.”

The Boston Globe

The Last Nude breaks important ground for literature, and does so with exuberance, skill, and grace.”

San Francisco Chronicle

“A compulsively readable novel.”

The Washington Post

“A taut, elegant novel . . . [Avery’s] prose sings.”

MORE Magazine

“Seductive and compelling, the novel is painted with as much drama and precision as one of Lempicka’s canvases.”

The Daily Beast

“A sly, sleekly written stereograph of art, desire, and desperation in Paris in the ’20s, The Last Nude brings Rafaela to electric life, much as Tamara de Lempicka did when she painted her.”

—Alexander Chee, author of Edinburgh 

The Last Nude is a remarkable novel: at once a seductive evocation of Lost Generation Paris, a faithful literary rendering of Tamara de Lempicka's idiosyncratic and groundbreaking art, and a vibrant, intelligent, affecting story in its own right. It’s also smoking hot.”

—Emily Barton, author of Brookland

“Ellis Avery transports the reader on a fast-paced magic-carpet ride to Paris between the world wars, a time when artists, patrons, and models fused the business of sex and art, with deeply painful results.”

—Aaron Hamburger, author of Faith for Beginners

The Last Nude carries us through one of the most fascinating and turbulent periods in modern art, and into the minds and bodies of two of art history’s most riveting heroines. With prose and imagery that are both lyrical and unabashedly sensual, Ellis Avery breathes life and depth into famed artist’s muse Rafaela, tracing her rocky but thrilling path from lost girl to Lost Generation icon, and laying bare acts of love, desire and betrayal with all the assuredness of a master artist herself.”

—Jennifer Cody Epstein, author of The Painter from Shanghai

Kathryn Lang
As in her first novel…Avery deftly re-creates a lost period…[The Last Nude is] a compulsively readable novel that brings to life a diva whose biography is as titillating as her paintings.
—The Washington Post
Publishers Weekly
In Avery’s second novel (after The Teahouse Fire), poor young Rafaela meets Polish painter Tamara de Lempicka in 1920s Paris. Rafaela is no stranger to the currency of sex (“I had traded sex for a train ticket, for an apartment, for a coat and hat and shoes, and most recently... for money”). Before meeting de Lempicka, however, Rafaela had never gone to bed because she wanted to, and the artist awakens the young woman’s desire. Centered around de Lempicka’s provocative nudes of Rafaela, the novel chronicles the shifting boundaries between artist and muse over the course of a heated affair. The relationship is tested when the prestigious Salon d’Automne jury accepts two of de Lempicka’s Rafaela paintings, The Dream and La Bella Rafaela. De Lempicka receives an offer for the latter work before the exhibit even opens, and Rafaela’s portrait becomes a sensation, leaving her uncertain of what to expect in the wake of success, especially from her lover. Though at times contrived, the strength of Avery’s novel lies in her depiction of a driven and accomplished artist and an impressionable waif who finds that her beauty no longer belongs to her. (Jan.)
Oprah.com
“What’s not to love about Ellis Avery’s romantic novel.”
Oprah.com
San Francisco Chronicle
“Absorbing, affecting, and agitating . . . this work is highly recommended.”
Library Journal [HC starred review]
The Boston Globe
“The strength of Avery’s novel lies in her depiction of a driven and accomplished artist and an impressionable waif who finds that her beauty no longer belongs to her.”
Publishers Weekly
More Magazine
“What’s not to love about Ellis Avery’s romantic novel.”
Oprah.com
Booklist
“Plummer . . . captures [young Rafaela’s] appealing energy. . . . Caruso narrates the artist’s part just as convincingly. . . . This is an excellent production of a fascinating story.”
AudioFile
Sound Commentary
“Breaks important ground for literature, and does so with exuberance, skill and grace.”
San Francisco Chronicle
Library Journal
In 1927, bold and glamorous Polish artist Tamara de Lempicka encountered 17-year-old Rafaela while in Paris's Bois de Boulogne and took her home, using her as a model for six significant paintings (including Beautiful Rafaela) and briefly becoming her lover. De Lempicka was working on a copy of Beautiful Rafaela when she died in 1980. Inspired by these bare facts, Avery (The Teahouse Fire) has crafted an evocative, heart-cutting work that imagines the relationship between artist and model. Traveling from New York to Italy for an arranged marriage, Rafaela escapes from her chaperone and, "trad[ing] sex for a train ticket," heads for Paris. There she's gloriously free but living on the edge; when de Lempicka finds her, she's gone to borrow money from a street-walking friend. Avery does a lot for us here, creating two stunning characters—the earthy, heartfelt Rafaela and the conniving de Lempicka—then shows us both the heat of their relationship and the very act of creating art. In the bargain, we get Paris itself, particularly demimonde and artistic, boiling over with possibility. VERDICT Absorbing, affecting, and agitating—you'll end up wanting to punch de Lempicka—this work is highly recommended. [See Prepub Alert, 7/5/11.]—Barbara Hoffert, Library Journal
Kirkus Reviews
Avery (The Teahouse Fire, 2006, etc.) is right in step with the current publishing trend toward romantic yet literary historical fiction with this imagined romance between the cubist/art deco artist Tamara de Lempicka and the model Rafaela, who appears in six of her paintings. The first, longer section of the novel is told from half-Italian-American Catholic/half-Jewish Rafaela Fano's viewpoint and set among the sexually fluid ex-pats of Paris in 1927. On her way from the Bronx to an arranged marriage in Italy at age 17, Rafaela runs away to Paris, where she quickly becomes part of the demimonde. Rafaela meets 27-year-old Tamara de Lempicka in the Bois de Boulogne (a factual encounter), and Tamara takes her home to pose. Already an established painter, Tamara is an aristocratic émigré from Poland by way of Russia and the mother of a young daughter. She is also going through a difficult divorce and has had affairs with men and women. Soon Tamara and Rafaela are lovers. Rafaela has been paid for sex by numerous men, but for the first time she falls in love. What Tamara feels is less clear because she lives within a self-invented, larger-than-life persona. She is a serious artist and her sexual passion for Rafaela seems real, but so is her passion for money. Soon she embroils Rafaela in a scheme that pits two wealthy art buyers in a competition over who gets the second version of her painting "Beautiful Rafaela," a painting she promises Rafaela she will never sell. The novel's shorter second section shifts to 1980 Mexico, where the aged Tamara spends her last days. Steeped in largely feminine/lesbian sensuality and peopled by famous and cultural figures of pre–World War II Europe, the novel is a dark, sexy romp, although it ends in a disappointing whimper.
The Barnes & Noble Review
There are books –– and thank heaven for them –– that refuse to accommodate themselves to our mundane lives. The reader must squeeze into theirs. Forget about the deadline and the groceries, the conference call and the laundry. The year is 1917 and you are going to Paris. Magnolia trees, a jewel–green motorcar, a woman with a dog –– it's the Bois de Boulogne, and you don't have a thing to wear.

Which is fine, tant pis, because at least a third of the sultry novel The Last Nude takes place in the altogether. The author herself credits a nude as inspiration: when Ellis Avery first saw Beautiful Rafaela, a 1927 oil painting by Polish artist Tamara de Lempicka, at a show at the Royal Academy in London in 2004, she found it, as she says, "hair–raisingly sexy." The painting is rich –– dark, moody; the woman's skin glows, and every edge is round and graceful. She fills the canvas, leaving no room for any other thought. It is one of those unforgettable paintings that shifts a viewer into its own emotional space.

Avery, unlike de Lempicka, has only words, a linear array of black–and–white symbols. A gifted writer, she polishes those words until they lift into color, and strings them like beads that pulse with rhythm and movement. Playing throughout her story with the contrast between beautiful and ugly, good and venal, amusing and pitiful, Avery seduces just as effectively as her beguiling subjects. We are, as they say, putty in her hands.

Beauitful Rafaela was, in real life and in the novel, a seventeen–year–old girl de Lempicka (then twenty–seven) met in the Bois de Boulogne –– the park has long doubled as a red–light district –– in 1927. She asked Rafaela to pose for her, and the two women fell in love. Avery dials the story back to trace Rafaela's route from America to Paris as a refugee from a planned engagement: her mother and stepfather, back in the Bronx, have arranged a marriage to a young Italian boy and booked Rafaela's passage to Italy. Already beautiful at sixteen, she meets an older man on the ship and flees with him to Paris, land of Chanel dresses, the Ritz, and Sylvia Beach's bookstore. But once the relationship fizzles, Rafaela must live by her wits, doing things for money she would prefer not to do and trying to hold on to both dignity and spirit. She sews her own clothes and, fully disowned by her mother, knows she has to make it on her own.

Enter de Lampicka, a beautiful, greyhound–thin, golden–skinned Polish countess who is estranged from her husband and living with her young daughter, painting six hours a day and trolling the parks and streets of Paris for models. She offers Rafaela 100 francs, takes her back to her studio in the Seventh Arrondissement –– and the Bronx recedes for all of us.

The paintings she makes of Rafaela become the talk of the town and are highly, obsessively coveted by wealthy aristocrats and government officials. There is too much absinthe, too much style, too much money, and too much sex: emotions harden into things, things that can be purchased, a transaction that does not have much to do with love.

And here, something interesting happens between the reader and the novel. The literary pheromones that propel a reader through the novel's first delicious scenes dissipate slightly but noticeably. The narrative gets between us and the beauty we were originally bewitched by, and it looks flimsy in the cold light of day. We long to scurry back into the painting, a shelter from ugliness (laundry, conference calls, and traffic jams). We resent the story, and it does not hold up well under our resentment.

The relationship between Tamara and Rafaela gets tarnished, and poof! –– they are less interesting. Waiter, another glass of champagne! We swan off to another corner of the mirrored room. Avery tries to lure us back with chocolates and cognac, a Saarinen table, but it's too late. Tamara is getting old and paranoid. Rafaela has moved on. "The year my husband left –– the year I feared poverty most," thinks Tamara many years later, "was the freest year of my life, and the day I met Rafaela was the freest day. A man could find what he wanted in the Bois as a matter of course, but I was a woman, and I got her in my car anyway."

Avery captures that freedom, and the abandon that follows. It is enough. It is enough.

Susan Salter Reynolds is a writer and book critic. She is a regular contributor to the Los Angeles Times.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781594486470
  • Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 12/31/2012
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 352
  • Sales rank: 491,043
  • Product dimensions: 5.10 (w) x 7.90 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Ellis Avery

Ellis Avery’s first novel, The Teahouse Fire, set in the tea ceremony world of nineteenth-century Japan, has been translated into five languages and has won three awards, including the American Library Association Stonewall Award. Avery is also the author of The Smoke Week, an award-winning 9/11 memoir. She teaches fiction writing at Columbia University and lives in New York City.

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Reading Group Guide

INTRODUCTION
A stunning story of love, sexual obsession, treachery, and tragedy, about an artist and her most famous muse in Paris between the world wars.

Paris, 1927. In the heady years before the crash, financiers drape their mistresses in Chanel, while expatriates flock to the avant-garde bookshop Shakespeare and Company. One day in July, a young American named Rafaela Fano gets into the car of a coolly dazzling stranger, the Art Deco painter Tamara de Lempicka.

Struggling to halt a downward slide toward prostitution, Rafaela agrees to model for the artist, a dispossessed Saint Petersburg aristocrat with a murky past. The two become lovers, and Rafaela inspires Tamara's most iconic Jazz Age images, among them her most accomplished-and coveted-works of art. A season as the painter's muse teaches Rafaela some hard lessons: Tamara is a cocktail of raw hunger and glittering artifice. And all the while, their romantic idyll is threatened by history's darkening tide.

Inspired by real events in de Lempicka's history, The Last Nude is a tour de force of historical imagination. Ellis Avery gives the reader a tantalizing window into a lost Paris, an age already vanishing as the inexorable forces of history close in on two tangled lives. Spellbinding and provocative, this is a novel about genius and craft, love and desire, regret and, most of all, hope that can transcend time and circumstance.

ABOUT ELLIS AVERY

Ellis Avery is the author of The Teahouse Fire.The winner of three awards, The Teahouse Fire was translated into five languages. Avery teaches fiction writing at Columbia University and lives in New York City.

A CONVERSATION WITH ELLIS AVERY
Q. What about this second novel-a technique, or a subject-was a stretch for you?

My first novel, The Teahouse Fire, was about the tea ceremony of Meiji-era Japan. Because the subject matter was one most American readers know little to nothing about, I felt an almost missionary obligation to offer the reader everything I knew about that world-to lecture, really-and the book is paced accordingly.

My second novel, The Last Nude, takes place in Paris between the wars, a setting about which most readers know at least a little, and many readers know far more than I. It isn't news that flappers listened to jazz in the twenties, or that Europe in the forties was a bad place to be if you were Jewish. This time around, I had to learn how not to lecture but to converse, how to give the reader the pleasure of supplying missing information, how to leave things out.

The result of leaving things out is, I hope, a more fast-paced novel than my first. I went into this book thinking about the various pitfalls artists can encounter-surfeit in Tamara de Lempicka's case, loss in Anson Hall's, history in Rafaela Fano's-and I knew that if I was writing a novel about something as un-American as failure, I should at least try to make it sexy and suspenseful.

Q. Between the moment you first thought of writing The Last Nude and the moment you finished it, what in the story or in your conception of Tamara and Rafaela changed most?

At first, I had no idea I would wind up writing sixty pages in the first person from Tamara's point of view. As I discovered a year and a half after having done so, adding her voice meant that, as Tamara, I could skip over things that, as Rafaela, I would have needed to expand on. To that end, I condensed 110 pages from Rafaela's point of view into two sentences from Tamara's, resulting in a leaner if somewhat darker book.

Cutting out a quarter of my novel at the last minute of the editing process reweighted the story away from Rafaela's coming-of-age and onto the vexed relationship between the two women: now I think the book bears down more squarely on a key question: What did the affair mean to each of them?

The other thing that changed most is that I initially imagined an unabashedly happy ending for Rafaela: I saw her in California, living with a nice woman she'd met while studying the bodywork techniques pioneered by Ida Rolf. Groovy, huh? This ending was total fantasy, extraneous to the central action of the story, and very like the ending of my first novel, The Teahouse Fire. That novel takes place in the Victorian period, and offers a self-consciously Victorian ending: Good is rewarded, love comes at last. Most of the action of The Last Nude takes place in 1927, so ultimately it felt wrong to force a Victorian ending onto a Jazz Age novel. What's more, in the next decades, so many Jews were killed in Europe that to report Rafaela's survival without making the story of how she survived the focus of the book would be to disrespect the millions who died.

Q. At what points did you find you had to change a fact in order to make a better fiction?

First, if Tamara's apartment and the train station had been on the same side of the Seine, there would have been no need for Rafaela to cross the river on a crucial occasion toward the end of the book. For that reason, although the biographical Tamara-whom I got to know through the excellent work of Laura Claridge-lived in what was at the time the newish-money Sixteenth Arrondissement of Paris, my fictional Tamara lives in the old-money Seventh.

Second, when I finished my first novel, set in 1880s Japan, I promised myself that my next book would be about English speakers. Of course, next thing you know, I'm fired up to write about a Polish painter who grew up speaking French. Partly because the biographical Tamara never specified the biographical Rafaela's nationality or origins, and largely for my own sake, to avoid writing another book full of translated dialogue, I have taken the liberty of imagining an English-speaking Rafaela.

Third, and most interesting to me as a writer, there's a quietly counterfactual strand to this novel, which appears in the character of Anson Hall. Hemingway buffs will wonder why Anson has the first name of one of Hemingway's grandfathers and the last name of the other, and also why I have claimed the story that Hemingway's wife lost all his manuscripts on a train as Anson's story. While Hemingway overcame the loss of his manuscripts and went on to write his great first novels, Anson Hall is the man Hemingway would have become if he had never overcome that loss: a nicer person than Ernest Hemingway, but a sadder one, too.

In thinking about the pitfalls artists can encounter, I wanted to play out the consequences of creative failure, which for me meant envisioning a world in which certain works of art had never come into being. I suspect that the world we live in is a poorer place for its paucity of artworks by women and other oppressed peoples, but a negative assertion lacks the force of example. So I needed to eliminate a real artist. I know I poke fun at James Joyce in this novel, however much I owe the inspiration for Tamara's final monologue to Molly Bloom, but I wanted to make a sacrifice that actually pained me, so Hemingway was the author whose life story I altered. What would 1927 Paris be if The Sun Also Rises hadn't come out in 1926? Jazz Age Paris without Hemingway in it-and an interwar literary tradition in which Gabriele D'Annunzio's name replaced Hemingway's-would be pallid indeed, and my own life without A Moveable Feast in it would be so much the poorer.

Q. Could the relationship between Tamara and Rafaela have happened anytime, or do you see it as specific to Paris in the twenties?

I don't see Paris in the twenties as simply the setting in which the biographical Tamara happened to be painting when she created Beautiful Rafaela, the painting that inspired this book. Rather, what's remarkable about expatriate Jazz Age Paris is that it provided an environment in which a number of different kinds of romantic and sexual relationships between women flourished in a way they rarely had before. You know the examples as well as I: Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas, Sylvia Beach and Adrienne Monnier, Janet Flanner and Solita Solano, Bryher and H.D., to say nothing of Natalie Barney, Djuna Barnes, Radclyffe Hall-and did Virginia Woolf ever make it to Paris? My point is, in the 1920s, and especially in Paris, you see a concentration of lesbians in the arts, and at the center of the modernist movements in literature and painting especially, that strikes me as singular and profoundly exciting. These circles, however, have already been documented by top-notch scholars and biographers, and I'd be bored if I stuck to dramatizing the research of others.

Rather, I was interested in a world in which two women like Tamara and Rafaela can have an affair and have vastly different interpretations of what it means. It's not like Rafaela thinks she's inventing a new category of relationship from scratch when she falls in love with Tamara: surrounded by appealing models of what look to her like marriages between women, she imagines she's embarking on one of them. At the same time, this is so long before Stonewall-let alone before same-sex marriage becomes legal anywhere-that Tamara can see what she's engaging in solely in terms of sexual freedom, or decadent naughtiness, or a painter's prerogative: certainly nothing remotely related to marriage.

So I see the relationship between Tamara and Rafaela as specific to this time and place, which was one in which sexual acts between women seemed more possible than in preceding or subsequent decades and one in which the meaning of those acts was perhaps even more up for grabs than it is today.

(My partner Sharon Marcus's scholarly work on nineteenth-century marriage between women has influenced my own thinking considerably.)

Q. How does a painter's job differ from a writer's?

I sat for two paintings when I was in my twenties. The experience itself was as dull as (sorry) watching paint dry, but I found myself thinking things I hadn't thought before, both about what it's like to be in a body and about what it's like to look and be looked at. I promised myself I'd come back to those thoughts one day.

As part of the research for this book, I took a weeklong intensive figure-painting class, less to become a painter than to see what it's like on the other side of the brush. What's it like to stare at the same beautiful naked woman for sixteen hours? I wasn't surprised to find that my reactions changed from sexual excitement to visual and spatial problem-solving within the first few minutes of each class. Nor was I surprised by the frustration I felt when the time ran out on each pose and I'd barely begun. What surprised me was the feeling of delight-of love, even-that washed over me on the second day of class when the same model came back, a feeling that felt separate from the private, individual me, who said no more than "Hi" to her each morning and "Thank you" to her each afternoon. I name that feeling in The Last Nude as "a gratitude, a joy that translates badly into words. I know how to mix these colors. I know what to do with these lines."

While I can't get behind the seigneurial assumptions that make painters think they have the right to sleep with their models, I wouldn't have understood the layers of the painter's reaction to the model, which consists of innocent gratitude and joy, if I hadn't experienced it myself.

(Thanks to that class, I also learned the answer to a question that had been puzzling me for years: Why is Western art so preoccupied with breasts? Because they're easy to draw!)

Based on my limited experience of painting and modeling, I think the biggest difference between writers and painters lies in our relationship to labor and time. A viewer can experience a painting in an instant, no matter how long it took the painter to create the image, while a reader has to take time to read all the author's words, little by little, left to right, so that the work of art can take hours or days to make its full impression. Conversely, a fiction writer can write something like "Sally Bowles showed up in a new fur coat" in a few seconds, while a figurative painter would need hours to render an image of Sally and her coat: all those sequins, all that fur, all those brushstrokes.

I think my pacing of the affair between Rafaela and Tamara replicates the tension between instantaneity and slowness that seems peculiar to visual artists: the novel begins with Rafaela making an impulsive, instantaneous choice to do exactly what our mothers always told us not to do: get into a car with a stranger. But then the pace slows dramatically to accommodate what my painter friend Caroline Wampole calls "the hours in the paint" that transpire between artist and model, the hours of looking and being looked at that allow, in Rafaela's case, for the slow blossoming of love, and of her own vocation.

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

  • Do you think Rafaela made the right decision in eluding her grandmother and going to Paris?
  • How does Tamara change Rafaela’s life? How does Rafaela change after they first meet? After she finds out the truth about Tamara’s intentions?
  • How do Gin and Rafaela’s relationships (with Daniel and Tamara) mirror each other?
  • What kind of an artist is Tamara? Rafaela? Anson?
  • How does each character (Rafaela, Tamara, Anson, Gin) support him or herself? To what extent do Rafaela and Tamara’s means of financial support affect the choices they make?
  • Has Tamara changed in the second half of the novel? If yes, how?
  • Which woman needs the other more? Why? Does this change over the course of the novel?
  • The paintings that appear in this book serve different functions. How do you think Tamara’s Duchesse de la Salle portrait, La Belle Rafaela, and The Dream serve the story? How does Vermeer’s The Lacemaker serve it?
  • The last line in the book is “This time, I have painted your eyes open.” What is Tamara trying to say? How did you respond to this ending?
  • How does Rafaela’s relationship to Anson evolve over the course of the novel? Did your view of him change at all?
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 19 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 19 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 17, 2011

    Last Nude

    Paris in the Twenties comes alive in this beatiful novel.

    3 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 1, 2013

    Enjoyable reading

    I am a great admirer of her art. It was fascinating to read about the person in some of de Lempicka's most fampus paintings.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 23, 2013

    To k

    Come on

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 20, 2012

    Interesting!

    Well written and kept my attention up to and including the very last page. While none of the characters were appealing (a bit on the sleazy side, questionable morals, etc.), I nevertheless found myself interested in their thinking and doing. If you are a reader who doesn't have to love the people about whom you are reading, then you will find this a very interesting book.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 3, 2012

    Should have ended sooner

    The Last Nude is another example of taking a good story and stretching it to a novel. The story begins as Raphaela’s story and it is an enjoyable read. Ellis Avery lures the reader into Raphaela’s life and creates empathy for the character.

    The book was difficult to put down through the first chapters, then, in explicably Avery changes the novel to Tamara’s story. With the shift the book was no longer compelling. In fact, it became quite difficult to continue reading as not only was Tamara an unlikeable character, but, Avery’s writing style seemed to slip as well.

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  • Posted March 28, 2012

    A really good read

    I enjoy The Last Nude immensely. Both the main characters were well-drawn and the combination of the art/art scene, and the coming out/love story drew me right in and kept me riveted through the book. I wish it had been longer.

    The only minor disappointment was the switch in point of view in the last chapter.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2012

    Not your mother's book

    Lots of dialogue and drama. Not just the history of a painter whom I have come to admire, but more the exciting adventures of a nineteen year old Italian-American castoff. Entertaining, raw, and unashamed of the human flesh. Not your mother's book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2012

    Bella Rafaela

    Even moreso, that there is no closure for Tamara. Great read.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 18, 2012

    Boring

    Biggest waste of time and money invested in a book in years. Wish I wouldve paid attention to others negative comments on this one.

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  • Posted February 14, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Brought this book with me to Paris...

    And I was not disappointed.

    Ms. Avery brought the art and beauty of Paris alive, while balancing out that dreamy image with a reality of a young woman struggling to make her way.

    I did enjoy the first half of the book much more than the second half, but that being said, I was ecstatic to have a chance to read this book as soon as it came out. And, what better place to do it than Paris where I could almost imagine the exact scenes taking place.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2012

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    Posted January 6, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2012

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    Posted January 22, 2012

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    Posted January 25, 2012

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    Posted February 12, 2012

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    Posted February 3, 2012

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    Posted January 7, 2012

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    Posted April 15, 2014

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