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Malcolm X on Afro-American History
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Malcolm X on Afro-American History

5.0 4
by Malcolm X
 

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Recounts the hidden history of the labor of people of African origin and their achievements.

Index

Overview

Recounts the hidden history of the labor of people of African origin and their achievements.

Index

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780873485920
Publisher:
Pathfinder Press GA
Publication date:
06/01/1990
Series:
Malcolm X Speeches and Writings
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
104
Sales rank:
453,639
Product dimensions:
5.28(w) x 8.29(h) x 0.31(d)

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Malcolm X on Afro-American History 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The theme of this small book can be summed up by a quote from Malcolm X; In early 1965 a reporter from the Village Voice was interviewing Malcolm, Malcolm said at one point, 'You have to wake people up first, then you'll get action.' 'Wake them up to their exploitation?' The reporter asked. 'No,' Malcolm said, 'to their humanity, to their own self worth, and to their heritage.' The thrust of this small book was Malcolm's efforts, in part, to do some of that. The centerpiece of the book is a speech on Afro-American History which Malcolm gave in 1965. The speech appears in it's entirety. The book also contains excerpts from his autobiography and portions of speeches and interviews. This is a gem of a book from one of the outstanding revolutionists of this century.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This priceless little book consists of a talk Malcolm X gave just a month before he was assassinated in 1965. You will find a rich analysis of then contemporary local, national and international issues, exposure of little-known African civilizations, and an inspiring perspective on advancing the Afro-American liberation struggle along with the struggles of other oppressed and exploited people throughout the world.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This little book packs a powerful punch. Malcolm X explains clearly, and often in a humorous way, how knowing the truth about your history is necessary for building a movement to tear down racism and build a better society. The heart of the book is a speech that Malcolm gave less than a month before his death. His point is that Black people have to become aware of their true accomplishments in the past in order to change the world in the present and future. By looking at ancient African civilizations, West African kingdoms, the rise of imperialism and the history of slavery in America, Malcolm shows that Black people have played a huge role in shaping human history. Even though he spoke at a time when Black History Month was still Black History Week, his message is still totally relevant as African-Americans still face the challenge of leading a movement that can end police brutality, racist violence, political oppression and economic exploitation, while joining up with working people and the oppressed around the world. The impact of Malcolm¿s speech is magnified by his own explanation of how he studied Black history while in prison; and by a nice set of graphics and maps which illustrate his points.
Guest More than 1 year ago
To oppress a people you have to suppress, or at least deny, its history. The oppression of Afro-Americans is no exception to this law. In a 1965 speech, as well as in selections from his Autobiography and other works, Malcolm X uncovers the real record of Africa, the slave system, neocolonialism, and what they mean for Blacks today. This book tells you a great deal why those who defended the political and economic status quo hated Malcolm X so much, and why youth seeking to fight that system see him as such an example.