Momofuku

( 38 )

Overview

Never before has there been a phenomenon like Momofuku. A once-unrecognizable word, it's now synonymous with the award-winning restaurants of the same name in New York City: Momofuku Noodle Bar, Ssäm Bar, Ko, and Milk Bar. Chef David Chang has single-handedly revolutionized cooking in America with his use of bold Asian flavors and impeccable ingredients, his mastery of the humble ramen noodle, and his thorough devotion to pork. 

Momofuku is both the story and the recipes ...

See more details below
Hardcover
$26.88
BN.com price
(Save 32%)$40.00 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (15) from $22.57   
  • New (11) from $22.57   
  • Used (4) from $22.57   
Momofuku

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$21.99
BN.com price

Overview

Never before has there been a phenomenon like Momofuku. A once-unrecognizable word, it's now synonymous with the award-winning restaurants of the same name in New York City: Momofuku Noodle Bar, Ssäm Bar, Ko, and Milk Bar. Chef David Chang has single-handedly revolutionized cooking in America with his use of bold Asian flavors and impeccable ingredients, his mastery of the humble ramen noodle, and his thorough devotion to pork. 

Momofuku is both the story and the recipes behind the cuisine that has changed the modern-day culinary landscape. Chang relays with candor the tale of his unwitting rise to superstardom, which, though wracked with mishaps, happened at light speed. And the dishes shared in this book are coveted by all who've dined—or yearned to—at any Momofuku location (yes, the pork buns are here). This is a must-read for anyone who truly enjoys food.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
It is likely that Manhattan food denizens will greet this book with mixed feelings. On one hand, they will welcome the opportunity to finally have the recipes of master chef David Chang's pork buns and traditional dashi; on the other, they will instantly realize that the restaurant that they once treasured as an East Village secret has now become known to the whole world. Momofuko (literally "lucky peach" in Japanese) first opened in 2003 as a modest First Avenue noodle bar. Since then, Chang and his restaurants have won several James Beard Awards and been the subject of an extended "Chef on the Edge" New Yorker article and Charlie Rose interview. This is the first book by one of the most celebrated young chefs in the county.
From the Publisher
“David Chang is magical–that’s why it’s so difficult to explain what he does. I can only tell you that you need to experience his cooking; it will move you deeply. He is a chef of prodigious talent–and also a great guy.” —Ferran Adrià

“The breathless hype is true. His food is as good and as exciting as everyone says it is. David Chang has opened up a new direction in dining and cooking. With his troika of Momofukus, he changed the whole game. Scary-smart, funny, and ambitious, the wildly creative Chang is the guy all chefs have got to measure themselves by these days.” —Anthony Bourdain

“As a food professional I am always on the look out for the new, the different, and the delicious. It was with great pleasure that one day I tasted David Chang’s pork buns at Momofuku. Since then, I have sampled almost all of his delectable creations and I am so pleased that I finally have a book of recipes that will allow me to try to emulate them at home.” —Martha Stewart

“[Chang is] at the forefront of the modern pork-meat-rules movement. Some of the recipes are very simple, but even the ones that are too involved for the home cook offer a fascinating window into the mind of Chang.” –Newsday
 
“One of the most talked-about restaurant books of the season is David Chang’s Momofuku…. It’s exciting to think that thousands of American kitchens will soon be stocked with dashi, kochukaru and fish sauce…. In both food and tone, Momofuku encapsulates an exciting moment in New York dining.” –New York Times Book Review
 
“Chang’s latest, perfectly timed move is his first cookbook. Like his restaurants, the book’s generosity of spirit and lack of pretension will, I suspect, outwit the hyperpicky bitchery that hype tends to unleash. Useful flavor-amping recipes that range from sensible and easy (scallion oil) to advanced (“ghetto sous vide” steak) are broken up by insightful ingredient histories, how-tos, and vicariously thrilling autobiographical anecdotes…” –Elle magazine
 
“Broken into three categories from Chang’s three Momofuku restaurants—Noodle Bar, Ssam Bar and Ko—all the good stuff is in the book: from Chang’s famous pork buns to pig’s head torchon to the ramen that started it all.” –New York Daily News
 
“…Mr. Chang, with assistance from Peter Meehan, who has written for The New York Times, writes about a chef’s life in a way that feels completely fresh. The recipes, including those from the ginger-scallion noodles and roasted pork belly served at Noodle Bar, are almost perks; this would be a great read even without them.” –New York Times
 
“A recipe for bacon dashi—a basic stock used in several of the book’s recipes—reflects Mr. Chang’s blending of the familiar with the entirely new…. The result is a delicious brew that captures the clean brininess of Japanese cuisine and the finger-licking tastiness of American food.” –Wall Street Journal
 
“…[T]his book offers something that you can’t get at Chang’s restaurants: a chance to get into the mind of one of America’s most interesting chefs.” –Fine Cooking
 
“…Momofuku is a must-have, if not only for its faux-wood-paneled cover and signature peach on the front. Inside, it’s what we’ve all been waiting for: some good, solid time with Chang in his element…and a peek into the philosophy that helped make him one of the most sought-after chefs in the country without any help from the Food Network.” –Manhattan magazine
 
“The most exciting cookbook of the season, to me, is without question, Momofuku, by David Chang and Peter Meehan. Momofuku combines great cooking and restaurant kitchen photography in the journalistic style I love, recipes and techniques I was eager to learn about…and an intense, passionate narrative by Meehan that captures the distinctive nature of this unusual chef.” –Michael Ruhlman
 
“I read this cookbook with the same exhilarating glee I previously had only experienced with my favorite novels. It’s the whole package: great recipes, great design, great story, great telling. This is going to be the French Laundry Cookbook for the next generation of chefs and cooks.” –EatMeDaily.com, Best Overall Cookbook of 2009
 
“…[T]his first cookbook from three-time James Beard Award winner David Chang lays bare the talent and obsession that has propelled the New York chef to stardom. Its gorgeous photos, sleek, personable narrative and more than 100 recipes will inspire anyone who loves restaurants—or, just bacon.” –Associated Press
 
“…the read is as intriguing as the food.” –Charleston Post and Courier
 
“Let me come right out and say it: David Chang is the best chef this country’s ever produced…. Chang’s collaborator, former New York Times columnist Peter Meehan, has done a superb job of shaping the material and letting Chang be Chang…. But it would be hard for any passionate cook, or artist, or anyone who’s interested in the creative process, not to devour this book.” –Denver Post

Christine Muhlke
In both food and tone, Momofuku encapsulates an exciting moment in New York dining. In 20 years, when we're all eating McKimchi burgers and drinking cereal milk, we'll look back fondly on the time when neurotic indie stoners and their love of Benton's bacon changed the culinary landscape.
—The New York Times
Publishers Weekly
Chang, master restaurateur and chef, and Meehan, a New York Times food writer, join forces in this stellar collection of recipes from Chang's restaurants—Momofuku, Ssäm Bar and Ko. Chang is a man possessed with a deep love of ramen and a clear passion for food. This book pays tribute to the humble noodle, which Chang has elevated to a near art form, and the wide array of cuisine he serves. Filled with 150 gorgeous, full-color photos and an engrossing narrative, this book is a treat for the eye, mind and palate. Chang's special touches are seen in every dish. Chicken wings are cooked with bacon in rendered pork or duck fat, and pan-roasted asparagus are adorned with poached eggs and miso butter. Fried (or roasted) cauliflower is drizzled with fish sauce vinaigrette, and roasted New Jersey diver scallops are served with kohlrabi puree and iwa nori. Of course, recipes for noodles abound, including Momofuku ramen, ginger scallion noodles, and Alkaline Noodles. Other staples include ramen broth, ramen toppings, and rice with miso soup. Be forewarned: Chang gears the cookbook to only the most experienced of cooks, with many dishes requiring several steps. Nevertheless, Chang presents a collection both stunning and engaging. (Oct.)
Library Journal
In his first cookbook, coauthored with food writer Meehan, culinary star Chang uses recipes and essays to trace the evolution of his Momofuku restaurant group from one struggling ramen shop to four New York City restaurants (Momofuku Noodle Bar, Milk Bar, Ssäm Bar, and Ko) lauded by the James Beard Foundation, the Michelin Guide, and numerous food publications. The first restaurant, which initially emulated ramen and noodle shops Chang had visited while teaching English in Japan, seemed likely to fail until he abandoned his original concept for a more personal approach that blended traditional preparations with unconventional or seasonal ingredients. The distinctive recipes here reflect Chang's growth as a chef and his passion for noodles and pork products. Consequently, it is not vegetarian friendly. While many recipes are technically accessible, some readers may find them too complicated or time-consuming for everyday use—some seemingly simple dishes require cooks to preassemble multiple components. VERDICT Fans of Chang's restaurants will be happy to see recipes for signature dishes like ramen, pork buns, and bo ssäm (a ten-pound pork butt). Expect demand from foodies and readers interested in celebrity chefs or restaurateurs.—Lisa Campbell, Univ. of Pittsburgh Lib. Syst.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780307451958
  • Publisher: Crown Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 10/27/2009
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 60,828
  • Product dimensions: 8.20 (w) x 10.10 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

David Chang

DAVID CHANG is the chef and owner of Momofuku Noodle Bar, Momofuku Ssäm Bar, Momofuku Ko, and Momofuku Bakery & Milk Bar, all located in New York City's East Village. He has been named a Food & Wine Best New Chef, a GQ Man of the Year, a Rolling Stone Agent of Change, and a Bon Appétit Chef of the Year. He has taken home three James Beard Awards: Rising Star Chef, Best Chef New York City, and Best New Restaurant (Momofuku Ko). This is his first book.

PETER MEEHAN has written for the New York Times, Saveur, and Travel + Leisure and has collaborated on several books.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Momofuku


By David Chang

Clarkson Potter

Copyright © 2009 David Chang
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780307451958

Ginger Scallion Noodles

Our ginger scallion noodles are an homage to/out-and-out rip-off of one of the greatest dishes in New York City: the $4.95 plate of ginger scallion noodles at Great New York Noodletown down on the Bowery in Chinatown.

Ginger scallion sauce is one of the greatest sauces or condiments ever. Ever. It's definitely a mother sauce at Momofuku, something that we use over and over and over again. If you have ginger scallion sauce in the fridge, you will never go hungry: stir 6 tablespoons into a bowl of hot noodles—lo mein, rice noodles, Shanghai thick noodles—and you're in business. Or serve over a bowl of rice topped with a fried egg. Or with grilled meat or any kind of seafood. Or almost anything.

At Noodle Bar, we add a few vegetables to the Noodletown dish to appease the vegetarians, add a little sherry vinegar to the sauce to cut the fat, and leave off the squirt of hoisin sauce that Noodletown finishes the noodles with. (Not because it's a bad idea or anything, just that we've got hoisin in our pork buns, and too much hoisin in a meal can be too much of a good thing. Feel free to add it back.)

The dish goes something like this: boil 6 ounces of ramen noodles, drain, toss with 6 tablespoons Ginger Scallion Sauce (below); top the bowl with ¼ cup each of Bamboo Shoots; Quick-Pickled Cucumbers; pan-roasted cauliflower (a little oil in a hot wide pan, 8 or so minutes over high heat, stirring occasionally, until the florets are dotted with brown and tender all the way through; season with salt); a pile of sliced scallions; and a sheet of toasted nori. But that's because we've always got all that stuff on hand. Improvise to your needs, but know that you need ginger scallion sauce on your noodles, in your fridge, and in your life. For real.

ginger scallion sauce
makes about 3 cups

• 2 1/2 cups thinly sliced scallions (greens and whites; from 1 to
    2 large bunches)
• 1/2 cup finely minced peeled fresh ginger
• 1/4 cup grapeseed or other neutral oil
• 1 1/2 teaspoons usukuchi (light soy sauce)
• 3/4 teaspoon sherry vinegar
• 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt, or more to taste


Mix together the scallions, ginger, oil, soy, vinegar, and salt in a bowl. Taste and check for salt, adding more if needed. Though it's best after 15 or 20 minutes of sitting, ginger scallion sauce is good from the minute it's stirred together up to a day or two in the fridge. Use as directed, or apply as needed.

Continues...

Excerpted from Momofuku by David Chang Copyright © 2009 by David Chang. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Recipe

ginger scallion noodles

Our ginger scallion noodles are an homage to/out-and-out rip-off of one of the greatest dishes in New York City: the $4.95 plate of ginger scallion noodles at Great New York Noodletown down on the Bowery in Chinatown.
Ginger scallion sauce is one of the greatest sauces or condiments ever. Ever. It's definitely a mother sauce at Momofuku, something that we use over and over and over again. If you have ginger scallion sauce in the fridge, you will never go hungry: stir
6 tablespoons into a bowl of hot noodles-lo mein, rice noodles, Shanghai thick noodles-and you're in business. Or serve over a bowl of rice topped with a fried egg. Or with grilled meat or any kind of seafood. Or almost anything.
At Noodle Bar, we add a few vegetables to the Noodletown dish to appease the vegetarians, add a little sherry vinegar to the sauce to cut the fat, and leave off the squirt of hoisin sauce that Noodletown finishes the noodles with. (Not because it's a bad idea or anything, just that we've got hoisin in our pork buns, and too much hoisin in a meal can be too much of a good thing. Feel free to add it back.)
The dish goes something like this: boil 6 ounces of ramen noodles, drain, toss with 6 tablespoons Ginger Scallion Sauce (below); top the bowl with 1/4 cup each of Bamboo Shoots (page 54); Quick-Pickled Cucumbers (page 65); pan-roasted cauliflower (a little oil in a hot wide pan, 8 or so minutes over high heat, stirring occasionally, until the florets are dotted with brown and tender all the way through; season with salt); a pile of sliced scallions; and a sheet of toasted nori. But that's because we've always got all that stuff on hand. Improvise toyour needs, but know that you need ginger scallion sauce on your noodles, in your fridge, and in your life.
For real.

ginger scallion sauce
MAKES ABOUT 3 CUPS

21/2 cups thinly sliced scallions (greens and whites; from 1 to
2 large bunches)
1/2 cup finely minced peeled fresh ginger
1/4 cup grapeseed or other neutral oil
1 1/2 teaspoons usukuchi (light
soy sauce)
3/4 teaspoon sherry vinegar
3/4 teaspoon kosher salt, or more
to taste

Mix together the scallions, ginger, oil, soy, vinegar, and salt in a bowl. Taste and check for salt, adding more if needed. Though it's best after
15 or 20 minutes of sitting, ginger scallion sauce is good from the minute it's stirred together up to a day or two in the fridge. Use as directed, or apply as needed.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 38 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(15)

4 Star

(9)

3 Star

(6)

2 Star

(5)

1 Star

(3)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 38 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 17, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Reality Cooking

    The Korean American chef David Chang's cookbook, Momofuku, is not a typical cookbook. It talks about his struggles to open a restaurant in New York City, and contains lots of "F bombs" and recipes with exotic hard-to-find ingredients and time-demanding complex preparation. To the surprised (or even shocked) American readers, I would like to draw attention to deeper meaning of Mr. Chang's message.

    Modern consumers (in the West but also increasingly in affluent Asian countries) still cook a lot of meals themselves and enjoy the time in the kitchen. We use highly processed ingredients and follow recipes with a focus on simplicity and quickness. Other than deer hunters and vegetable gardeners, we live in a sanitized world detached from the food sources.

    Momofuku's language and demanding recipes force us to recognize that preparation for food can be a hard, hot, and grueling process, that restaurant is an "ugly, nasty business." This is exactly what every other cookbook wants to cover up. We eat animal corpses and eat plants alive. Reflection of this fact makes us uncomfortable. We want to avoid this reflection sitting at the dinner table. We much prefer thinking about how nice the Almighty is in creating these animals and plants for us as rulers of the world to enjoy. But here is the advantage of the Eastern way of realistic thinking about human nature, which could provide deep motivation for changing it.

    I have long wondered, as Mr. Chang does, why there is no pig head for sale in supermarkets. He includes the recipe for a pig's head torchon (a cylindrical pâté) with instructions to "grasp that fact" that "pigs have heads." You may have tasted pig tongues and ears. Let me assure you, the other parts of the pig's head are just as delicious, with different flavors and textures. And by the way, the cheek muscle is one of the most tasteful parts of a fish. Read on at www.2cobe.com

    8 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 23, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    David Chang:Up Close, Personal & the Recipes!

    I bought this book for my husband, a chef (we own & operate a restaurant ourselves) because we were hoping to repeat the magic that David Chang creates in his unique restaurants. If you don't live in NYC or don't read the food critics, you might not know about David Chang. He has won countless awards for his creativity & innovation. He's been featured in countless food shows & magazines. But perhaps the greatest accolades come from the NYC chefs who flock to his restaurant after they finish their shifts. His food is sublime,simply delicious & totally satisfying! We savored his Pork Buns, among other treats, when we were in NY last year & we wondered how he did it. How great to find a cookbook to let us in on the secrets! My husband just made David's Pork Belly... the buns are yet to be created since we live in Vermont & don't have a local Asian purveyor but the pork is so wonderful! It's been rendered so that a lot of the fat is gone & only the wonderful flavor remains...similar to duck confit...it's like bacon confit. I can't tell you how fantastic it is! I'm not a cook but I thank my stars for marrying one...but I do believe these recipes are possible for most food-loving people. The book itself is full of anecdotes, fantastic photos & easy instructions about how to do things. I love a cookbook with photos because they make me want to have that item & this book is so full of mouth-watering photos that you come away drooling. It's also a book for people in the restaurant business because David discusses the the work of feeding his customers & the process of creating & building his restaurants...the ideas, ideals, menus, glitches, etc. It's a great read even if you're not a cook.AND the photos will leave you salivating. I feel fortunate to have tasted David Chang's food at his Noodle Bar & Ssam Bar because it has given us the desire to re-create his magic here in Vermont. Buy this book! It will inspire you!

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 13, 2010

    Makes me want to eat noodles

    This book is seriously inspiring. Not just a compendium of great recipes, but also a very entertaining read on the history of Chang's business. Reading it made my mouth water and made me want to eat more noodles.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 12, 2010

    Definitely not just a cookbook!

    Not only does this contain very detailed recipes of some of my favorite dishes from the Momofuku empire, but it is also a behind-the-scenes look of the stories behind the venues in which they are served.
    David Chang's rise to become one of the hottest new chefs on the scene is told in a gritty, honest and raw account. This book is both incredibly entertaining and informative. It is amazing how long the prep times are on many of his dishes, and some of the ingredients may be a little bit of a hassle to obtain- but it is all worth it. I would not recommend this for the beginner cook, but for those who are intermediates, or interested in challenging themselves, the result can be quite satisfying.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 13, 2010

    Fun; tasty

    Interesting and fun to read, and the recipes I've tried are great. Some ingredients can be hard to find. Lots of cursing, so be warned.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2010

    Fun food porn

    Insight into his creativity. Great food porn.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 28, 2009

    Great!

    I found Momofuku cookbook to be an interesting read. David Chang shares his wisdom and experience on creating great exciting foods! I gave it as a gift to several foodie people this christmas in hopes they will enjoy it as much as I have!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 1, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 14, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 17, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 22, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 38 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)