Naked Lunch: The Restored Text / Edition 1

Naked Lunch: The Restored Text / Edition 1

3.3 65
by William S. Burroughs
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0802140181

ISBN-13: 2900802140189

Pub. Date: 01/15/2003

Publisher: Grove/Atlantic, Inc.

Naked Lunch is one of the most important novels of the twentieth century, a book that redefined not just literature but American culture. An unnerving tale of a narcotics addict unmoored in New York, Tangiers, and ultimately a nightmarish wasteland known as Interzone, its formal innovation, formerly taboo subject matter, and tour de force execution have exerted their

Overview

Naked Lunch is one of the most important novels of the twentieth century, a book that redefined not just literature but American culture. An unnerving tale of a narcotics addict unmoored in New York, Tangiers, and ultimately a nightmarish wasteland known as Interzone, its formal innovation, formerly taboo subject matter, and tour de force execution have exerted their influence on the work of authors like Thomas Pynchon, J. G. Ballard, and William Gibson; on the relationship of art and obscenity; and on the shape of music, film, and media generally. Naked Lunch: The Restored Text includes many editorial corrections to errors present in previous editions, and incorporates Burroughs's notes on the text, several essays he wrote over the years about the book, and an appendix of 20 percent new material and alternate drafts from the original manuscript, which predates the first published version. For the Burroughs enthusiast and the neophyte, this volume is a valuable and fresh experience of this classic of our culture.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2900802140189
Publisher:
Grove/Atlantic, Inc.
Publication date:
01/15/2003
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
304

Table of Contents

Naked Lunch1
And Start West3
The Vigilante8
The Rube9
Benway19
Joselito39
The Black Meat43
Hospital47
Lazarus Go Home58
Hassan's Rumpus Room62
Campus of Interzone University70
A.J.'s Annual Party74
Meeting of International Conference of Technological Psychiatry87
The Market89
Ordinary Men and Women101
Islam Incorporated and the Parties of Interzone121
The County Clerk141
Interzone148
The Examination155
Have You Seen Pantopon Rose?165
Coke Bugs166
The Exterminator Does a Good Job169
The Algebra of Need172
Hauser and O'Brien174
Atrophied Preface182
Quick ...195
Original Introductions and Additions by the Author197
Deposition: Testimony Concerning a Sickness [1960]199
Post Script ... Wouldn't You? [1960]207
Afterthoughts on a Deposition [1991]211
Letter from a Master Addict to Dangerous Drugs [1956]213
Burroughs Texts Annexed by the Editors231
Editors' Note233
Letter to Irving Rosenthal [1960]249
The Death of Mel the Waiter [undated]252
Outtakes: The Vigilante254
Outtakes: The Rube257
Outtakes: Benway264
Outtakes: The Black Meat266
Outtakes: Hospital269
Outtakes: A.J.'s Annual Party270
Outtakes: Islam Incorporated and the Parties of Interzone272
Outtakes: The Examination272
Outtakes: Coke Bugs279
Outtakes: Hauser and O'Brien281
Outtakes: Atrophied Preface282

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Naked Lunch 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 65 reviews.
FocoProject More than 1 year ago
Forget you ever read a book in your life. All the standards and rules and everything you have read up to this point, just toss it out the window because it will do you absolutely no good when reading this book. In fact, it will probably be detrimental. This is probably the most difficult book I have ever read. Literally. I sat down and read five pages. I put the book down and realized I had no idea what was going on. Sure that I must have missed something, I went back and read again. About twelve pages in, I again realized I was not getting it. Frustrated I put it away.

I started the book from the beginning three days later. I got to the part where I kept stopping and realized, there is no way I am going to force this book to make sense. So I had to shift a little, and make myself give in to the book instead, which for me is relatively uncomfortable. And yet, only in that manner was I able to sink into this hellish book.

If I were to describe this book in one line, it would include the words trip, crazy, troubling and edgy accompanied by a handful of expletives scattered around for good measure.

Once you give in to the book, prepare yourself to go on one of the most disturbing, surrealistic, humorous, perverted, unbelievable rides of your life. Take ¿Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas¿ and multiply it times four.

As a point of warning, this book is NOT for the average reader. It demands an open mind, because it deals with drugs, alcohol, substance abuse, sexuality, homosexuality and science fiction in very explicit ways. VERY. Though not overtly descriptive in a lot of cases, this book does have some scenes that will make the tamer side of the crowd cringe. It is not every day that an author describes a characters fright, by picturing him pissing and defecating all over himself. It is not every day that an author tells the story about a man that teaches his bonghole to talk. It does not make sense, it is not supposed to. The world that this author describes, which is at times in Mexico, Tangiers and the Interzone, is one that can not really be described as anything other than one massive sex, drug and violence trip.

Furthermore, sentences come at you broken and the story jumps from one scene to the next without following any rational thought. It is no secret that a lot of this was written while the author was under the influence and it shows. At times disgusting, twisted and at other times incredibly humorous, this book is going to test all literary conventions.

Armed with a collection of memorable characters such as junkies that believe themselves to be secret agents, or unscrupulous doctors that have absolutely no ethics¿this explosive book, is like a bullet, hard hitting and unforgiving. It will likely offend most readers in one way or another. But if you can find it within yourself to take yourself a bit more lightly, you may just enjoy it.

Maybe.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I can honestly say that until today I had never read a book that has made me gag, laugh, and cringe in pain uncontrollably over and over again. No one who is at all narrow minded will enjoy the book as well as most who consider themselves open minded. Let me say that I think just about every review I have read is exaggerating in one extreme or another. This is not trash that should be burned and never read by anyone. But it is also not a masterpiece, and obviously some people read way to much into it. The book definitely has a message (although it is hard to find) and it is new, fresh, and challenging. The book is no doubt extremely important and to a degree revolutionary but to say that it changed American culture is definitely a stretch.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is not for the faint of heart. It is not one those happy books that you can read before you go to bed. It is a dark journey through addiction and madness. It is a brilliant book that can never be replicated. It is a must read. It is a must own.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Wonderful weird flake consistancy world half-life stillness. This book is like no other. The sentences are disjointed and the words are jumbled--all on purpose to give you the feel of a heroin addict taking notes. And it works. A book that changed the course of literature. Parts are extremely disturbing. Parts are beautiful. Take the journey.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
For my English Assignment I had to read a book and write review about it, I chose Naked Lunch the Restored Text. I have to agree it redefine American Culture, the book addicts you like William S. Burroughs was addicted to narcotics. He had written down mostly everything he had gone through while on the influence of drugs.  It made me go to a totally different world, at some points I didn’t know whether I should laugh or scream. Don’t get me wrong it is a good thing because in a world of happiness you’re always going to need pain.  This has to be one of my favorite books. I really enjoy sort of the side notes (if that’s what you call them) in text. The reason I read was because it was in the banned book list and I am rebel.  It was probably banned for every conceivable way a book should be banned, but who really cares.  If I were to recommend this to anyone it has to be to the people that are very open-minded or it won’t really make any sense to you. It is also difficult to read but once you get it, its genius.  
malignant_madness More than 1 year ago
I'll admit, Naked Lunch (as well as Junky and the rest of Burroughs' books) are NOT for everybody. In my opinion you either love his work or you hate it. I am one of those who love him and can't get enough of his writng. I've already reccomended this book many times over the years and still reread it a few times a year.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very hard to follow, even when you got the 60's refrences. There was a laugh or two between completely incomprehensible paragraphs. I wanted to like it, but couldn't.
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Maria73 More than 1 year ago
This is not the first work by Burroughs that I've read but it is the worst. The text flows through nonsensical chaos that will leave you scratching your head or staring at the page questioning what you just read. The language is graphic, confusing and deals heavily with the darkest sides of substance abuse. His descriptions of the characters, their drug use and sexuality are disturbing. This is not for the faint of heart nor is it for anyone who'd like to read an even remotely coherent book.
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Analogkid60 More than 1 year ago
Apparently written under the influence at a time when drug use was still underground. I just didn’t get it. For the life of me I could not make any sense out of this book. The only parts that were coherent were the essays at the end. It was like 196 pages of Jim Morrison poetry. There’s no discernable plot. Burroughs apparently wrote down every sick, obscene, filthy thought that ran through his drug addled mind. Some parts seem like they were nothing more than random phrases thrown together. I’m certainly no prude; I inhaled, and I have nothing against books that use profanity or describe sexual situations, but Burroughs uses obscenity just for the sake of shock. I had to resign myself to reading 10 pages a day just to get through it. The only reason I didn’t give up altogether was because I believe in finishing any book that I begin. Maybe you need hard drugs to enjoy this book. Perhaps Naked Lunch could be used in the anti-drug campaign as an example of how the mind disintegrates with prolonged drug usage, although I wouldn’t recommend anyone under the age of 16 read this. Unless you enjoy unintelligible mayhem, do yourself a favor and read something else.
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As a pioneer of the beat generation authors, such as Kerouac and Ginsberg, I had wanted for years to see what insight Burroughs shared in his seminal work. Unfortunately this is just the addled ramblings of a drug fried brain. The major accomplishment seems to be that he got it onto the page.