×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Public Enemies: America's Greatest Crime Wave and the Birth of the FBI, 1933-34
     

Public Enemies: America's Greatest Crime Wave and the Birth of the FBI, 1933-34

4.1 55
by Bryan Burrough
 

See All Formats & Editions

ISBN-10: 0143115863

ISBN-13: 2900143115860

Pub. Date: 04/29/2009

Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group

Burrough (a special correspondent for Vanity Fair) examines the stories of John Dillinger, Baby Face Nelson, Pretty Boy Floyd, the Barker-Karpis Gang, Machine Gun Kelly, and Bonnie and Clyde as a single narrative history of the FBI's "War on Crime" from 1933 to 1936. His examination of the recently release FBI files reveals a story vastly different from the largely

Overview

Burrough (a special correspondent for Vanity Fair) examines the stories of John Dillinger, Baby Face Nelson, Pretty Boy Floyd, the Barker-Karpis Gang, Machine Gun Kelly, and Bonnie and Clyde as a single narrative history of the FBI's "War on Crime" from 1933 to 1936. His examination of the recently release FBI files reveals a story vastly different from the largely mythical narrative promoted by J. Edgar Hoover or the romantic portrayals of the gangs by Hollywood. For Burrough, the story is about the bureaucratic evolution of the FBI from a bungling group of amateurs to a professional crime-fighting organization and his central aim is to reclaim the history for the individual agents involved. Annotation ©2004 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2900143115860
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
04/29/2009
Edition description:
Movie Tie-In
Pages:
624

Table of Contents

Author's Notexi
Cast of Charactersxv
Prologue1
1A Prelude to War, Spring 19335
2A Massacre by Persons Unknown, June 8 to June 15, 193319
3The College Boys Take the Field, June 17 to July 22, 193351
4The Baying of the Hounds, July 22 to August 25, 193371
5The Kid Jimmy, August 18 to September 25, 193398
6The Streets of Chicago, October 12 to November 20, 1933135
7Ambushes, November 20 to December 31, 1933162
8"An Attack on All We Hold Dear," January 2 to January 28, 1934183
9A Star Is Born, January 30 to March 2, 1934206
10Dillinger and Nelson, March 3 to March 29, 1934234
11Crescendo, March 30 to April 10, 1934267
12Death in the North Woods, April 10 to April 23, 1934292
13"And It's Death for Bonnie and Clyde," April 23 to May 23, 1934323
14New Faces, May 24 to June 30, 1934362
15The Woman in Orange, July 1 to July 27, 1934388
16The Scramble, July 23 to September 12, 1934417
17A Field in Ohio and a Highway in Illinois, September 18 to November 27, 1934446
18The Last Man Standing, December 3, 1934, to January 20, 1935484
19Pas de Deux, January 1935 Until...515
Epilogue543
Bibliographical Essay553
Notes556
Selected Bibliography567
Acknowledgments571
Index573

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Public Enemies: America's Greatest Crime Wave and the Birth of the FBI, 1933-34 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 55 reviews.
paintlady1 More than 1 year ago
difficult for me to read because the author kept bouncing from one "public enemy" to another just to keep the presentation in "date order"...i think that the information would have been much better presented without trying to maintain a time-line of events...he did a lot of research.and included copious footnotes and a comprehensive bibliography, but he lacks the ability to put this research into a good "story"...there are no heros in this book...the criminals are evil and the g-men inept and bumbling...there are better books on this subject
shawn164 More than 1 year ago
this book is a very good book, it is very informational. when i read it i wanna keep reading it more and more. this book has alot of good action and lots of killing and shoot outs. i would recamend this book to any teenager and adults that likes history in the 1930's
55T-Bird More than 1 year ago
Fascinating!  Action, intrigue, drama and suspense-- this book recounts some really wild years in the world of crime and law enforcement.  All the well-known depression-era outlaws are included in this book: Dillinger, Baby Face Nelson, Machine Gun Kelly, the Bakers, Bonnie and Clyde, and more. Bryan Burrough weaves together their concurrent stories from start to finish, all the way until the last one is dead, captured or otherwise incapacitated.  One warning: the abundance of names (G-men and gangsters alike), places and events can get very confusing.  I read the digital version and made lots of notations and highlights for referencing while reading.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good read for a history buff. Very well researched and very accurate. Some historical aspects were honestly presented as speculative.
Guest More than 1 year ago
My father, Tom McDade, was an FBI agent in the 30's and until I read Bryan Burrough's book I had no idea the life he and his fellow agents led. I now understand why my father and his fellow agents rarely revealed their experiences to family or friends. But now we have 'Public Enemies' to tell us in magnificent detail not only the exploits of John Dillinger, Baby Face Nelson, and the rest of the public enimies of the 1930's, but the often fateful experiences of their apprehenders. Often I have read the one-sided accounts from either the pursuers point of view or the pursued but this book covers both sides with fascinating details. My father would have praised this book(he died in 1996 - the last of the Dillinger Squad)as being completely straight-forward and revealing the both strengths and weaknesses of the criminals and the law.
Anonymous 6 months ago
This book is horrid
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I couldn't finish this book. Usually I will finish books even if I absolutely dislike them but not this one. Jumps around too much and is pretty bland.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Mahjarunner More than 1 year ago
This book has a little bit of everything - history, gangsters, and growth of the FBI. The author clearly loved his subject and it was a pleasure to read the book. I would have liked a little more on the gangsters and a little less on J. Edgar Hoover, but overall, it was a good investment of time.
glauver More than 1 year ago
Burrough returns the reader to an era when hard men on both sides of the law neither gave nor asked quarter. Some of the scenes would easily fit into one of Dashiell Hammett's Continental Op stories. You can feel the fear and adrenaline surge as criminals plan and execute a heist, agents and police surround an out of the way house and wait for their well-armed quarry to show, or a wounded man draws his last few breaths before dying.I sometimes wondered about the authenticity of all the dialogue Burrough quotes, although he claims it comes from FBI files. Other than that small caveat, this is a gripping read that fairly presents both sides of the story and shows how J. Edgar hoover used the Depression crime epidemic to build a national police force and establish himself as a indispensable crime fighter.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago