Sylvie

Sylvie

4.2 5
by Jennifer Sattler
     
 

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Meet a flamingo of a different stripe!

“Mama, why are we pink?” asks an ever-curious young flamingo named Sylvie. Like Leo Lionni’s chameleon in A Color of His Own, Sylvie comes to learn that being yourself is the best thing to be. When she learns that it’s due to the little pink brine shrimp they eat, Sylvie

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Overview

Meet a flamingo of a different stripe!

“Mama, why are we pink?” asks an ever-curious young flamingo named Sylvie. Like Leo Lionni’s chameleon in A Color of His Own, Sylvie comes to learn that being yourself is the best thing to be. When she learns that it’s due to the little pink brine shrimp they eat, Sylvie takes the maxim “You are what you eat!” to a whole new level. Her new diet leads to some very interesting new looks—from scarlet to stripey to positively purple!

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
A curious young flamingo named Sylvie, who wonders why she is pink, is told by her mother that it is because she eats pink shrimp. Sylvie tries nibbling palm leaves to find herself turning green, while grapes turn her "positively purple." She moves on to chocolate, blue sky from a painting, and a bite from a red kite. Finding these changes fun, Sylvie puts on herself the stripes from a towel, the flowers chewed from a hat, and the paisley from a bathing suit, but her poor tummy begins objecting to these nibbles, as she turns multicolored. Looking at herself and her family, Sylvie decides to go back to pink shrimps and be herself, with just an amusing aside at the end. Although her family members are pictured naturalistically, perky Sylvie is a fiction: all legs, neck, and global head with rather large beak, happy-go-lucky, smiling, clearly designed for comedy. Full-page illustrations have mostly muted backgrounds, making fine contrasts for the star's poses. The beach scenes, complete with human bathers and palm trees, add to the comedy. The double-page spread of eight vignettes depicting Sylvie's reactions to her overeating is almost a comic dance sequence. Check the contrasting front and back end pages. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 2

"Why are we pink?" a young flamingo asks her mother. When she learns that her coloration is a result of the shrimp she eats, Sylvie gets an idea to experiment with what she consumes. Ice cream, kites, bathing suits-nothing is off-limits for the adventurous bird. Sure enough, she turns brown, looking "yummy in chocolate," and "rather stripy" after eating a towel. Kids familiar with a certain hungry caterpillar may see what's coming-Sylvie gets a stomachache. It's only when she rejoins her flock and resumes her diet of shrimp that she feels better, though there is a surprise ending that will surely induce giggles from kids. Sattler's art steals the show; the colors are eye-popping and vibrant, right to the swirling bright endpapers. As Sylvie changes colors the background changes hues as well. This title is sure to create storytime magic, especially when paired with Jeremy Tankard's Grumpy Bird (Scholastic, 2007).-Laura Lutz, Queens Borough Public Library, NY

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780449810729
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
04/23/2013
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
326,022
Product dimensions:
7.30(w) x 10.70(h) x 0.20(d)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Jennifer Sattler’s expressive watercolors bring Sylvie and her sunny environment and creative outlook to life. This is Jennifer’s first picture book for Random House Children’s Books. She has taught painting and drawing and exhibited extensively, winning an NEA grant in 1996. She is now a full-time mom living in Greenfield, New York.

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