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The Hobgoblin Proxy
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The Hobgoblin Proxy

5.0 1
by J. T. Petty, Will Davis (Illustrator)
 

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If you're looking for a quest, help me find the changeling, destroy it, and save the Make-Believe and this halfling's sanity.

As a baby, Kenneth Mess was stolen from his cradle and replaced with a clay replica. Now he is being raised underground by Clemency Pogue's hobgoblin friend Chaphesmeeso, so that he will eventually become a hobgoblin

Overview

If you're looking for a quest, help me find the changeling, destroy it, and save the Make-Believe and this halfling's sanity.

As a baby, Kenneth Mess was stolen from his cradle and replaced with a clay replica. Now he is being raised underground by Clemency Pogue's hobgoblin friend Chaphesmeeso, so that he will eventually become a hobgoblin himself. But that can't happen until the clay baby dissolves. And that won't happen, since Inky, the changeling, rarely washes. Which means that the world of Make-Believe is in serious danger.

Once again, an adventure is underfoot for Clemency Pogue as she tries to make the world safe for Make-Believe.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 4-6-In this sequel to Clemency Pogue: Fairy Killer (S & S, 2005), the young human is asked by her friend and hobgoblin, Chaphesmeeso, for help on a quest-to find the changeling of a human boy, Kennethurchin. He was stolen as a baby by goblins and a clay-baby was put in his place, but instead of dissolving as these babies usually do, the infant kept developing, and could destroy both the world of Make-Believe and Kennethurchin (who is in training to become a hobgoblin). If this sounds complicated, imagine the addition of a pointless subplot involving a box of bobbed boxer-dogs' tails, a nasty Fairy of Long Goodnights, and a tale of sibling rivalry. The self-consciously glib language doesn't make this tale any more enjoyable or easy to understand. The size of the book is deceptively small and the cover is appealing, but younger kids will feel swamped by the convoluted prose and odd plot, and older readers would probably prefer Eoin Colfer's "Artemis Fowl" series (Hyperion).-Eva Mitnick, Los Angeles Public Library Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
This sharp and witty second installment in Petty's series quickly and efficiently brings readers up to speed on Clemency's continuing role in saving the fantastical and vividly drawn world of Make-Believe. Clemency, the intelligent and plucky heroine, partners with Chaphesmeeso, a friendly hobgoblin, and Kennethurchin, a fledgling hobgoblin, to search for Kennethurchin's changeling, Inky, who is his key to full hobgoblin status. However, having lived nine years as a boy, Inky has other ideas, which could spell disaster for Kennethurchin and Make-Believe. Although on Make-Believe's side, Clemency struggles with the idea that ultimately finding Inky means his death and she hatches an alternate plan, executed, but not completely wrapped up, making a tantalizing cliffhanger for the series' third volume. Though a slim text featuring sporadic black-and-white sketches and approachable vocabulary looks younger, heavy topics of mental illness, abandonment and Inky's impending death suit this creative tale for mature readers. (Fiction. 9-12)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781416907688
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers
Publication date:
05/23/2006
Series:
Clemency Pogue Series , #2
Pages:
160
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 7.20(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Read an Excerpt

The Hobgoblin Proxy


By JT Petty

Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing

Copyright © 2006 JT Petty
All right reserved.

ISBN: 1416907688

Prologue

All children grow, but not always up, and not always older.

Gilbert Mess grew big before he grew up. He was quicker and larger than any of his classmates, stronger even than some of his teachers; the only thing that topped him was a confusion of red hair eerily similar to the cross-hatching of the red rubber ball in his hands. Gilbert had been elected captain of one of the day's kick-ball teams. As he chose his players, Gilbert's eyes kept reluctantly returning to his little brother, Inky.

"Martha . . . Reed . . . Laura . . . Kyle . . . Kathryn . . . David . . . I'll take . . . what's-his-name, the kid with one leg. . . ." The names were called, and kick-ball players ran (or hopped) to join their sides, leaving Inky closer and closer to being all alone.

Inky had a head shaped like a chestnut and the look of a frog prince about him -- a confidence that his days being tiny and slimy were few. It was a confidence confounding to the other children, for Inky was slow and weak, despicably smart, his kicking foot misshapen and inward turning, his face splotched with a birthmark that looked like an army of squid.

The other children could tell, just bylooking at him, that there was a piece missing. He was the only kid anybody knew who could consistently strike out at the game of kick ball. Nobody wanted Inky as a teammate, not even his own older brother. Any other child would have cried, but Inky was very nearly all dried out.

As the players took their sides, and the line of kick-ball candidates shrank toward Inky alone, he realized that his brother Gilbert would choose him, not because he wanted him, but because he was the only one left.

All children grow, but Inky Mess was going to grow into something entirely different.

Copyright ©2006 by JT Petty



Continues...


Excerpted from The Hobgoblin Proxy by JT Petty Copyright © 2006 by JT Petty. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Meet the Author

JT Petty is the author of Clemency Pogue: Fairy Killer and The Squampkin Patch: A Nasselrogt Adventure. He is also a director and screenwriter for movies and video games. His film Soft for Digging was an Official Selection of the Sundance Film Festival. He received a Game Developers Choice Award for his work on the bestselling video game Splinter Cell. JT lives in Brooklyn, New York. Visit his Web site at www.pettyofficial.com.

Will Davis has an animation background, with experience working as a storyboard artist on television shows and commercials. He also illustrated Clemency Pogue: Fairy Killer. Will lives in Pensacola, Florida.

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The Hobgoblin Proxy 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Tanktisocial More than 1 year ago
It was a very magical book with very colorful language! It was funny and very cute =^-^=