The Lost Ones (Quinn Colson Series #2)

The Lost Ones (Quinn Colson Series #2)

3.9 16
by Ace Atkins
     
 

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Fans of Justified and James Lee Burke will love Mississippi lawman Quinn Colson in this Edgar(R) Award Nominee for Best Novel from the author of The Ranger...

When Army Ranger Quinn Colson, the new sheriff of Tibbehah County, is called out to investigate a child abuse case, what he finds is a horrifying scene of neglect,

Overview

Fans of Justified and James Lee Burke will love Mississippi lawman Quinn Colson in this Edgar(R) Award Nominee for Best Novel from the author of The Ranger...

When Army Ranger Quinn Colson, the new sheriff of Tibbehah County, is called out to investigate a child abuse case, what he finds is a horrifying scene of neglect, thirteen empty cribs, and a shoe box full of money. Janet and Ramon Torres seem to have skipped town—but Colson’s sure they’ll come back for the cash.

Meanwhile, Colson’s sister has returned—clean and sober for good, she says. His friend Boom has been drinking himself into oblivion and picking fights at the local bar. And his old flame is pregnant. But Colson can’t focus on his personal problems. He and Deputy Lillie Virgil are convinced that Janet and Ramon have a taste for guns, drugs, and human trafficking. Soon Colson and Virgil find a link between the fugitive couple and a drug cartel that controls most of the Texas border, taking their investigation far beyond the rough hills of northeast Mississippi…

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“One of the best crime writers at work today.”—Michael Connelly

“A series that should push him to the top of the bestseller list.”—John Sandford

“Keep an eye on Ace Atkins, he can write rings around most of the names in the crime field.”—Elmore Leonard

 “[His] estimable range may bring to mind Lee Child’s hardfisted, softhearted Jack Reacher, which is entirely a good thing.”—Kirkus Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
Atkins' sequel to The Ranger (2011) finds Quinn Colson counting the ways in which his Afghanistan tours resemble life in the nice little Mississippi town that's just elected him sheriff. Begin with the complicated matter of identifying "friendlies." What with turf wars and hidden agendas, not all law enforcement people march in lock step, Quinn discovers. Long legs, pretty red hair and an FBI power suit, for instance, do not, for sure, an ally make. They can signal one thing, then its opposite, and sometimes both simultaneously--mixed signals with the potential for dangerous, even deadly confusion. Along those same lines, an old pal with whom Quinn once happily tormented the juvenile authorities of Tibbehah County, Miss., now travels a crooked path to nowhere and can no longer be trusted. On the other hand, it's a good bet that even Afghanistan might never be able to duplicate the homegrown nastiness of Johnny Stagg, the bottom feeder Quinn replaced as sheriff, and about whom the usually even-tempered, essence-of-cool Quinn is heard to say, "I'd like to punch Johnny Stagg in the throat." Whether the business is dismal enough--and profitable enough--depends on ex-sheriff Stagg being somehow near the core of it. And suddenly Tibbehah County is rife with dismal profitable opportunities. There's gunrunning activity involving bloodthirsty Mexican cartels, a thriving cottage industry in baby-selling, and more, all of which keeps Sheriff Quinn stepping briskly to keep up. Add to this a full familial plate: His wayward kid sister has unexpectedly returned. To reclaim the little boy she left in Quinn's charge? Good, hard-to-answer question. So, with his own agenda piled high and spilling over every which way, it's entirely possible that from time to time Quinn might ask himself if Afghanistan was…well…quite as singular as he'd thought. A valiant hero to root for, a vividly rendered small-town setting, lots of expertly managed violence: another crowd-pleaser from a thriller-meister at the top of his game.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780425258644
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
12/04/2012
Series:
Quinn Colson Series, #2
Pages:
368
Sales rank:
72,608
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.20(h) x 1.00(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

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What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
“One of the best crime writers at work today.”—Michael Connelly

“A series that should push him to the top of the bestseller list.”—John Sandford
“Keep an eye on Ace Atkins, he can write rings around most of the names in the crime field.”—Elmore Leonard

“[His] estimable range may bring to mind Lee Child’s hardfisted, softhearted Jack Reacher, which is entirely a good thing.”—Kirkus Reviews

Meet the Author

Ace Atkins, a former journalist, has written eight previous novels. He began his writing career in 1998, at age twenty-eight, when the first of four Nick Travers novels was published. In 2001, he earned a Pulitzer Prize nomination for his investigation into a 1950s murder. That murder inspired his 2006 novel White Shadow, which was followed by three further history-based crime novels, Wicked City, Devil’s Garden, and Infamous. His Quinn Colson novels include The Ranger, The Lost Ones, and The Broken Places. Atkins lives in Oxford, Mississippi.

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The Lost Ones 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
Twink More than 1 year ago
I first 'discovered' Ace Atkins with last year's release of The Ranger - the first book featuring Quinn Colson. I loved it and have been eagerly awaiting the next in this series. The Lost Ones is newly released and is just as good (or better) as the first one! After ten years as an Army Ranger, Quinn Colson returned to his home town of Jericho in Tibbehah County, Mississippi. He's now the new sheriff in town. When a local doctor calls him about a child brought in with a head injury, Quinn and his chief deputy Lillie Virgil head out to investigate. What they find is an empty, filthy house. It looks like the residents were running a puppy mill...and a baby trafficking outfit. Donnie Varner, an old friend of Quinn, is doing his own trafficking as well - in guns. As Quinn and Lillie investigate, it looks like the two cases might have something - or someone - in common. Atkins draws his characters so well. I have a firm picture in my mind of Quinn - a tough, loyal, cagey lawman who knows his county well. And umm, did I mention he's kind of (okay a lot) sexy too. Kind of that holdin' out for a hero vibe. Lillie is firmly planted in my mind as well - she's a female version of Quinn, although we see some vulnerability this time round. We also get to know some of Quinn's back story with flashbacks to his younger days with his sister Caddy. The supporting cast is equally well drawn, with one-armed Boom standing out for me. In fact I found myself rooting for one of the 'bad guys', hoping he would get a break. The dialogue really fleshs out the mental pictures I've created. A lot of it is short and snappy, and quite humourous at times. Anything more involved would detract from the atmosphere Atkins has created. The setting is just as much of a character. Stark and gritty, Atkins brings to life a county beset by poverty, abuse and corruption. The plotting is excellent, zigging just when I thought it would zag. Lots and lots of action, kept me frantically turning pages until I finished the book far too quickly. So pull up a rocker, grab a glass of sweet tea, put your feet up on the railing and be prepared to set a spell. It's a hell of a read - one you won't want to put down. Fans of television's Justified and Raylan Givens would enjoy this character, as would Jack Reacher fans.
Man_Of_La_Book_Dot_Com More than 1 year ago
The Lost Ones by Ace Atkins is a novel tak­ing place in the fic­tional Tibbe­hah County, Mis­sis­sippi. This is the sec­ond bookin “The Ranger” series, which was also the name of the first book. Quinn Colo­son resigned from the Army Rangers to become Sher­iff of Tibbe­hah County, Mis­sis­sippi, his uncle’s old job. A Mex­i­can car­tel is seemed to be get­ting guns from a gun store his friend owns and at the same time an abused child case sends the sher­iff and his deputy to dis­cover a child boot­leg ring. The Lost Ones by Ace Atkins returns famil­iar and new char­ac­ters in the series. Quinn Col­son, a for­mer Army Ranger, his fam­ily, friends and neme­sis. Ace Atkins, in my opin­ion, is one of the best and active Amer­i­cana writ­ers. I have read sev­eral of his his­tor­i­cal fic­tion books (many set in the 1920s) and enjoyed them tremen­dously. Mr. Atkins’ foray into fic­tion proved to me that he is a capa­ble writer and is here for the long haul. The author has an uncanny abil­ity to paint a pic­ture with few words. It’s amaz­ing that he describes a scene or a per­son with just the right amount of ver­biage let­ting the reader do most of the work accord­ing to their understanding. Atkins draws county where “new in town” means you’ve been there for only ten years, Sonic is the go to place to get a meal and you still think of girls you knew with their maiden name attached. There is a lot going on in this book, Mex­i­can drug gangs, child abuse, baby rack­e­teer­ing, fam­ily drama and small town cor­rup­tion yet the book moves along slowly, well paced let­ting the reader take in the mul­ti­ple sto­ry­lines as if strolling in the park on a lazy sum­mer day. The char­ac­ter of Quinn Col­son is bound to become a phe­nom­ena in pop-culture much like Jack Reacher or Cot­ton Mal­one. I can see a fan based built around this char­ac­ter who is a peace­ful war­rior who has many issues most of us have. Mex­i­can drug gangs are just as big an issue as a dis­turbed sis­ter or an Army buddy who needs a job. That is how life is, there are no small prob­lems – it’s all personal. While I never vis­ited the Deep South, this novel was still a plea­sure to read. Mr. Atkins has a way of por­tray­ing his char­ac­ters in a believ­able, mov­ing man­ner. The sto­ries take on a life of their own with the excel­lent dia­log and char­ac­ters’ moti­va­tions while the sus­pense and implied vio­lence kept me at the edge of my seat.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good read.
akrosie More than 1 year ago
I totally wasted my money on this book. The plot was good but the language and innuendo's were over the top. I read halfway through the book and put it down. Such a disappointment!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I had to put this book down after about 75 pages. I really had no attachment to any of the characters and the plot moved too slowly--probably gave it more time than it deserved.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great small town Southern setting and characters - a good read!
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hello. Can I help.