The Spymasters (Men at War Series #7)

The Spymasters (Men at War Series #7)

3.4 57
by W. E. B. Griffin, William E. Butterworth
     
 

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#1 Wall Street Journal and New York Times bestselling author W.E.B. Griffin continues his gripping series featuring the legendary OSS—fighting a silent war of spies and assassins in the shadows of World War II.
 
Summer 1943. Two of the Allies’ most important plans for winning World War II are at grave risk

Overview

#1 Wall Street Journal and New York Times bestselling author W.E.B. Griffin continues his gripping series featuring the legendary OSS—fighting a silent war of spies and assassins in the shadows of World War II.
 
Summer 1943. Two of the Allies’ most important plans for winning World War II are at grave risk—the coming D-Day invasion and the Manhattan Project’s race to build the atomic bomb.
 
OSS spy chief William “Wild Bill” Donovan turns to his top agent, Dick Canidy, and his team. They’ve certainly got their work cut out for them. In the weeks to come, they must fight not only the enemy in the field—and figure out how to sabotage Germany’s new “aerial torpedo” rockets—but also the enemy within.
 
Someone is feeding Manhattan Project secrets to the Soviets. And if the Soviets build their own atomic bomb, winning the war might only lead to another, even more terrible conflict…

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“A storyteller in the grand tradition.”—Tom Clancy

“The poet laureate of the American military.”—Los Angeles Daily News

“You can almost taste the gin and tonic as FDR and OSS chief William ‘Wild Bill’ Donovan meet on the presidential yacht Sequoia to discuss plans for winning the war.”—Publishers Weekly

Publishers Weekly
Bestseller Griffin’s solid seventh Men at War novel (after 2007’s The Double Agents), the third in collaboration with son Butterworth, finds top OSS agent Maj. Richard Caniday involved in both a mission to keep Ike’s imminent plan to invade Sicily a secret and an attempt to sabotage the Nazi V-1 and V-2 program. Goebbels has broadcast that the “aerial torpedo” attacks will first target London, starting in December 1943. To make the situation even more ominous, the Germans are planning to load nerve gas into the missiles’ warheads, a move guaranteed to sow panic. Eschewing extended battle scenes and individual combat for the most part, the authors focus on spy missions behind enemy lines and recreations of meetings between historical characters. You can almost taste the gin and tonic as FDR and OSS chief William “Wild Bill” Donovan meet on the presidential yacht Sequoia to discuss plans for winning the war. Some readers might wish for more action, but series fans should be satisfied. (Aug.)
Library Journal
Both Operation Overlord and the Manhattan Project are threatened—in part by a mole who's passing Manhattan Project secrets to the Soviets (who were, of course, our allies in World War II). The next "Men at War" novel from the best-selling team of Griffin & Son. What else can I say?
Kirkus Reviews
The seventh installment of Griffin's Men at War series dramatizes a pivotal moment in the campaign against Hitler, who plans on hitting London with "aerial torpedos" laced with nerve gas--this while the U.S. is still developing the atomic bomb back home. The book opens in German-occupied Poland in the summer of 1943. Polish guerillas blow up railroad tracks to stop a train carrying scores of Jews to a death camp, only to a derail a private train with one car carrying a top Nazi officer. The incident sets in motion intelligence activities in Germany, Italy and Algeria designed to infiltrate the Nazis, turn some of Hitler's generals against him, and clear the way for the American invasion of Normandy--which Churchill steadfastly opposes, preferring to attack through the Mediterranean. There's also the question of who is selling Manhattan Project secrets to the Soviets. At the heart of the narrative are "Wild Bill" Donovan, headstrong chief of the Office of Strategic Services; his top agent, strapping 26-year-old Dick Canidy; Allen Dulles, head of the OSS in Switzerland; and his sympathetic old friend, German industrialist Wolfgang Kappler, whose son Oskar is a die-hard member of the SS. Hitler's top scientist, Wernher von Braun, plays a significant role in developing the V-2 rocket, years before he was whisked to the U.S. Griffin and Butterworth, his son, are completely at ease mixing fact and fiction, skillfully piecing together pieces of their narrative puzzle. Their writing is straightforward to a fault, sometimes reminding you of a scholastic "You Are There" novel, but the book never sags, and the characters never lose our interest. A knowing thriller in which the world must be saved on several fronts from the fascist threat.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780515151374
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
06/25/2013
Series:
Men at War Series , #7
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
464
Sales rank:
415,346
Product dimensions:
4.25(w) x 7.50(h) x 1.00(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
"A storyteller in the grand tradition."—Tom Clancy"The poet laureate of the American military."—Los Angeles Daily News"You can almost taste the gin and tonic as FDR and OSS chief William ‘Wild Bill’ Donovan meet on the presidential yacht Sequoia to discuss plans for winning the war."—Publishers Weekly

Meet the Author

W.E.B. Griffin is the author of six bestselling series: The Corps, Brotherhood of War, Badge of Honor, Men at War, Honor Bound, and Presidential Agent. He has been invested into the orders of St. George of the U.S. Armor Association and St. Michael of the Army Aviation Association of America, and is a life member of the U.S. Special Operations Association; Gaston-Lee Post 5660, Veterans of Foreign Wars; the American Legion, China Post #1 in Exile; the Police Chiefs Association of Southeastern Pennsylvania, Southern New Jersey, and the State of Delaware; the National Rifle Association; the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) Society; and the Flat Earth Society (Pensacola, Florida, and Buenos Aires, Argentina, chapters). He is an honorary life member of the U.S. Army Otter-Caribou Association, the U.S. Army Special Forces Association, the U.S. Marine Raider Association, and the USMC Combat Correspondents Association. Griffin lives in Alabama and Argentina. 
 
William E. Butterworth IV has been an editor and writer for more than twenty-five years, and has worked closely with his father for almost a decade on the editing and writing of the Griffin books. He is coauthor of the bestselling novels The Saboteurs, The Double Agents, Death and Honor, The Traffickers, The Honor of Spies, The Vigilantes, The Outlaws, Victory and Honor, and Covert Warriors. He is a member of the Sons of the American Legion, China Post #1 in Exile; the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) Society; and a life member of the National Rifle Association and the Texas Rifle Association. He lives in Texas.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Coppell, Texas
Date of Birth:
November 10, 1929
Place of Birth:
Newark, New Jersey

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The Spymasters 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 57 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have been a regular reader of WEB Griffin's works over the years and have read all his series multiple times. The Men at War series has been a very good read most of the time. This book was not one of his best. It moved along very slowly and did not deal with the multiple scenarios found in previous books in this series. When completed I was left with the feeling it was written more to set up coming releases than to be a good stand alone story. While I was a bit disappointed I hope the future releases will match other previous works.
pgfrench More than 1 year ago
Am a long time fan of Griffin. This book continues the mastery of the profession. While the storyline is essentially a continuation from prior series books, this book does a good stand-alone of the Spymasters story. A good read.
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MCPO-Ski-USN-Ret More than 1 year ago
I really didn't care for this book from WEB Griffin in that there was a lot of background going on a little of what was happening. I prefer his books where the characters are immersed in espionage or battling the enemy. I have read all of his series, and I just didn't think this one was up to snuff with the rest of his books. However, as much as I was disappointed in this particular book, I will still read his next book, regardless.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am done reading the series written by Griffin and"son". I thought it was just my perception of these co-authored books, but after reading other reviews I think I'm right. I used to love his books and looked forward to them. Since the writing partnership started the quality of the books has sunk quickly. I wasn't going to read THE SPYMASTERS after the previous book, but I tried it. I got it from the library because I was didn't want to risk a bad purchase. I am glad I didn't buy it. Same formula of retelling old information from previous books, unneeded filler information, and thin plots that don't stack up to previous books written just by Griffin. I am sorry that the franchise is being turned over to the son. I don't think that the son will be asked to join as many legions or orders as his father if it is based on writing ability. I can hope that there is a grandchild out there with the ability to write well enough so that this franchise doesn't go under. Until then, I'm done with the DeMille series.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As per usual for W.E.B. and son, a very good book with lots of obvious research. The only problem, for me anyway, is the complete in depth details. I end up getting lost in the details. Good continuing story of the OSS and other under cover agencies during WWII. Getting on in age but I hope the stories continue.
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Aggiepolo80 More than 1 year ago
Another very good book from Griffin, what you would expect from him.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Like several successful authors, W.E.B. Griffin has fallen prey to the thought that it's OK to be paid by the pound. This is a shallow finish for the series that started with the "Brotherhood of War". It's clear that Griffin has run out of gas. I won't buy anymore books that are authored by xxxxxx x. xxxxxx and zzzzzzzz z. zzzzzz.