The Summer Queen (Snow Queen Series #3)

( 5 )

Overview

Sequel To The Hugo Award-Winning Bestseller The Snow Queen

The Summer Queen is the extraordinary sequel to one of science fiction's most celebrated novels, The Snow Queen. Set in a fully realized universe of wonders, this spectacular space epic, itself a finalist for the Hugo Award, is one of the most remarkable novels in the field.

A story that spans millennia, from the ruins of an ancient interstellar empire to the planets of the Hegemony ...

See more details below
Paperback (Reprint)
$20.98
BN.com price
(Save 27%)$28.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (12) from $4.58   
  • New (4) from $18.43   
  • Used (8) from $4.58   
The Summer Queen

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$7.99
BN.com price

Overview

Sequel To The Hugo Award-Winning Bestseller The Snow Queen

The Summer Queen is the extraordinary sequel to one of science fiction's most celebrated novels, The Snow Queen. Set in a fully realized universe of wonders, this spectacular space epic, itself a finalist for the Hugo Award, is one of the most remarkable novels in the field.

A story that spans millennia, from the ruins of an ancient interstellar empire to the planets of the Hegemony that rules human space, The Summer Queen is the multi-layered story of Tiamat, a world where the dolphin-like mers are harvested for the youth-prolonging serum extracted from their blood. But Tiamat is much more, for beneath Carbuncle, its capital, lies the old empire's greatest secret: an enormous forgotten technology which, though decaying, continues to affect the fates of the fallen empire's remnant cultures via the sybil-network--a data bank that binds the past and the future in its web of knowledge, As the Smith, genius mastermind of the hidden interstellar Brotherhood, tries feverishly to unlock its secrets, BZ Gundhalinu desperately strives to save the Hegemony, while the Summer Queen herself dares to create a new future for her people and her planet. And though each is acting alone, their fates will entwine in an astonishing climax that will change the universe forever.

The long-awaited sequel to the Hugo Award-winning The Snow Queen. Moon has succeeded the Snow Queen as ruler of Tiamat and, although still only a gentle 17-year-old, she must assume the powerful role of the Summer Queen. Through her tumultuous reign, she realizes that in order to save her universe, she must be more than a queen--she must become a goddess.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"As large and splendid as its predecessor." --Chicago Sun-Times

"Vinge has written a book which is a true sequel to The Snow Queen, and it's a winner. The Summer Queen is more complex, richer, and in the end more rewarding than The Snow Queen. Totally satisfying. This is the kind of book that could only be science fiction: the kind of book we're all richer for having in our field." --Tom Whitmore, Locus

"A sequel even more successful than the works that preceded it. Given that The Snow Queen won the 1981 Hugo for best novel, this is high praise indeed." --Philadelphia Inquirer

"The long-awaited sequel to Vinge's enormous The Snow Queen. . . . An absorbing and satisfying performance." --Kirkus Reviews (starred)

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Vinge returns to the worlds of her Hugo Award-winning The Snow Queen , blending complex characters and mythic resonances with the sweeping grandeur of an interplanetary saga. (Dec.)
Library Journal
As the Summer Star ascends in the skies above the planet Tiamat, marking the end of more than a century of exploitation by the technologically advanced Hegemony, Moon Dawntreader--the Summer Queen appointed to lead her people back to their traditional ways--breaks with ancient custom, choosing instead to prepare to meet the Hegemony's inevitable return on equal terms. In this sequel to The Snow Queen (Dell, 1980), Vinge weaves a complex web of tangled love affairs, secret cabals, political intrigue, and high adventure centering around a unique woman and her visionary gift. The breadth and richness of this sf epic invite comparison with Frank Herbert's Dune and Isaac Asimov's ``Foundation Trilogy.'' Although best read in tandem with its predecessor, this masterpiece of creative world-building is a priority purchase.
Kirkus Reviews
The long-awaited sequel to Vinge's enormous The Snow Queen (1980), an interstellar tug-of-war between the far-from-benevolent Hegemony and the backward-but-indispensable planet Tiamat. It is now Summer on Tiamat; the Hegemony has withdrawn, leaving the planet in the hands of the Snow Queen's clone, Moon. Numerous—too numerous—subplots get underway. Moon's former lover, BZ Gundhalinu, will be sent to World's End, where a wrecked Old Empire ship has spilled semi-sentient stardrive plasma; if Gundhalinu can control the plasma, faster-than-light travel will again be possible, ending Tiamat's periodic isolation. Elsewhere, Reede Kullervo, a researcher with a rebuilt brain, addicted to his own supercharging designer drug, will be ordered by the leader of the supercriminal Brotherhood to seek the immortality elixir whose only source is Tiamat. Meanwhile, Moon struggles to control Tiamat's rebellious factions, knowing that the planet's intelligent sea-dwelling "mers" are the source of the elixir, and that the ancient computer that links the galaxy's clairvoyant sibyls in an information network lies buried under Tiamat's chief city, Carbuncle; she dares not permit the Hegemony to control either the sibyl network or the elixir. Overcomplicated, as usual, with too many flabby patches, but much more rigorous and logical than its predecessor. Too, the pretentious allusions have been banished in favor of a welcome infusion of new ideas: all in all, an absorbing and satisfying performance.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780765304469
  • Publisher: Doherty, Tom Associates, LLC
  • Publication date: 5/1/2003
  • Series: Snow Queen Series , #3
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 688
  • Sales rank: 819,137
  • Product dimensions: 6.14 (w) x 9.21 (h) x 1.37 (d)

Meet the Author

Joan D. Vinge has won two Hugo Awards, one for her novel The Snow Queen. Author of ten novels and a number of film adaptations, her books have been bestsellers here and abroad. She lives in Madison, Wisconsin.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

TIAMAT: The Windwards

The hand released the bright ribbon of scarf, and it fluttered down. A hundred eager voices made one voice as the cluster of young girls exploded down the shining strand of beach.
Clavally Bluestone Summer sat watching on the cliff high above, feeling the sea wind against her face, feeling it sweep back her long, dark hair. Smiling, she closed her eyes and imagined that it was the wind of motion, that she was running with the others down below. She had run when she was a girl in races like this one, on so many islands across the Summer seas; hoping to be the winner, to be the Sea Mother's Chosen for the three days of the clan festival, garlanded with necklaces of clattering polished shells, fed the best and the sweetest of foods, given new clothes, honored by the elders, flirted with by all the young men.…
Her smile turned wistful; she fingered the trefoil pendant that gleamed in the sunlight against the laces of her loose homespun shirt. It had been a long time since she had run in one of those races. She had been a sibyl for nearly half her life now. How was it possible…? She opened her eyes, filling them with the endless bluegreen of sea and sky, ever-changing and yet ever constant; the mottled clouds, the shimmering ephemera of rainbows from a distant squall. The Twins smiled down on their gathering today, warming her shoulders with luxuriant heat. Spring was in the air, making her remember with longing her body's own springtime.
She glanced over her shoulder at the sound of footsteps. Her smile widened as she saw her husband making his way up the path with a basket of fish cakes and bread, a jug of beer in his other hand. She saw the gray-shot brown of his braided hair, his own trefoil gleaming in the sunlight.
Her smile faded as she watched him struggle up the steep hill. The stiffness in his joints was getting worse every year--too many years spent in drafty stone rooms, or making cold, wet crossings from island to island for weeks at a time. Danaquil Lu was a Winter; he had not been bred to the hard life of a Summer, and his body rebelled against it. But he rarely spoke any word of complaint or regret, because he belonged here, where he was free to live his life as a sibyl…and because his heart belonged to her.
The weather was warming; the Summer Star was brightening in their sky, Summer had come into its own. Perhaps the warmer days would ease his pain. Her smile came back as she saw his eyes, bright and bluegreen like the sea, smiling up at her.
He sat down with the basket of food, trying not to grimace. She put an arm around his shoulders, massaging his back gently as she pointed down at the beach. "Look, it's almost over!" Another shout rose from the watchers below as the runners reached the finish line drawn in the wet sand. They watched a young girl with a bright flag of yellow hair sprint across the line first, watched her being embraced and garlanded and borne away.
"It was a good race, Dana," she said, hearing the memories in her voice.
Danaquil Lu sighed, nodding; but somehow the gesture felt to her as if he had shaken his head. "We're young for such a short time," he murmured, "and we're old for such a long time."
She turned to look at him. "Come now," she said, too cheerfully, because she had been feeling the same way. "How can you say that on a day like this?" and she kissed him, to make certain he didn't try to answer.
He laughed in surprise. They ate together, enjoying the day and each other's company, an hour of solitude stolen from the questions of the festival-goers in the village below.
They came down the hill again at last. A clan gathering was always a joyful time--a time for being reunited with relatives and friends from all across the scattered islands of Summer; for remembering the Sea Mother, giving the Lady the tribute She deserved. This was the annual gathering of the Goodventures, one of the largest clans in the islands. They had been the religious leaders of Summer before the last Change--the clan of the previous Summer Queens--and they still held great influence.
Down by the stone wall of the quay the winner of the footrace, a laughing, freckled girl of no more than fourteen, was tossing the ritual offerings of worshipers and supplicants into the restless green water. Out in the bay, several mers from the colony that shared this island's shores looked on, a sure sign of the Sea's blessing. Clavally watched the girl's face, the sunlight radiant in her hair, and felt a sudden, unexpected surge of longing.
She had made a choice when she became a sibyl. It was a hard, restless life, traveling from island to island, speaking the Lady's wisdom to those who needed her, seeking out and training the ones who would follow after her, to guide a new generation of Summers. They said that it was "death to kill a sibyl, death to love a sibyl, death to be a sibyl."…Few if any men who were not sibyls themselves would dare to be a husband to one.
But even after she had met Danaquil Lu, she had gone on taking childbane, because it was too hard a life to inflict on a child, and she had no close relatives to help her raise one. And Danaquil Lu, with his bent back and aching joints, needed more and more of her care. She squeezed his hand tightly, and told her restless body to be quiet. Soon enough her childbearing time would be past, and the questions in her heart would be answered once and for all.
"A question, sibyl--?" A boy came up to them hesitantly, his brown braids flopping against his sleeveless linen tunic. His eyes chose Danaquil Lu to ask his question of; she guessed it was probably a question about girls.
"Ask, and I will answer." Danaquil Lu spoke the ritual response, smiling kindly.
Clavally let go of his hand with a farewell glance, granting the blushing boy privacy. She moved on through the crowd, half-hearing Danaquil Lu's voice behind her murmur "Input…" as he fell into the Transfer, and the boy's mumbled question.
"Sibyl?" A middle-aged, gray-haired Goodventure woman came up beside her, and Clavally stopped, expecting another question. But before her response could form, the woman said, "Are you going to Carbuncle?"
Clavally looked at her blankly. "To Carbuncle? Why?" she asked.
"Haven't you heard?" The woman looked annoyingly smug. "The new Summer Queen. She has asked all the sibyls of Summer to make a pilgrimage to the City in the North. She claims it is the Lady's will."
Clavally shook her head, expressing her disbelief as much as her ignorance. Carbuncle was the only real city on the entire planet, located far to the north, among the Winter clans. Its name meant both "jewel" and "fester." Tied to the offworlders' starport, it swarmed with their wonders and their corruption during the one-hundred-and-fifty-year cycles with the offworld Hegemony controlled Tiamat. During that time the Snow Queen reigned, the Winters claimed the city and all the lands around it for their own--and sibyls were forbidden in Carbuncle. The offworlders despised them, the Winters hated and feared them. Danaquil Lu had been born in the city, but he had been exiled when he became a sibyl.
But now the Change had come again. The Black Gate that the offworlders used to reach Tiamat had closed; the offworlders had gone away, and taken their technology with them. Even now the seas were warming. Gradually they would become too hot for the klee the Summers herded and for many of the fish they netted at sea. The mers, the Sea Mother's other children, were migrating north, and the Summers were preparing for their own migration as well. Their ways would become this world's ways again, as the Winters relearned the old rules of survival and harmony with the Sea, and the Summer Queens showed them the human face of the Lady's wisdom.
"But why would the Summer Queen--or the Lady--want sibyls in the city," Clavally asked, "and not among the people, helping them to find the way to their new lives?"
"She said that she wanted to tell all the sibyls of a greater purpose, their true purpose, that had been revealed to her by the Sea Mother." The Goodventure woman shrugged and wiped her perspiring face. "But there are those who ask, What possible purpose could a sibyl find, which is better than to do what you do now--?"
"Yes," Clavally murmured uncertainly. "It's a strange request."
"What is?" Danaquil Lu came up beside her, raising his eyebrows.
"The Summer Queen has asked all the sibyls to come to Carbuncle, so that she can speak to them," she said. And she watched her husband's face turn ashen. The scars on his cheek--the cruel legacy of his casting-out from Carbuncle--suddenly stood out like a brand. He took hold of her arm, not-quite-casually, steadying himself.
"Oh," was all he said. He took a deep breath, filling his lungs with clear sea air.
"We needn't go," Clavally said softly, looking up at him. "There will be enough others without us."
"A wise decision. But why do you look like the news brings you no joy, Clavally Bluestone?" A heavyset, weathered woman joined them; Clavally recognized Capella Goodventure, the clan headwoman.
Clavally didn't answer, looking back at Danaquil Lu, who was gazing out to sea as if he were suddenly there alone.
"Or your pledged, either," Capella said, her voice prying like fingers. "What clan is he with--?" Clavally heard the tone in her voice which said she knew the answer, although Danaquil Lu wore no embroidery on his shirt, no token of clan membership.
"Wayaways," Danaquil Lu said flatly, looking back at her. His expression said that he recognized the tone in her voice, too.
"Wayaways? But isn't that a Winter clan?" Capella said, with sour insinuation. The sound of her surprise rang as false as a cracked bell. "I would think you'd be eager to return to your home."
"It isn't my home," he snapped. "I am a sibyl."
"Of course you are." She stared at his trefoil. "A Winter who worships the Lady. Aren't you unusual." She rubbed her arms, looking out at the sea.
Danaquil Lu looked away from her again, irritation plain on his face. He did not believe in the Lady; or in anything at all except his calling. But the Lady believed in him. Clavally looked back at Capella Goodventure, frowning. She had never been fond of the Goodventures' elder. She was becoming less fond of her now with every heartbeat. She opened her mouth to inquire whether Capella had a question to ask, or not.
"I would go nowhere near the City, if I were a sibyl," Capella said, looking back at her. "I was in Carbuncle at the last Festival. It was my duty to oversee the crowning of the Summer Queen--and the drowning of the Snow Queen." She smiled slightly; Clavally tightened her jaw, and held her tongue. "And what I saw then made me wonder whether the Lady has abandoned Carbuncle forever."
"What do you mean?" Clavally asked, her curiosity forcing the words out against her will.
"The new queen claims to be a sibyl."
Clavally's eyes widened. Her hand touched the trefoil hanging against her chest. "But isn't that a good--"
"--But," Capella Goodventure went on, relentlessly, "she's white as snow; she looks exactly like the old queen, Arienrhod." Her voice dripped vitriol. "She forsook the proper rituals of the Change; she speaks blasphemies about the Lady's will. She chooses to live in the Snow Queen's palace--and she went so far as to have me turned out of it when I tried to show her how her willfulness could harm us all."
Ah, Clavally thought.
"The Winter gossip says that she is the old Queen's illegal clone, an unnatural copy of herself, made for her by the offworlders to oppress us," Capella Goodventure went on. "She couldn't possibly be a Summer, even though she claims to belong to the Dawntreader clan--"
"The Dawntreaders?" Clavally said, startled. "I knew a sibyl of the Dawntreaders, about five years ago. Her name was Moon--"
This time it was the Goodventure woman who looked surprised.
"Is she the new Queen?" Clavally asked, incredulous. She read the answer in the other woman's eyes.
"You know her?" Capella Goodventure demanded. "What did she look like?"
"She would be young, and very fair--her hair was almost white. Her eyes were a strange, shifting color, like fog-agates.…" She knew again, from the look on the other woman's face, that she had described the new Queen.
"She is a sibyl," Danaquil Lu said abruptly. "We trained her ourselves. And she was a Summer. I would have known if she was not."
Capella Goodventure looked at him, her eyes narrowing; he met her stare, until finally she was the one who looked away. "She isn't right," she said finally, looking at Clavally again. "I will tell you what I have told every sibyl I've seen--I have to return to the city, but you do not. Don't go to Carbuncle." She turned and started away, her angry momentum splitting the crowd like a ship's wake.
Clavally looked at Danaquil Lu, found him already looking at her. "Perhaps the only thing that's truly wrong with the new Queen is that she isn't a Goodventure," she murmured.
Danaquil Lu's mouth twitched with a fleeting, ironic smile; the smile disappeared. "What do you really think?" he asked her.
She brushed at a fly that was buzzing in her ear like doubt, and felt another frown start to form. "I remember the girl Moon Dawntreader that we knew. She was different…there was something about her…but I always felt that it was good. I think that I want to know for myself what the truth is, Dana."
He nodded, his face pinching. "You want to go to Carbuncle."
Slowly she nodded. "But what do you think? What do you feel?…What do you want to do?"
He looked out across the sea again, squinting with the glare of light on water, looking north. She saw him swallow as if something were caught in his throat. At last he said, "I want to go home."

Copyright © 1991 by Joan D. Vinge

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 5 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(5)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 26, 2003

    An author truly missed.

    A true tragedy there are no other books available by this great author. I thoroughly enjoyed both 'The Summer Queen' and 'The Snow Queen'.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Superb speculative fiction

    The Winter clan¿s century and a half reign over Tiamat is ended and now its Summer¿s time to rule with Moon as the leader. Moon, vowing a different economic path through technology, has ended the harvesting of the Mers whose blood was the cash crop sellable commodity, providing off world longevity to clients. The Hegemony also has left the planet.<P> Moon's former lover, Gundhalinu, attempts to save the Hegemony by trying to gain control over stardrive plasma spilled from a wrecked Old Empire ship. If he succeeds, faster-than-light travel will become available as it once was and Tiamat will no longer suffer periods of isolation. However, the Brotherhood seeks the immortality elixir allegedly found only on Tiamat while Moon clashes with opponents over the fate of the Mers, as these intelligent beings are the source of the elixir. She also must keep safe the ancient computer hidden under the planet¿s prime city that links the galaxy's clairvoyants. If the Hegemony obtain either the people of Tiamat will face endless winter, but if the Hegemony gain both the people of the galaxy will face eternal winter.<P> Surprisingly the sequel to THE SNOW QUEEN is a tighter, albeit still very complicated, planetary thriller. The story line is loaded with many concepts though some get shortchanged because of the abundance. The key charcaters are fully developed (critical in this novel) so that the audience appreciates Moon¿s troubles and her former lover¿s endeavor. Joan D. Vinge provides readers with a strong galaxy tale that shows why she was nominated for a Hugo for this work (and won with the first story).<P> Harriet Klausner

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 14, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)