Thursday's Child

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Overview

Sonya Hartnett’s haunting, mythical novel - now in paperback

Harper Flute believes that her younger brother Tin, with his uncanny ability to dig, was born to burrow. While their family struggles to survive in a bleak landscape during the Great Depression, the silent and elusive little Tin - "born on a Thursday and so fated to his wanderings" - begins to escape underground, tunneling beneath their tiny shanty. As time passes, Tin becomes a wild ...

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2003 Paperback Fine Paperback, Like New, clean, tight, unmarked, no spine or cover creases, remainder mark, light edge wear. () Sonya Hartnett's haunting, mythical novel-now ... in paperback Harper Flute believes that her younger brother Tin, with his uncanny ability to dig, was born to burrow. While their family struggles to survive in a bleak landscape during the Great Depression, the silent and elusive little Tin-All orders are shipped by kbooks every business day. Read more Show Less

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2003 Paperback Fine Paperback, Like New, clean, tight, no spine or cover creases, Remainder mark, some light cover edge wear() Sonya Hartnett's haunting, mythical novel-now in ... paperback Harper Flute believes that her younger brother Tin, with his uncanny ability to dig, was born to burrow. While their family struggles to survive in a bleak landscape during the Great Depression, the silent and elusive little Tin-All orders are shipped by kbooks every business day. Read more Show Less

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Overview

Sonya Hartnett’s haunting, mythical novel - now in paperback

Harper Flute believes that her younger brother Tin, with his uncanny ability to dig, was born to burrow. While their family struggles to survive in a bleak landscape during the Great Depression, the silent and elusive little Tin - "born on a Thursday and so fated to his wanderings" - begins to escape underground, tunneling beneath their tiny shanty. As time passes, Tin becomes a wild thing, leaving his family further and further behind.

With exquisite prose, richly drawn characters, and a touch of magical realism, Sonya Hartnett tells a breathtakingly original coming-of-age story through the clear eyes of an observant child. It’s an unsentimental portrait of a loving family faced with poverty and heartbreak, entwined with a surreal vision of the enigmatic Tin, disappearing into a mysterious labyrinth that reaches unimaginably far, yet remains hauntingly near.

"Will be treasured by teens. . . . A beautiful and complex coming-of-age story that will burrow into young people’s deepest hopes and fears, shining light on the darkest rooms." - BOOKLIST (starred review)

A young woman, looking back on her childhood, recounts her farm family's poverty, her father's cowardice, and her younger brother's obsession for digging tunnels and living underground.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Sonya Hartnett has written a haunting story that burrows deep into the hidden lives of children. Beautifully written and endlessly satisfying."—Ellen Wittlinger, author of HARD LOVE, a Michael L. Printz honor book — None

"THURSDAY'S CHILD is a brilliant story, brilliantly told—so deeply imagined and dreamlike in its unfolding, so compelling and believable in the wild, extreme world it creates. Hartnett's beautifully rendered vision drew me in from the very start and carried me along,
above and under ground, to the very end. This book amazed me."

—Carolyn Coman, award-winning author of MANY STONES and WHAT JAMIE SAW — None

From the Hardcover edition.

Publishers Weekly
In a starred review, PW wrote, "Set in the harsh mining outback of Australia during the Depression, this startling coming-of-age story combines the narrator's grindingly realistic account of a family mired in poverty with a more surreal tale of her younger brother, gifted with an uncanny ability to dig through the earth and create his own subterranean world." Ages 14-up. (Sept.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
This book is as original as it is haunting. Harper, who is six years old when the story begins and twenty-one when it ends, is a middle child struggling with her family's tragedies and eccentricities during the Depression. She's a winning character, self-admittedly afflicted with the "unholy habit" of eavesdropping. Meanwhile, Tin, her five-year-old brother, lives and builds tunnels beneath their house, "having taught his hands the language of the dirt ... to trust its sturdy promises and to read its crumbly mind." By the end of the book he has become a feral creature of almost mythical proportion. As Harper's father becomes increasingly unstable, and her sister and brothers leave home, Harper is left feeling caged, angry, and alone. The destruction of her home's foundation by Tin's digging becomes literal as well as metaphorical. The fresh voice, lyrical prose, and bizarre circumstances create a potent mix¾but not one that will appeal to everyone. Imagine Ellen Foster showing up in The Grapes of Wrath, with a touch of surrealism. This unusual mix and fine writing will definitely intrigue some young adult readers, but may attract an even larger adult audience. 2002 (orig. 2000), Candlewick,
— Betty Hicks
KLIATT
This hauntingly beautiful novel about one Australian family's struggles during the Great Depression should appeal to thoughtful YAs. Harper Flute, a seven-year-old girl at the time of the story's inception, recalls the remarkable story of her life from the vantage point of a young woman of 21 who is finally able to come to terms with her strange childhood and accept it for what it was. Her eventful passage from childhood to maturity is marked by enough mystery and suspense to keep the reader wondering until the last page. Harper takes her little brother Tin to a nearby creek while their little brother Caffy is being born. A mud avalanche buries Tin, but their father arrives to rescue him just in time. From that moment, we see Tin withdraw silently into his own world of digging under the family's shanty home, where he stays practically day and night. Harper shows an unusual degree of insight for a child when she tells her parents that "...he's not digging tunnels. He's just changing the shape of things." When the shanty caves into the tunnels Tin has dug, the family must depend on their neighbors to donate both housing materials and labor. The proud and independent Flutes must accept charity from those who have belittled them in the past. There is suspense in this story when Caffy falls into a well and older sister Audrey is forced to endure abuse from a sinister neighbor. In both cases, Tin mysteriously surfaces to the rescue from his subterranean dwelling. Although some issues remain unresolved at the finish, the novel nevertheless has a satisfying ending as the Flute family is finally able to escape from the prison of their poverty. Thursday's Child is a story about independence and theneed that we all have to shape our own lives without interference from others. The author uses the imagery of caves, tunnels, fences and prisons to reinforce her theme that we must seek to liberate ourselves from whatever confines us as individuals. Despite the seriousness of its theme, humor is abundant in this book because of the narrator's clever choice of language. KLIATT Codes: SA*; Exceptional book, recommended for senior high school students, advanced students, and adults. 2000, Candlewick, 261p.,
— Phyllis LaMontagne
VOYA
Harper's story spans fifteen years, beginning when Harper, at the age of six, watches her younger brother, Tin, disappear in a mudslide. He survives and so does Harper's family, despite devastating poverty and hardship in post
— Judy Sasges
School Library Journal
Gr 7 Up-This novel from Australia details the hardscrabble life of a rural family during the Great Depression. When the story begins, Harper, the narrator, is seven. She relates the many misfortunes that have befallen her family. The oddest member of the clan is her little brother, Tin, who gets temporarily buried in a collapsed creek bank when he is only four. After this incident, burrowing and tunneling become a way of life. The family sees him only occasionally as he gradually turns into a subterranean feral creature, hardly recognizable as human. This surreal strand of plot in an otherwise gritty, realistic story is jarring for a while, but eventually it becomes an accepted piece of the family saga. The father is often mean-spirited and ineffectual when it comes to caring for his loved ones, but is not a stereotypical brute. The mother's character is less well defined, but she comes across as long suffering and protective of her brood. A wealthy neighbor's ulterior motive in hiring the oldest daughter as a servant seems to escape everyone's notice until it is too late. The story begins slowly, gathers momentum, and builds to a page-turning climax. Along the way, the family's house collapses into Tin's antlike tunnels below, one child is the victim of a tragic accident, and Tin, ever watchful, metes out his own terrible justice when his sister Audrey is threatened. This title may be a hard sell due to its strangeness, but readers who stick with it will be rewarded with a unique and fascinating experience.-Bruce Anne Shook, Mendenhall Middle School, Greensboro, NC Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Hartnett (Princes, 1998, etc.) tells a fantastic tale of an ordinary life during the Great Depression. Narrator Harper Flute begins with her brother Tin, "born on a Thursday, and so fated to his wanderings," and about the day he went underground. Having a baby brother who burrows beneath her family's ill-fated plot of land doesn't seem odd to her young eyes. Neither does her father, who, permanently "changed" by the Great War, has taken a farm plot though he knows nothing about farming, and squanders his inheritance on three breeding cows just as the stock market collapses. Harper's voice is precise, charged, and involved. Her nearsighted view broadens as the reader watches her grow. Her bossy older sister becomes a frustrated romantic, and her helpful older brother gives up on the family he's struggled to hold together through his adolescence. Tin disappears more and more from sight, becoming an allegorical and literal underpinning of the family. Hartnett's narrative stands on edge between the mundane and the stuff of legend, as Harper's childhood unfolds precisely and peculiarly towards the event that changes her family forever. Dark, unusual, familiar, and slightly miraculous-Hartnett's story is not for everyone, but it leaves its mark. (Fiction. YA)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780763622039
  • Publisher: Candlewick Press
  • Publication date: 8/15/2003
  • Edition description: First
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 272
  • Age range: 14 years
  • Product dimensions: 4.78 (w) x 7.04 (h) x 0.74 (d)

Meet the Author

Sonya Hartnett is the author of several acclaimed novels - the first written when she was just thirteen - and the recipient of many prestigious awards in her native Australia. She says Tin and his tunneling had their origin in ants: "I was living at the time in two rooms, just going back and forth, back and forth as I watched an entire summer of ants excavating under my house. One day it occurred to me that they probably had a huge palace under there. And that’s when I started to think about ways of taking your existence into your own hands - of how, if the space around you was not big enough, you might just dig out some more." This is Sonya Hartnett’s first book with Candlewick Press.
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Read an Excerpt

The land where we lived was by nature dry and dusty but that winter there'd been more rain than a duck would have dreamed of and when I glanced at Tin the mud was seeping up between his toes and he was sinking into the earth, shivering and half asleep. I shook him wakeful and hurried him along. "Where will we go, Tin?" I asked, not expecting any answer because he was generally reticent. "Will we go fishing?"

I had him moving at a trot and his head was joggling up and down, which I took to signify his agreement. There weren't any fish in the creek but he was at the age where you can fool them. He was certain to start whining sooner or later, anyway, no matter what we did, and the best I could do was stall that commotion as long as I could. I had a pin in the hem of my dress and I stopped to unfasten it and give it to him. He examined it carefully before looking at me quizzically through tangles of dandelion hair. "You can spike a fish with that," I explained. "That's your hook."

I could see he liked that sharp reflecting thing. It was half a mile to the creek and I put him on my back and hiked him most of the way, he being light as a feather. I talked to keep him distracted, telling him it was callous to stab my throat with the pin and what would the baby be, a new boy or a new girl? We had two of each already, not counting Mam and Da, so things were pretty equal as they stood and it would be a hard blow to the side that came away the minority. I thought it was a shame that only babies could be born, whichever it turned out being. I could think of plenty of other things I would have preferred to get for nothing.

The creek was typically a drool of a waterway but that afternoon it was running high because of all the rain and the bank was soft and oozy; Tin's feet disappeared to his ankles and he was covered in mud before he even reached the water. He was a dark child anyway, so it didn't look too bad on him. I set on a rock and left him to his devices and looked around, bored. There were white-trunked trees on either side of the creek and you could see where the rain had washed away the earth that had hidden their roots and the roots poked out knotted and naked, groping. It was that quiet, cold kind of day when the birds are surly and refusing to sing and the leaves on the branches aren't moving and seem like they never could. The creek was sluggish, hardly rippling, made from something thick and heavier than water. I was hungry, and could hear my stomach rumbling. I would have exchanged a new baby a hundred times over for a plate of something warm to eat.

When I looked again at Tin he was crouched staring and musing in the shallows with the seat of his pants drenched black, so I crawled forward to see what was diverting him. There was a fish there, swimming in his shadow. There was a whole crowd of fishes, when I looked harder, stranded in a pocket of rock as if the creek had splashed them there for safekeeping or for Tin's amusement alone. "Oh!" I exclaimed. The fish were the length of Tin's thumb, each of them, and not worth the hooking, but they were pretty and silvery, they looked like that hem pin come alive. Tin was sucking on the pin so I took it from him and stirred the rockpool's water and the fish spangled and flashed in agitation. I put a finger in the water and the whole crowd darted and tapped and knocked and nibbled. Tin's teeth were clickering with the cold now; he crossed the steppingstones to the opposite bank and from the way he tugged despondently at a handful of tree root and looked mournfully in the direction of home I could tell he was pondering the practicality of crying. He wandered a distance upstream, clutching the bank to steady himself, hoisting his knees so silt and water came pouring off his heels. "Tin," I said, "come and look at the dainty fishes."

He wouldn't; he turned his face to the mucky wall of the creek and stood there, up to his knees in water. I wasn't about to pander to his childishness so I took no notice of him. I caught a fish in the bowl of my palm and it lashed about while the water drained between my fingers and then lay flat on its side, heaving like a bellows. I petted it with a fingertip and touched it to my lips. It didn't taste like anything. "Look, Tin," I said, but he went on masquerading to be deaf. So, "Look, Tin," I said again, this time making my voice full of wonder and amazement which he could surely not resist, same as a cat can't resist investigating when you suggest there's something hidden she might like to see. If it works on a cat it should work on a four-year-old, but it didn't. Tin stayed where he was and when I glanced over my shoulder full of annoyance, he wasn't anywhere. And the creek bank looked different somehow, with clots of dryish earth rolling down its flank and plinking into the water and the ground all about torn through with a great cleave, and I could hear the dog-scratch sound of tree roots tearing. The creek bank had caved in, right on top of Tin. There was not a spot of him left to be seen. That tiny fish I had in my hand went slithering into the water.

THURSDAY'S CHILD by Sonya Hartnett. Copyright (c) 2000 by Sonya Hartnett. Published by Candlewick Press, Inc., Cambridge, MA.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2005

    Thought Provoking and Inspiring

    The saying goes 'Thursday's child is full of woe'. That's the reason why nine year old Harper assumes her younger brother Tin, who was born on a Thursday, practices a disturbing fascination of burrowing and residing underground. Thus, we follow Harper's startling narration, from innocence to evolving adulthood. I read 'Thursday's Child' in one sitting at the age of thirteen, and it's premise has never left me since. It is richly fascinating, with good character development and gripping narration from nine year old Harper. I highly recommended this book for teens and adults. Don't be put off by the haunting picture on the cover, or the dark subject matter. This book is a refreshing, original masterpiece. Thursday's Child is sure to leave you awed and inspired.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 20, 2003

    A book beautifully written and a story expertly told.

    James Augustin Barnabas Flute, otherwise known as 'Tin,' was born on a Thursday. Which, according to his older sister Harper who narrates this dark coming-of-age novel, fated him to his wanderings. An older Harper looks back on her not quite seven-year-old self and remembers the day when her youngest brother Caffy was born - the day when Tin stopped being the impoverished family's baby, which is also the day when Tin learned how to dig. The family's story from then on diverges from Tin's, as the small boy slowly transforms into a wild creature whose home is a self-created network of tunnels beneath their shanty. Most of the time Tin is invisible to the others, a person lost - less and less human, as time passes - yet still loved. Still one of their own. This literary novel's premise borders on speculative fiction, with wonderfully creepy effect. Tin's life intersects with those of his family at crisis points throughout the story, as their already difficult existence becomes ever more so. What will this wild and often frightening child bring his loved ones in the end? Will he be their doom - their salvation - or both? Despite its darkness, which at times feels extreme, 'Thursday's Child' is a book beautifully written and a story expertly told. I recommend it highly, although not to young readers prone to nightmares!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 18, 2003

    It was Great!

    I loved this book especially because i was on the cover of this book! That poor pathetic girl on the front is me. Im Harper. Its true, i wouldnt lie about it. Anyways.... I loved the book because it showed the troubles of a family and how the overcome them. I really enjoyed it! I would definetly recommend this book to anyone 12 and over because it may confuse anyone younger than that!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 6, 2003

    i liked this book

    this was a good book, very imaginative, and creative. you really get into this book!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2003

    Review of Thursday's Child

    Author¡¯s Name: Sonya Hartnett Title: Thursday¡¯s Child Genre: Young-Adult (Novel) Harper is a girl who is living during the great depression, and surviving in harsh circumstances including sometimes being without food. The amazing thing about her is that she¡¯s still living her life normally despite all the problems. Sonya Hartnett wrote this book so well that it seemed like she was living during that time period. Her descriptions made me feel the same way the characters did throughout the book. Her writing really made me think about how I¡¯m living compared to the family in the book. The best description in the book is where the main character is describing her dogs and the area around the house. ¡°The shanty with dogs lying in the gray sunlight and Devon¡¯s summer bed folded on the verenda and no grass, just earth and slime.¡± I made many connections with the book while I was reading it. The beginning of it didn¡¯t really make much sense, but if you keep reading everything becomes clear. I connected to the book to the world by comparing it to world and less fortunate families that are living in the world right now. The families are barely surviving and we might not consider how much they need our help. In the book, the neighbors helped the family through their problems, and that made me think that I could do the same for people in need. A strategy for reading this book is to visualize. Since there are no pictures, you really need to depend on the descriptions. This book moves very fast, and every moment something is happening. If you get lost and don¡¯t understand, I suggest you reread the chapter. The book is really well written, but at a high level.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 29, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

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