To Catch a Spy (Toby Peters Series #22)

To Catch a Spy (Toby Peters Series #22)

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by Stuart M. Kaminsky
     
 

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A simple job turns treacherous when Toby Peters stumbles upon a corpseIt’s a lucky thing that Cary Grant once trained as an acrobat, because Toby Peters’s life is in the actor’s hands. As the two men sprint through the pitch-dark woods, trying to elude the man with the gun, they come to a canyon ledge. With nowhere to go but down, they…  See more details below

Overview

A simple job turns treacherous when Toby Peters stumbles upon a corpseIt’s a lucky thing that Cary Grant once trained as an acrobat, because Toby Peters’s life is in the actor’s hands. As the two men sprint through the pitch-dark woods, trying to elude the man with the gun, they come to a canyon ledge. With nowhere to go but down, they scramble over the side. Peters slips, and Grant grabs hold of his wrist. As the killer closes in, Cary’s grip begins to falter. The job began simply. Grant hired the Hollywood detective as a bagman in a blackmailing hand-off. He gives Toby a satchel full of cash, to be exchanged for an envelope of the leading man’s secrets—not sexual or financial, but details of his work for the British crown. When the envelope bearer winds up dead, Toby and Cary dive into a complex plot of murder, money, and Nazi spies, which ends with them trapped in an all-too-literal cliffhanger.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
For anyone with a taste for old Hollywood B-movie mysteries, Edgar winner Kaminsky offers plenty of nostalgic fun in his 22nd book to feature good-natured, unprepossessing sleuth Toby Peters (after 2001's A Few Minutes Past Midnight). Having solved cases for the likes of Bette Davis, Humphrey Bogart and the Marx Brothers, Toby now takes on as a client Bristol's own Archibald Alexander Leach, aka Cary Grant. A note at the start explains that King George VI awarded Grant a medal in 1947 for somewhat vague services during WWII. Kaminsky supposes Grant to have been a British intelligence agent, his job to detect the activities of Nazi sympathizers in Hollywood. Married to Woolworth heiress Barbara Hutton at the time, he finds more pro-Nazis among his wife's rich friends than among the acting community. Grant hires Toby, who packs a .38 with which he's unable to hit the broad side of a sound stage, to deliver a satchel of money in the dark of night to a man who'll give him an envelope in return. Need anyone ask what occurs? Shots ring out. The man Toby is to meet dies with the name "George Hall" on his lips, while Toby receives the first of many conks on the head, knocking him cold. Toby and the acrobatic Grant at his lithe best make an appealing team. The tone is light, the pace brisk, the tongue firmly in cheek. The series may be tissue thin by this point, but fans are in for a merry ride. (July 1) FYI: Kaminsky is also the author of Murder on the Trans-Siberian Express (Forecasts, Sept. 3, 2001), the latest in his Porfiry Rostnikov series, and of Retribution (Forecasts, Oct. 22, 2001), his second Lew Fonesca novel, plus more than 70 other novels. Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Private eye Toby Peters, who's been pushing 50 since 1977, is finally showing his age. So when he gets cold-cocked while trying to exchange a bag full of cash for an envelope full of documents in Elysian Park after dark, even his long-suffering girlfriend Anita suggests that maybe this time he ought to leave it alone-though, with a dozen stitches, he got off easier than Bruno Volkman, the document guy, who landed in the morgue. But Peter's client, Cary Grant, is so charming that he can't leave it alone. So in spite of warnings from the LAPD, the FBI, and a Brooklyn-born psychic named Juanita, he continues to poke into Volkman's shady past, finding brochures in his apartment that send him to a radio shop and the drama department of a local college and tracking down the mysterious "George Hall"-the last words to pass Volkman's lips. Fortified by a hearty breakfast of his landlady's signature Trout Plaut (sauteed with peanut butter), he manages to get himself kidnapped and roughed up a bit more while uncovering some decidedly anti-American covert activity. But it sends him literally over the edge when the bad guys snatch his officemate Sheldon Minck and his indispensable secretary Violet. The latest in prolific Kaminsky's Toby Peters series is a mild-mannered thriller-peril but no real mystery-that seems to be marking time between his last zany adventure (A Few Minutes Past Midnight, 2001) and the next.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781453232903
Publisher:
MysteriousPress.com/Open Road
Publication date:
12/13/2011
Series:
Toby Peters Series , #22
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
252
Sales rank:
270,798
File size:
1 MB

Meet the Author

Stuart M. Kaminsky (1934–2009) was one of the most prolific crime fiction authors of the last four decades. Born in Chicago, he spent his youth immersed in pulp fiction and classic cinema—two forms of popular entertainment which he would make his life’s work. After college and a stint in the army, Kaminsky wrote film criticism and biographies of the great actors and directors of Hollywood’s Golden Age. In 1977, when a planned biography of Charlton Heston fell through, Kaminsky wrote Bullet for a Star, his first Toby Peters novel, beginning a fiction career that would last the rest of his life. Kaminsky penned twenty-four novels starring the detective, whom he described as “the anti-Philip Marlowe.” In 1981’s Death of a Dissident, Kaminsky debuted Moscow police detective Porfiry Rostnikov, whose stories were praised for their accurate depiction of Soviet life. His other two series starred Abe Lieberman, a hardened Chicago cop, and Lew Fonseca, a process server. In all, Kaminsky wrote more than sixty novels. He died in St. Louis in 2009.

Stuart M. Kaminsky (1934–2009) was one of the most prolific crime fiction authors of the last four decades. Born in Chicago, he spent his youth immersed in pulp fiction and classic cinema—two forms of popular entertainment which he would make his life’s work. After college and a stint in the army, Kaminsky wrote film criticism and biographies of the great actors and directors of Hollywood’s Golden Age. In 1977, when a planned biography of Charlton Heston fell through, Kaminsky wrote Bullet for a Star, his first Toby Peters novel, beginning a fiction career that would last the rest of his life. Kaminsky penned twenty-four novels starring the detective, whom he described as “the anti-Philip Marlowe.” In 1981’s Death of a Dissident, Kaminsky debuted Moscow police detective Porfiry Rostnikov, whose stories were praised for their accurate depiction of Soviet life. His other two series starred Abe Lieberman, a hardened Chicago cop, and Lew Fonseca, a process server. In all, Kaminsky wrote more than sixty novels. He died in St. Louis in 2009. 

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