When Everything Changed: The Amazing Journey of American Women from 1960 to the Present
  • When Everything Changed: The Amazing Journey of American Women from 1960 to the Present
  • When Everything Changed: The Amazing Journey of American Women from 1960 to the Present

When Everything Changed: The Amazing Journey of American Women from 1960 to the Present

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by Gail Collins
     
 

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Picking up where her previous successful, and highly lauded book, America's Women, left off, Gail Collins recounts the sea change women have experienced since 1960. A comprehensive mix of oral history and Collins's keen research, this is the definitive book about five crucial decades of progress, told with the down-to-earth, amusing, and agenda-free tone

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Overview

Picking up where her previous successful, and highly lauded book, America's Women, left off, Gail Collins recounts the sea change women have experienced since 1960. A comprehensive mix of oral history and Collins's keen research, this is the definitive book about five crucial decades of progress, told with the down-to-earth, amusing, and agenda-free tone this beloved New York Times columnist is known for. The interviews with women who have lived through these transformative years include an advertising executive in the 60s who was not allowed to attend board meetings that took place in the all-male dining room; and an airline stewardess who remembered being required to bend over to light her passengers' cigars on the men-only 'Executive Flight' from New York to Chicago.

We, too, may have forgotten the enormous strides made by women since 1960—and the rare setbacks. "Hell yes, we have a quota [7%]" said a medical school dean in 1961. "We do keep women out, when we can." At a pre-graduation party at BarnardCollege, "they handed corsages to the girls who were engaged and lemons to those who weren't." In 1960, two-thirds of women 18-60 surveyed by Gallup didn't approve of the idea of a female president. Until 1972, no woman ran in the Boston Marathon, the year when Title IX passed, requiring parity for boys and girls in school athletic programs (and also the year after Nixon vetoed the childcare legislation passed by congress). What happened during the past fifty years—a period that led to the first woman's winning a Presidential Primary—and why? The cataclysmic change in the lives of American women is a story Gail Collins seems to have been born totell.

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Editorial Reviews

Gail Collins' America's Women (HarperCollins, 0061227226, $15.99) escorted readers through "400 years of dolls, drudges, helpmates, and heroines," thus setting the stage for this inspiring recap of the amazing progress (and occasional setbacks) experienced by women in the past five decades. The first chapters of When Everything Changed will astonish many younger readers with their accounts of the casually expressed sexism of the Korean War and Vietnam War era; even older men and women will bristle with anger at Collins's stories of hard-fought battles for basic human rights. Like its predecessor, this narrative history by a veteran New York Times columnist avoids preachiness as its move briskly forward. Snapshots of a revolution not yet won. Now in paperback.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780316014045
Publisher:
Little, Brown and Company
Publication date:
10/21/2010
Pages:
475
Sales rank:
172,303
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.20(h) x 1.40(d)

Meet the Author

Gail Collins was the Editorial Page Editor for the New York Times from 2001-2007—the first woman to have held that position. She currently writes a column for the Time's Op-Ed page twice weekly.

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When Everything Changed: The Amazing Journey of American Women from 1960 to the Present 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 50 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The most important book I have ever read. I was born in 1948 & I felt the book was about my life. I bought copies for my friends & children.
SFlibres More than 1 year ago
Let me start out by clearly stating the I am not a raving feminist or "women's libber", but I wanted to read this book as I am a major history lover. Gail Collins writes in such an interesting way that is hard to stop thinking about. It is an unbiased, agenda-free, well-researched history of the way the role of women has changed in America over the past sixty years or so, and how we got where we are today. Discusses the broader trends and ideology while humanizing the story with interviews and stories of specific people, mostly women of course, and how they were affected. I was born in 1962, so it has been weird remembering part of what happened in the sixties, but not really being old enough to understand it all. This book has done a lot to explain to me why the seventies were as they were, why the suburban mothers in the sixties seemed so depressed and drank alot, and why so many women suddenly seemed to enter the work force during my high school years. Mostly, however, it has made clearer what women have courageously done in the past to allow me to have the opportunities that I have today. Superbly written, and highly recommended to anyone interested in women's issues, or recent American history.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ms. Collins excellently portrays the women's liberation movement of the 1960's and 1970's as an important event in American history. Without this movement , women today would live very differently. Through many anecdotes, Collins demonstrates how women fought for their rights to equal pay and treatment in the workforce, as well as the right to carry out financial transactions and personal medical decisions without the aid of their husband or father. Collins explains many of the larger issues in great detail, and those include issues such as: women in the workforce, politics, popular culture, economics; the sexual revolution; women's health rights such as abortion and contraceptives; and women in the family dynamic. While I do not always agree with her opinions, she does a fairly good job of presenting both sides to the issues. Overall, I enjoyed reading this book and  definitely learned more about how the women's liberation movement shaped the world as we know it today. 
DeniseAllene More than 1 year ago
This book was amazing. A must-read for women. I find myself referencing it in conversations. It brought to life experiences and stories that I never could have fully understood before this book. I can talk with my grandma and mom about things that happened in their lifetime that I could not have talked with them about before. Gives you an appreciation for what so many women did before us to make our lives what they are today.
emzy More than 1 year ago
I picked this book up because I wanted a historical timeline of the modern feminist movement, and it definitely delivered what I wanted. The narrative was a little slow and convoluted at times, but it was a surprisingly quick read. I'm young (under-21 young) and it gave a perspective on what feminists have had to undergo even recently, and helps set the stage for further advancement.
MagzMW More than 1 year ago
Excellent and fascinating story of the fight for women's rights in the second half of the 20th century. Collins uses her journalistic skills to their best advantage here. I picked this book up on a whim, knowing only her work from the New York Times, and I was not disappointed. Fabulous.
swa61 More than 1 year ago
I was born in 1961 - this was like reading a news-reel script of events that happened in my lifetime and that effected me personally. Thank you Gail Collins for writing this book
Anonymous 3 months ago
Collins does an excellent job of tracking how the role of how the role of women has changed over time. By starting in 1960 and following through the 2008 election, Collins allows the reader to travel through time and relive history alongside the women who made it. The author uses well known historical events to connect the women's movement to events the reader may already be aware of. Overall a very informative book that covers a very important topic in a way that is easy for the reader to understand and enjoy.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My mom bought me this book because she knows how strong my feminist viewpoints are and let me say, I love this book. Even though I have it in hardback and not as an ebook I would still recommend this to any female, young or old. This book will really make you appreciate the women you've heard little about and the women who made great changes through the course of history to get you where you are today. I highly recommend this book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I'm 72 and grew up in the 60s...everything Gail Collins writes about pertains to me. And it should to a whole lot of other women, older and younger. A reminder of where women were, where we are now, and where we need to go from here in our private and public lives. Highly readable, entertaining and educational, all rolled into one. Read this and enjoy!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Gail Collins weaves the story chroniogically to show us how indeed "everything changed" in the last 40 years, and with stories of everyday women and those famous and lauded. We were all involved and it changed all of us regardlessof our circumstances or politics. I am 57 and remember cutting class in high school to go see Gloria Steinam speak. While my life and views did not change that very day, there began an underlying current that molded me. I am unmarried, very successful professionally with a loving family and wide circle of friends. I am happy. If this were 1958 I would be pitied; today I am happy and envied in many ways. I have these women who went before me to thank for that. Well done, Gail Collins, for putting this incredible history and change into an interesting and very personal narritive.
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