Witch Boy (Witch Boy Series #1) [NOOK Book]

Overview

The spirit is willing...

Strange but true: I can move things with my mind. Even stranger, but just as true: Lately, I've been looking in the mirror and seeing a face I don't recognize. I've been knocking down trees and throwing boulders without touching them. And I've done some seriously heinous something to my girlfriend in this kind of ... I don't know ... freak out. I don't know what it was. I don't know if she's dead or alive.

You think I'm...

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Witch Boy (Witch Boy Series #1)

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Overview

The spirit is willing...

Strange but true: I can move things with my mind. Even stranger, but just as true: Lately, I've been looking in the mirror and seeing a face I don't recognize. I've been knocking down trees and throwing boulders without touching them. And I've done some seriously heinous something to my girlfriend in this kind of ... I don't know ... freak out. I don't know what it was. I don't know if she's dead or alive.

You think I'm scared that I'm melted in the head? You don't know the half of it. Melted in the bead would be a blessing, compared to this. I'm not afraid of being crazy. I'm afraid of being whatever I am.

What am I?

Soon after his seventeenth birthday, Marcus begins to see a face other than his own in the mirror and discovers that he has the power to move objects with his mind, but only when he and his mother move to a new town does he begin to understand his destiny as the Prince of the Forest.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Marcus has a special sense where he can wish people and objects to other locations. Tomorrow he is leaving, but he wants one last fling with his childhood friend and sweetheart, Jules. They go to the woods and, in the middle of The Act, Jules becomes a man and yet calls for Marcus in a distant voice. Marcus fights him to get to Jules. He runs to reach her and hears sirens. Another high school boy has driven into the river and everyone believes Jules was with him. Her body is never found. Marcus believes that somehow he did this to Jules. At his new home, a circle of friends that has special powers like his takes him in. He learns he is the youngest member of the Cern tribe and his quest is to propagate the tribe by mating with another member. Making love with someone outside the tribe, like he did with Jules, will result in unendurable pain. Talk of sex is very prominent in this book and Marcus is continually frustrated and asking questions that are vaguely answered. This is the first of a trilogy. 2002, Harper Tempest, Rose
VOYA
When seventeen-year-old Marcus Aurelius discovers that he is a witch, the message definitely does not arrive by owl post. He has noticed some strange changes lately, and he is certain that it is not puberty, unless the ability to throw cows across a field with one's mind has become a customary part of growing up. Marcus used to be a normal boy, obsessed with his computer and his girlfriend, Jules. The night before he is supposed to move to a new town, he and Jules plan to make love, but something goes horribly awry. Marcus awakens from a nightmare, Jules is gone, and his clothes are covered in blood. Arriving in Blackwater, a girl named Eartha delivers the news that Marcus is the son of the Celtic god Cern. To understand his powers, Marcus must find the one person he thought was dead—his father. Thanks to the Harry Potter phenomenon, books about the supernatural almost are guaranteed to fly off the shelf. Nothing, however, ensures their quality. This novel seeks to be for high school boys what Cate Tiernan's The Sweep series (Puffin/Penguin Putnam, 2001/VOYA Paperback Update, April 2001) and Isobel Birds Circle of Three books (Avon, 2001/VOYA Paperback Update, August 2001) are to girls, but Moon's first novel falls short of its mark. The first pages will test the limits of the hardiest reader with its confusing, affected melodrama. Characters are cardboard, the plot is predictable, and the gratuitous sex and violence are annoying. Stick with Bird and Teirnan, and refer interested boys to Stephen King and Anne Rice. VOYA CODES: 2Q 4P S (Better editing or work by the author might have warranted a 3Q; Broad general YA appeal; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12). 2002, HarperCollins,208p,
— Arlene Garcia
School Library Journal
Gr 8 Up-Marcus Aurelius is in a quandary. He's moving to a new town with his mom just as something dreadful happens to his girlfriend that he may or may not have caused. (Readers never find out here.) Some new mystical talents are budding inside him, but he's not sure he wants them. In his new town, Marcus meets some fellow students who already know him. His reputation has preceded him and his new "friends" are anxious to help him develop his powers. Marcus has to confront his feelings about his new abilities, while deciding whether or not to believe what everyone is saying about him. The book contains intense sexual situations and language, and the dialogue can be hard to follow. Some readers may become confused, even frustrated with the story, as it tends to jump around. The protagonist's knack of thinking and speaking metaphorically all the time can be exhausting. Nothing is resolved here; perhaps things will be if readers have the patience to wait for the rest of the series-if they care.-Julie E. Darnall, Chester County Library, Exton, PA Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061954818
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 6/9/2009
  • Series: Witch Boy Series
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 208
  • Sales rank: 407,324
  • Age range: 13 - 17 Years
  • File size: 570 KB

Meet the Author

Russell Moon's deep interest in Celtish magic and mythology compelled him to write Witch Boy, his first fantasy novel.
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Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

I am looking at myself, in the reflection of the still water in one of the many here-today-gone-tomorrow pools that appear in the woods. My woods.

Hands and knees sink into the damp earth at the edge of the small pool as I crouch lower, lower and lower to examine myself more closely. My bluetick hound, Chuck, is hard on my shoulder, he and his reflection every bit as confused by me as I am.

The frayed tips of my long black hair contact the water, and I stop. The reflective me and the actual one meld, a sort of liquid hair frame boxing us in together, stuck with each other. For moments, I cannot move.

This is no Narcissus here. I am not loving what I'm seeing, and would in fact be the happiest guy if I looked down and saw something else, someone else. I keep checking, every day, as I pass every reflective surface.

But I always find this face. And I ask again, "Who in hell is this?"

By the time I look around, I have no idea where my dog is. They are familiar woods, our woods, and Chuck could be in any part of them. Something happens, I guess, when I go looking, when I go thinking, when I go down there into reverie. I don't know what it is, but it upsets Chuck, and he's gone.

"Chuck," I call out, and hear my voice roll out, around, and back to me. Birds alight, critters skitter, but Chuck does not return.

I know he hears me. I hate it when he does this. He's being dramatic. Either that or he's getting laid.

"Chuck!" I bellow.

He has no sense, no discretion, no discrimination. My dog feels about sex the way most cats feel about killing: anything that moves.

"Chuck!"

I surprise myselfwith the intensity of my yell. He makes me get like this. It's not that he has to be obedient and stupid all the time like other dogs. We don't have that kind of relationship. It's well beyond that. We're more like brothers. It's like if your younger brother were going around having loads of sex before you ever even ...

"Chuuuuck!"

The entire woods shake with my rage. I squeeze my eyes shut, my fists pulled so tight my fingertips just might pop through the backs of my hands.

I open my eyes to see it actually happening, the trees trembling, pine needles and leaves parachuting to the ground, branches snapping.

One old maple, thirty yards ahead, finally gives up and falls with a cracking, snapping fanfare. Three younger trees are flattened underneath.

"Cool," I say, coolly. I used to scare myself when I did this kind of almighty crap. But you get used to it. What else can you do?

The dog yelps. He remains in hiding.

I am patient.

The tree quietly shifts, rustles, as if settling down into death. Only it's reversing. It comes up off the ground a foot, then three, then six, as if pushing itself up, then slaps back to earth.

I did that, you see. It's what I do.

The dog yelps again.

"I see a big boulder," I say out into the distance. "Chuck, would you like to see the big boulder?"

Chuck does not want to see the big boulder. He comes slinking out of the brush. He won't look at me as we resume our walk, to our place. First I scared him into the trees with my inexplicable behavior, then I scared him back out likewise.

This of course is totally unfair, but what isn't? It is not Chuck's fault that I am tense and frustrated. But it's not mine either.

"What was it this time, Chuck, you pervert? A chipmunk? A duck?"

It is not his fault, what is happening to me, to us. It is not his fault that we are not what we once were. We are not a boy and his dog. Haven't been for about six months now, since around when I turned seventeen, and things have gotten weirder and weirder. Things like not recognizing my own reflection. Things like knocking down trees and throwing two-ton rocks. Without even touching them.

You know, things like that.

And that is the extent of what I know.

There is more to know. You know there's got to be more to know.

So who does know?

Maybe Chuck. My best friend, my better me. The further I get from myself, from knowing myself, the more I feel I need him by my side. I have no explanation for this, I simply feel it.

But if he does know, he's not talking.

"Sorry," I say to him as we reach our spot. I crouch down, run my hand lightly over his flat, velvety head and make sure his eyes catch mine. "Sorry," I say.

He snorts, then circles around behind me and climbs on my back. I climb us up the tree.

This is as close as we get, these days, to rightness. We are sitting in our tree, in our woods. Like we do. We are above it all, away from it all, yet somehow in control of it all.

When we're up here, I immediately feel a different relationship with everything. I look across the woods, the fields, the nearby houses, and on a good day, across the far hilltops. And if I can see it, it is mine.

Like I said, I move things. With my mind. The rocks, boulders, rotting tree trunks in the woods below us.

Cows in the meadow beyond. I look at them, stare at them, think about them where they are and think about them someplace else. And there they go. Haven't you always wanted to do that? You have, of course...

Witch Boy. Copyright © by Russell Moon. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 22 )
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 22 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2002

    Good book, just not for people under 16

    I just finished this book, and I thought it was pretty good, but it had some curses and other mature things in it and I wouldnt recommend it for people under 16 years old.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 6, 2014

    Boy-centric paranormal.

    Wow, just came across this one while cruising my NOOK. I read this first book of the trilogy back when it came out in book form and loved it. Just imagine a teen boy going through hormones and angst...and then coming into some really scary power. Great trilogy for guy & girl readers.

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  • Posted January 10, 2011

    awesome!

    This novel is awesome! It is very short, only 130 pages, but very interesting attention grabbing. There are some frustrating moments, when no one will tell Marcus what is happening, but it gets better. The first person narrative is very well done. Marcus has a unique and interesting inner voice. There is violence. There are some vague sexual situations, but they all work for the novel, not against it. The cliffhanger ending is brutal and wonderful. I'm very glad the last two books in the trilogy are available. I will read them staight away.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 16, 2004

    Great story for young adult readers!

    I loved this book. It deals with relationships, mind games, and just being a normal teenager, (except for the powers Marcus has). I recommend this book to everybody who's into fantasy and books about magic!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 24, 2003

    One of my favorite books

    This book is definately my favorite book, I read it in just a few days. I wouldn't put an age limit on this book, but you would have to be mature person and not get freaked out easily to Witch Boy. If you are, well go out and get it right away!

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