Wuthering Heights

Wuthering Heights

4.2 52
by Emily Brontë
     
 

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ISBN-10: 1580493947

ISBN-13: 2901580493948

Pub. Date: 01/28/2005

Publisher: Prestwick House, Incorporated

Wuthering Heights, Emily Bronte's only novel, is one of the pinnacles of 19th century English literature. It's the story of Heathcliff, an orphan who falls inlove with a girl above his class, loses her, and devotes the rest of his life to wreaking revenge on her family.

Overview

Wuthering Heights, Emily Bronte's only novel, is one of the pinnacles of 19th century English literature. It's the story of Heathcliff, an orphan who falls inlove with a girl above his class, loses her, and devotes the rest of his life to wreaking revenge on her family.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2901580493948
Publisher:
Prestwick House, Incorporated
Publication date:
01/28/2005
Edition description:
New Edition

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations     viii
About Longman Cultural Editions     ix
About This Edition     xi
Introduction     xv
Table of Dates: The Life of Emily Bronte     xxvi
The Chronology of Wuthering Heights     xxx
Wuthering Heights     1
Volume 1     3
Volume 2     141
Contexts     299
Biographical     303
Biographical Sketch     303
Emily Bronte in Elizabeth Gaskell's The Life of Charlotte Bronte (1857)     308
Writings   Emily Bronte     313
from "Diary Papers" (1834-1845)     313
"The Cat" (translation) (1842)     319
Charlotte Bronte's Selection of Poems by Ellis Bell (1850)     320
Charlotte Bronte on Ellis Bell     329
from "Biographical Notice of Ellis and Acton Bell" (1850)     330
from "Editor's Preface" (1850)     335
Historical, Social, and Legal     339
Heathcliff and the Unsettled Classes     339
Nomads of City and Country     341
Henry Mayhew, from London Labour and the London Poor (1861)     341
Self-Made Men and Luddites     343
Samuel Smiles, from Self-Help (1859)     343
Women's Rights and Roles     348
Ellis Bell and Sarah Stickney Ellis     348
Sarah Stickney Ellis, from The Women of England, Their Social Duties and Domestic Habits (1839)     349
Harriet Martineau, from "On Female Education" (1823)     352
Wills, Women, and Property     355
Barbara Leigh Smith Bodichon, from A Brief Summary, in Plain Language, of the Most Important Laws Concerning Women (1854)     355
A Tale of Two Houses: Interiors and Servants     357
Interiors     358
John Ruskin, from "The Nature of Gothic," The Stones of Venice (1851-1853)     359
Domestic Servants     361
Isabella Beeton, from The Book of Household Management (1861)     362
Regional and Popular     366
Where Are the Brontes From?     366
Ireland, Heathcliff, and the Brontes     367
William Wright, from The Brontes in Ireland (1893)     368
Yorkshire: Regionalism, Dialect, and Ballads     374
Regionalism     374
Elizabeth Gaskell, from The Life of Charlotte Bronte (1857)     375
Dialect     377
Richard Blakeborough, from Wit, Character, Folklore and Customs of the North Riding of Yorkshire (1898)     377
Ballads      380
Anonymous, "The Ghaist's Warning" (1812)     382
Pilgrims to Haworth     387
Matthew Arnold, from "Haworth Churchyard, April 1855" (1877)     387
Claude Meeker, from "Haworth; Home of the Brontes" (1895)     390
Virginia Woolf, from "Haworth, November 1904" (1904)     393
Shifting Literary Honors and the Beaten Track     395
Critical and Artful     398
Reviews of Wuthering Heights, 1848-1851     399
from Douglas Jerrold's Weekly Newspaper (January 1848)     399
from Atlas (January 1848)     400
G. W. P[eck], from "Wuthering Heights," The American Review (June 1848)     401
[E. P. Whipple], from "Novels of the Season," North American Review (October 1848)     403
[George Henry Lewes], from The Leader (December 1850)     404
[Sydney Dobell], from Eclectic Review (February 1851)     405
Early Criticism     406
Algernon Charles Swinburne, from "Emily Bronte" (1883)     406
Angus M. MacKay, from The Brontes: Fact and Fiction (1897)     407
Mary A. Ward [Mrs. Humphry Ward], from "Introduction," Wuthering Heights, Haworth Edition (1900)     409
May Sinclair, from The Three Brontes (1912)     410
Virginia Woolf, from "Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights" (1916)      412
Sites and Resources on the Brontes     413
Exhibits     413
Selected Web sites     415
Adaptations and Translations     415
Performances     415
Film/Television Adaptations     417
Some Translations     418
Some Sequels, Pendants, and Biographical Fiction     422
Further Reading     425
General Resources and Biographical Studies     425
Popular Reception and Travels to Bronte Country     430
Selected Criticism Since 1995     430

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Wuthering Heights 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 52 reviews.
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I started reading this book and did not really know what to expect. I tried to come into it with an open mind since I am not much of reader. I think that Emily Bronte structured this book with sheer genius. For being her first and only book the structure is quite complex. I was a little overwhelmed in the first 5 or 6 chapters because it took a while to get use to the writing style of the book. The reading is fairly tough because of the time period it is set in; especially when a character named Joseph starts talking. I think that the characters are well represented are gone into in quite detail. It is sad that the characters that are immature, unstable, self-absorbed and hell-bent on revenge. This is to be considered one of the greatest love stories ever told. Ironically there is not much love exhibited throughout the novel from anyone. It is more of a tragedy than anything and if you are into tragic love stories and genius novel structure than this book would be for you.
Pat_McGrown More than 1 year ago
This book is very complex for an average person to read. The plot itself is interesting as towards the end you want to find out what happens. One strength that this story has is that you feel for the characters that are in the story. A great book is one that the reader can zone in on a character and understand the emotions that the character is going through. The main characters Heathcliff and Catherine are very relatable. Women can feel for Catherine as she struggles to find her true love and tries to find the right man. Ultimately, though, she picks the wrong one. Men can feel for Heathcliff as well. He is a guy who struggles to find success but ends up finding it, even if he takes a toll getting there. One negative that I feel the book has is that it is very hard to read. For example, in the first five chapters, the author was very descriptive to the point where she was overly descriptive. Also, at certain chapters, it is hard to figure out sometimes who is talking as pronouns were used more than proper nouns. All in all, if you like reading books, then this book could be your cup of coffee but it you are a casual reader, you might get bored and confused with this book quick.
JulJH More than 1 year ago
It was a difficult book to get into at first to be honest. Not an easy read for me until I got past the first couple of chapters, not something I strongly favor in my choice of reading. As the story started to develop though, I found it a very active and intriguing novel, something I truly do love when it comes to books. I think Wuthering Heights is a very good discussion book, as I read it was easier to understand while discussing and interacting with the character as they developed through others understanding. One character Joseph was very hard to understand, he spoke in a broken English type of slang, but the version of the book that I had, actually had a notes to the text portion to the novel which explain what Joseph said. I really appreciated that assistant to the book. All in all I really did like reading Wuthering Heights, I thought it was a great story and loved how it was pulling me in more and more. It is very much a mystery novel, trying to figure out who loves who, and which children belongs to which couple, what Heathcliff will do next, and why certain characters act how they do. If you like an intelligently written novel that keeps you guessing, Wuthering Heights is the novel for you!
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Shrew More than 1 year ago
I read Wuthering Heights in high school, and when I saw the paperback I wanted to read it again. I enjoyed it even more years later. I suggest revisiting books that were required reading in school.
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