Zooma

Zooma

4.0 3
by John Paul Jones
     
 
While seldom recognized as such, John Paul Jones was the glue that held Led Zeppelin together, the true musician in a band of battling egos. As such, when Zep crash-landed, he walked away unscathed to soldier on with artistically compelling, commercially marginal projects with fellow travelers such as the Butthole Surfers and

Overview

While seldom recognized as such, John Paul Jones was the glue that held Led Zeppelin together, the true musician in a band of battling egos. As such, when Zep crash-landed, he walked away unscathed to soldier on with artistically compelling, commercially marginal projects with fellow travelers such as the Butthole Surfers and Diamanda Galas. Well, his first bona fide solo album won't disappoint those who've come to expect the unexpected from Jones, as he delivers a freeform-and-ferocious instrumental set that's spiked with intoxicating elements. Jones tips his hand from cut one, an acid-laced doozy punctuated by torrents of guitar noise courtesy of Butthole Paul Leary. While Jones certainly delivers plenty of his immediately identifiable bass playing -- on four-, eight-, and ten-string models, no less -- he also straps on a variety of other "axes," including guitar, synthesizer, and organ (the pivotal instrument on the ornate blues number "Snake Eyes"). Despite the lack of vocals and lyrics, there's no mistaking the sly, smart attitude Jones brings to the party on tracks like "Goose" and "The Smile of Your Shadow." So move over, rover...and let the bassist take over.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
John Paul Jones stayed quiet for years after the disbandment of Led Zeppelin, performing the occasional arranging, soundtrack, or production gig, or collaborating with such avant garde musicians as Diamanda Galas. Throughout it all, he never released a full-fledged solo album -- until the fall of 1999, when he unleashed Zooma. Anyone that was following who Jones worked with in the '90s -- including Galas, the Butthole Surfers, and R.E.M. -- shouldn't be entirely surprised by the depth, range, and gleeful strangeness on Zooma, but those expecting something like Led Zeppelin IV will be disappointed. That's not to say that there's no Zeppelin here at all. Jones was a key member of Zep, contributing heavily to their sonic majesty and experimental bent, all things that are apparent throughout the album. The difference is, Jones frees himself and his collaborators -- including Paul Leary and members of the London Symphony Orchestra -- to push the envelope hard by making Zooma an instrumental effort. Freed from the boundaries of songs, but not compositions, Jones crafts a series of nine truly impressive songs, blending together blues, worldbeat, heavy rock, jazz, and the avant-garde into a distinctive, unpredictable, and original sound. It may have been a long wait to receive the first solo album from Jones, but the end result makes it all worthwhile.

Product Details

Release Date:
09/14/1999
Label:
Discipline Us
UPC:
0633367990921
catalogNumber:
679909

Tracks

Album Credits

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Zooma 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I think this is a great album. JPJ does in this album what I think artists today should be trying to do: he is pushing the music forward. That is not to say that ever track on here is a masterpiece, but there are a few great numbers. This album contains shades of all music but is unique in its own right - something Zeppelin always managed to do. The best example of this is the song ''Snake Eyes'' which has elements of blues, 60s rock, hard rock, and classical elements mixed in. All elements seem to blend perfectly. I don't feel that Jonesy just threw violins for something novel, they really fit, they complement rather than detract from the song. Whereas everyone has the right to their own opinion it may be of some help to explain who will like this album. As always stated anyone looking for Led Zeppelin X is going to be let down. There are no pop songs on this album either. Anyone who is a major Zep/Jones fan will probably enjoy this album. Also if you are into more independent type music this may be for you. It is hard to describe exactly what it sounds like, but this is full of energy. It may take a few listens to fully appreciate, but come into it open and check it out.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Zooma is not an easy album and I think that's what JPJ intended. Don't go looking for Zeppelin, sure, there are lots of Zep motifs in the music, but, that's only natural. My advice is to don your headphones,whack the volume up to 11 and sit back! Not all the tracks are clasics and maybe over-indulgent, but, the gems stand out and the sheer power of the music swamps you. It's not for the faint-hearted, but, give it a try and take notice and give JPJ the applause he deserves for this album. And remember don't expect Zeppelin!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a very good album. It showcases Jones' great musicianship, and firm handle of the bass. It is all instrumental, and John Paul not only shows off his mastery of the bass, but his great studio arranging. Bravo Jonesy!