Achieving Your Potential As A Photographer: A Creative Companion and Workbook

Achieving Your Potential As A Photographer: A Creative Companion and Workbook

by Harold Davis

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Overview

Achieving Your Potential As A Photographer: A Creative Companion and Workbook by Harold Davis

Coming from the perspective that true inspiration and great image making are at the core of any high-level photographic endeavour, Achieving Your Potential as a Digital Photographer presents an organized and cohesive plan for kickstarting creativity, and then taking the resulting work into the real world. The ideas presented have been formulated by Harold Davis over many years working as a creative artist and award-wining photographer, and in the celebrated workshops he has developed and led all around the world. These concepts are presented with accompanying exercises so that readers can put them into everyday practice as well as workbook pages bound into the book for note taking and journaling. This book will enrich your photographic practice whether the goal is simply to enrich your photography or to make money from your work.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781138826366
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Publication date: 08/05/2015
Pages: 256
Sales rank: 1,210,817
Product dimensions: 9.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.90(d)

About the Author

Harold Davis is an internationally-known digital artist and award-winning professional photographer. He is the author of many photography books. In addition to his activity as a bestselling book author, Harold Davis is a Moab Master printmaker and a Zeiss Lens Ambassador.

Table of Contents

    1. Becoming a More Creative Photographer; 2. Achieving Your Goals; 3. What do you really want?; 4. Contrary to what you may have heard, it’s not all about marketing; 5. The tools we live by in the Internet era; 6. Workbook/Activity section


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    Achieving Your Potential As A Photographer: A Creative Companion and Workbook 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
    FRINGEINDEPENEDENTREVIEW More than 1 year ago
    DonWatson More than 1 year ago
    It has become a habit to greet a new photography book by Harold Davis with great anticipation. Being a confirmed follower of his work and a past reviewer of his last four books, I am pleased to delve into a review of his most recent book, “Achieving Your Potential As a Photographer.” Being a photographer is a solo craft. Although you may be around people taking individual or group portraits, your craft is practiced and developed entirely by you. To move you out of the realm of taking snap shots and into the realm of art that is the true challenge facing a photographer. To connect with your creative-side and nurture it to a level of maturity can be a daunting task. Enter Harold Davis’ book and you are not alone. If you are not naturally creative or at a roadblock in your creativity, with this book Davis writes a prescription to help you develop your creative talent and/or jumpstart your creative engine. This prescription is a process, albeit a roadmap to help you succeed. The book is a combination guide and workbook. The guide explains the key steps in establishing or fine-tuning your vision with the companion workbook section providing terrific exercises to help you develop and refine your photographic voice. Finding one’s photographic voice is the key and it is the foundation for providing your perspective in the images you make. The area the Davis specifically emphasizes is the depth of an image. For an image to have impact, it must convey a story, it must convey an emotion. Without those two ingredients, the image is routine and uninspired. Davis brilliantly explains the three dimensions of a photograph with emphasis on the third, emotion. To achieve you potential you need to be self-evaluative. You need to be open to new ides, and also willing to take risks. Photography should be fun, but it can also be an eloquent voice for you in telling a story that reels in the viewer. By channeling your creativity and enunciating it through your photographic vision is what defines you as a photographer; whether your focus is on landscapes, portraiture, street photography, etc. The value of this book is that it serves as a companion and helper as you look to progress as a photographer. As stated before, photography is a solo act, but having this book at your side will give you the confidence in knowing you are not truly alone
    CJ_Glynn More than 1 year ago
    "Achieving Your Potential As a Photographer: A Photographer’s Creative Companion and Workbook" by Harold Davis is not your typical photography “how to” book. Rather than stressing technique and delineating specific recipes to make great images, Davis teaches readers to look inside themselves to identify and overcome “resistances” that keep them from achieving their potential as a photographer. In this book, Davis helps readers move from just capturing images to making personal works of art. The book takes the reader on a journey. Not a physical journey from point A to point B, but rather a mental journey to explore who you are, what you want to be as a photographer and how to get there — wherever “there” is for you. The book asks the reader for self-reflection, and if the reader does indeed do so, he will emerge better off for it. Davis starts out with what he calls “A Roadmap to Success.” He encourages readers to “Establish a baseline,” “Go for it,” “Improve,“ and “Do it again.” This, of course, is a simplification of “Plan, Do, Study, Act” that was made famous by Dr. W. Edwards Deming, the quality control. This is a tried and true method for improvement of almost any process, and as Davis advocates, it should work for advancing your photographic skills as well. The book is divided into five main sections, “In The Beginning,” “Unleash Your Imagination,” “Becoming a More Creative Photographer,” “Technique Matters,” and “From Photo to World” with short chapters in each section. In general, the chapters are concise — from two to ten pages — allowing readers to consume them without committing too much time. The text is supplemented by a myriad of Davis’ images, from his iconic high key flowers and Parisian cityscapes to natural scenes of Japan and abstract, impressionist creations. Davis’ own story accompanies many of the images, giving you valuable insight into the mind of a professional photographer. Rather than be juxtaposed with the material they reference, the exercises are relegated to a workbook at the rear of the book. The exercises serve to expend readers’ minds, giving them inspiration, ideas, exercises, and challenges. For many, the main take-aways from the book will be more personal than photographic: • How do you objectively rate yourself today? Be honest. • What’s stopping you from achieving your goals? Figure it out, write it down and make a plan to remove the “resistance.” • Don’t be afraid to be creative; don’t be afraid to make a mistake. • Listen to your inner voice by understanding what moves you and why you care about those things. • Work should be play; you can’t do great things when you’re not having a good time. It is obvious that this work (“work” meaning both “this book” and “photography in general”) is highly personal to Davis. In "Achieving Your Potential As a Photographer," he comes as close to baring his soul and sharing his innermost thoughts about photography this side of a therapist’s couch. Davis’ passion for photography comes through, as does his sincere desire to help readers “be the best photographer you can be.” Intermediate or professional photographers who have already mastered the technical side of their craft will further their knowledge of photography, and of themselves, by reading (and then re-reading) "Achieving Your Potential As a Photographer" by Harold Davis.