And Then It's Spring

And Then It's Spring

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Overview

And Then It's Spring by Julie Fogliano, Erin E. Stead

Following a snow-filled winter, a young boy and his dog decide that they've had enough of all that brown and resolve to plant a garden. They dig, they plant, they play, they wait . . . and wait . . . until at last, the brown becomes a more hopeful shade of brown, a sign that spring may finally be on its way.

Julie Fogliano's tender story of anticipation is brought to life by the distinctive illustrations Erin E. Stead, recipient of the 2011 Caldecott Medal. This title has Common Core connections.

And Then It's Spring is one The Washington Post's Best Kids Books of 2012.

One of Kirkus Reviews' Best Children's Books of 2012

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781596436244
Publisher: Roaring Brook Press
Publication date: 02/14/2012
Pages: 32
Sales rank: 217,061
Product dimensions: 8.60(w) x 10.60(h) x 0.60(d)
Lexile: AD600L (what's this?)
Age Range: 4 - 7 Years

About the Author

Julie Fogliano has spent her entire life reading children's books. Now she stays up way too late writing her own books while eating cereal. She lives in the Hudson Valley with her husband and their two boys. They make her very tired, but give her lots of good ideas. And Then It's Spring is her first book.

Erin E. Stead first met Julie Fogliano while working together in a New York City bookstore. Today she lives in a 100-year-old barn in Ann Arbor, Michigan, with her husband, Philip, who is an author and illustrator, and with whom she co-created A Sick Day For Amos McGee, winner of the 2011 Caldecott Medal, for Roaring Brook Press. Erin creates her illustrations using woodblock printing techniques and pencil.

Reading Group Guide

Signs of Spring

Take a walk outside and talk about the changes that take place from winter to spring. What do you hear, feel, see, and smell in the different seasons?

Poetry

Every April, at the beginning of springtime, we celebrate National Poetry Month. There are lots of different styles of poems. One style is an acrostic poem. Let's write an acrostic poem about spring. To start your poem, put the letters that spell out SPRING down the side of your paper. Then go back to each letter and think of a word, phrase, or sentence that starts with that letter and describes the season of spring. We gave an example using the letter G below. You get to fill in the other letters! Remember that this style of poetry doesn't need to rhyme. Be creative and share your poem!

S ..............................................................................

P ..............................................................................

R ..............................................................................

I...............................................................................

N ..............................................................................

G reen, all around you have green...............................

Gardening

We also celebrate Earth Day every April. You may already have a garden at your school or in your community. If not...

Grow a Garden!

Materials needed: Styrofoam cups, soil, water, sunlight, seeds (your choice), Popsicle sticks, and plant markers.

Follow these steps:

Step 1: Pick a seed to plant.

Step 2: Fill Styrofoam cup half way with soil.

Step 3: Use the Popsicle stick to dig a hole in the soil.

Step 4: Write the name of the plant on the plant marker.

Step 5: Color the plant marker, cut it out, and glue to the Popsicle stick.

Step 6: Plant the seed and cover it with soil, following the directions on the seed packet.

Step 7: Water the seed, following the directions on the seed packet.

Step 8: Place the plant marker in the soil, standing straight up.

Step 9: Expose the cup to sunlight, and continue to water.

Step 10: Wait patiently for the plant to grow and blossom.

Step 11: Take the fully grown plant home to share!

Customer Reviews

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And Then It's Spring 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a wonderful book. My 2.5 year old really likes it. The illustrations are beautiful and the story is poetic and full of subtle humor; it is almost more a poem than a story. The book describes exactly how it feels to wait for spring a that seemingly takes forever to come, and all is brown until it is green. I respectfully disagree with other reviewers: The seeds planted are shown to sprout at the end (the dog buries a bone, the rabbit waits for the carrot seeds etc.) and withstand the 'dangers' of stomping bears and birds. The pictures tell a story as well in many details (what is under the earth, the progress of spring).
Autumn2 More than 1 year ago
When K picked this book out I thought it would be more a good story getting us ready for Spring. The book seemed dull to me and maybe that was because it wasn't brightly colored and I am use to reading books that are. Plus the boy never looked happy. This little boy is planting seeds and waiting for them to grow but nothing happens until later on when spring comes. I do like how the little boy had to wait and wait for his plants to grow as plants take some time. It is a great way to learn patience. K liked it but I could tell he wasn't truly liking the book. I think maybe because he was waiting to see the different things the boy planted and we didn't see them it is more of a picture of what he was planting along with grass surrounding the dirt mound. 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A poetically told story of hope and transformation. It's a lovely book both in language and illustrations. One of my new favorite picture books.
grapfrut More than 1 year ago
Nice illustrations, but story does not really go anywhere...It's brown, brown, brown, then green. Neither I nor my five-year old found it interesting.