Anya and the Power Crystal

Anya and the Power Crystal

by N. A. Cauldron

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Overview

Now that everyone knows Anya can perform magic, she's the number one enemy of the Queen of Cupola. But instead of being punished, she and her friends are being sent on a mission to find a lost treasure. Hmm... Well that's odd. Anya thinks so too. In an effort to learn just what exactly the Queen has in store for them, Anya and her friends discover something more deadly than they could have ever imagined.



From lost colonies to fairies and even the fabled skinwalker, Anya, Taika, and Gevin find out what really lies outside the walls of Cupola. Will they survive?

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780996718929
Publisher: Wiggling Pen Publishing
Publication date: 06/20/2016
Series: Cupolian Series , #2
Pages: 318
Product dimensions: 5.25(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.71(d)
Age Range: 9 - 12 Years

About the Author

N. A. Cauldron grew up on the outskirts of modern Cupola. As a young child, she enjoyed listening to the tales told of Cupolian's history. This ultimately led to a successful career as a research historian and her recent authorship of historical fiction. She is an avid herbologist, and spends her free time hunting out and collecting rare herbs for her potion making. She is especially fond of the snaggled tooth humpmoss, and has been known to spend weeks at a time on fungal expeditions.

Although Ms Cauldron is currently spending her time attempting to acquiesce to earth's society, her roots and permanent home will always remain in Cupola. She is currently studying earthly children's literature and plans to contribute to its volumes upon finishing her historical works on the Cupolian time period known as the Magical Revolution.

Mikey Brooks is a small child masquerading as an adult. On occasion you'll catch him dancing the funky chicken, singing like a banshee, and pretending to have never grown up. He is an award-winning author and illustrator of five middle-grade books and several more picture books. Mikey loves to daydream with four kiddos and explore the worlds that only the imagination of children can create

Table of Contents

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

ONE
The Skinwalker

TWO
The Assignment Post

THREE
The Trouble with Boys

FOUR
Some Plans Are so Bad, They Smell

FIVE
The Queen's Strategy

SIX
The Escape

SEVEN
Monstrous Owl-Women

EIGHT
The Village

NINE
The Historian

TEN
Taika's Library

ELEVEN
The Mourning Ceremony

TWELVE
Joining Forces

THIRTEEN
Magic is Relative

FOURTEEN
The Fairy Incident

FIFTEEN
Whose Wand is Whose?

SIXTEEN
The Dwarven City

SEVENTEEN
The Hidden Cavern

EIGHTEEN
Journey to the Above

NINETEEN
The Treaty

TWENTY
Osmoglobs

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Anya and the Power Crystal 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Richard_Bunning More than 1 year ago
This is a really good book for the ‘between years’ reader and younger adolescents. Well, so says I, from the distance of my 60s and many years from having even the connection of children of such ages. I enjoyed delving into Cauldron’s fantasy adventure, with its traditional fight between generally righteous good and the forces of evil. The writing is exuberant, pacey, entertaining; surely a reflection of the author’s own joy in the telling. The plot is moved along without delaying information dumps, telling us just enough to paint the required pictures. I genuinely felt that Cauldron easily puts herself in young shoes. This is the second in series, and though I haven’t read the first book I had no difficulties with the story or the interesting range of mainly adolescent major characters. The fantasy elements were a nice mix of stock-in trade fantasy and material original to the author’s mind. There is loads of potential for at very least the completing of a trilogy, with plenty of unanswered plot twists, without over-treading too many familiar paths. I see no reason why this shouldn’t build into a well followed, long series. I would have loved reading about Anya’s world as a child, and perhaps especially having it read to me as my interest in fantasy worlds lagged some way behind my reading ability. The emphasis on a strong female heroine, sorry I’m old enough that I still struggle with the use of a non-gender specific hero, is very much the trend. That is a clear reflection of the empowerment of women throughout all the major strands of modern society and culture. Cauldron’s writing is very much of the ‘Queendom’, with the female protagonist balancing the best of, with the worst of gender. That is something of a relief, running as it does against the grain of so much modern writing, even though the negatives of gender are mainly in the form of the traditional wicked witch. I am very pleased to say that some of the boys are written with real individuality as well. In short, there is balance enough that young males will find characters to dream through rather than simply of. This is definitely a ‘Hermione Granger’ rather than a ‘Harry Potter’ story, however, Cauldron keeps a Rowlingesk balance in her Queendom. I’m sure that the greatest part of Rowling’s success is her ability to make all children, um- and grown-up child, feel that given another time and space that they could be a character in her fictitious worlds. One thing I like about my vision of Anya is that she is ‘actually’ a realistic role model, if that makes any sense at all in a fantasy book. I mean of course, that she isn’t either impossibly beautiful or talented. She is just Anya, from the next house down the street, with typical parents, and a mixed range of friends. Wand and a bit of intuition aside, she is just one in a crowd, like just about any of us in the real world. She sometimes fails to measure up, gets her hands dirty, makes a fool of herself, fails to fit in; just like everyone else. I will look out in the hope of reading a few reviews from the target audience, to see if Cauldron has hit the nail as well as I think she has. After all, it is children, not life-blunted old adults that are the best guide to the writing of young people’s fiction. This book perhaps needs a bit more editing in places, but yes, this is good storytelling of a fantasy kind. What comes next out of the Cauldron?
Amys_Bookshelf_Reviews More than 1 year ago
Magical! Absolutely Magical. Magic is one of my favorite words, so I do not use the word "magical" lightly. It can mean different things to different people. I thoroughly enjoyed this book, and yes, it was about magic, but there is something more deep to the plot than just Anya being sent on a mission from the queen and performing magic. The story was very well-written and gripping. The author took great care in writing this story and performing magic with the journey and twists that any one who loves a good "magic" story, for everyone young and young at heart.