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An Autobiography: The Story of My Experiments with Truth
     

An Autobiography: The Story of My Experiments with Truth

4.6 5
by Mohandas Gandhi
 

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The first edition of Gandhiji's Autobiography was published in two volumes, Vol. I in 1927 and Vol. II in 1929. The original in Gujarati which was priced at Re. 1/- has run through five editions, nearly 50,000 copies having been sold. The price of the English translation (only issued in library edition) was prohibitive for the Indian reader, and a cheap edition has

Overview

The first edition of Gandhiji's Autobiography was published in two volumes, Vol. I in 1927 and Vol. II in 1929. The original in Gujarati which was priced at Re. 1/- has run through five editions, nearly 50,000 copies having been sold. The price of the English translation (only issued in library edition) was prohibitive for the Indian reader, and a cheap edition has long been needed.

It is now being issued in one volume. The translation, as it appeared serially in Young India, had, it may be noted, the benefit of Gandhiji's revision. It has now undergone careful revision, and from the point of view of language, it has had the benefit of careful revision by a revered friend, who, among many other things, has the reputation of being an eminent English scholar. Before undertaking the task, he made it a condition that his name should on no account be given out. I accept the condition. It is needless to say it heightens my sense of gratitude to him.

Chapters XXIX-XLIII of Part V were translated by my friend and colleague Pyarelal during my absence in Bardoli at the time of the Bardoli Agrarian Inquiry by the Broomfield Committee in 1928-29.

Mahadev Desai, 1940.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940016754437
Publisher:
Unforgotten Classics
Publication date:
11/02/2014
Series:
Unforgotten Classics , #1
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
1,148,215
File size:
516 KB

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An Autobiography: The Story of My Experiments with Truth 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book must be read in context or else the reader will be disappointed. It is not the best book to read if you want to learn about Gandhi. It isn't much of an 'autobiography' in a typical sense. Gandhi doesn't directly cover the main events of his life that we know him today for. There is very little treatment about his non-violence movement and the protest marches. If you want to learn about the life of Gandhi, reading this book will leave you unfulfilled. For that, you're better off starting with Louis Fischer's 'Gandhi: His Life and Message for the World'. But Gandhi's Autobiography shows the reader how absolutely honest and humble he was. Gandhi exposes his idiosyncrasies, quirks, and his odd beliefs to anyone who cares to read. He completely downplays himself and his accomplishments by not writing about them and spends most of the pages dwelling on his faults, personal inner struggles, mundane aspects of his life, and strange experiments in diet. This is the closest anyone can get to glimpsing Gandhi's steam of consciousness and the ramblings of his mind.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
The younger generation is growing up with the news of war, violence, bombs, and missiles. They should know that non-violence was the only method used to free India from the colonial rule.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Gandhi's life is an open book. His thoughts on non-violence, truth, and perseverance are examples to whole mankind irrespective race, creed, nationality and gender. He exemplifies simple life and is an inspiration to one and all. His bravery needs no armies, guns, or bombs. Truth is his only weapon and the mighty British Empire crumbles. His love for people for all peoples and life is unprecedented. He says 'A nation's greatness is measured by the way it treats its animals'