Blood and Sand

Blood and Sand

by C. V. Wyk

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Overview

Blood and Sand by C. V. Wyk

FORGED IN BATTLE...
FROM THE DUST OF THE ARENA...
A LEGEND WILL RISE

The action-packed tale of a 17-year-old warrior princess and a handsome gladiator who dared take on the Roman Republic—and gave rise to the legend of Spartacus...

For teens who love strong female protagonists in their fantasy and historical fiction, Blood and Sand is a stirring, yet poignant tale of two slaves who dared take on an empire by talented debut author C. V. Wyk.

Roma Victrix. The Republic of Rome is on a relentless march to create an empire—an empire built on the backs of the conquered, brought back to Rome as slaves.

Attia was once destined to rule as the queen and swordmaiden of Thrace, the greatest warrior kingdom the world had seen since Sparta. Now she is a slave, given to Xanthus, the Champion of Rome, as a sign of his master’s favor. Enslaved as a child, Xanthus is the preeminent gladiator of his generation.

Against all odds, Attia and Xanthus form a tentative bond. A bond that will spark a rebellion. A rebellion that threatens to bring the Roman Republic to its end—and gives rise to the legend of Spartacus...

The story continues in Fire and Ash, coming soon from Tor Teen.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780765380098
Publisher: Tom Doherty Associates
Publication date: 01/16/2018
Pages: 320
Sales rank: 162,723
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.40(h) x 1.20(d)
Age Range: 13 - 17 Years

About the Author

C. V. WYK graduated from Vanderbilt University with a BA in English Literature and European History. Blood and Sand is her first novel. Born in Los Angeles, California, she now lives in Maryland. Look for her online on Twitter and Tumblr.

Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER 1

They called them slaves.

In the shadow of the Coliseum, through the paved streets of Rome, armed guards dragged them by the neck. Rusted iron shackles cut at their wrists and ankles. Each labored breath was fouled by the bitter stench of the city. Old and new blood darkened the rope that bound them together. Clumps of hair, torn fingernails, and other bits were trapped in the heavy, twisted strands. It was a rope that had been used many times before.

A crowd of dusty citizenry parted to let them pass, urged along by the guards and watchmen flanking the slaves on their walk to the auction block.

Twenty-one women in total, and they all averted their eyes, trembled with terror. All but one.

At the very end of the line, a slight figure lifted her head and stared around her, her gaze steady, penetrating. The dirt and mud that streaked her face wasn't enough to hide her disgust. She knew what was going to happen to her and the others. She knew the warped rules by which the Romans played. Patricians and plebeians. Masters and slaves. They all filled their roles without exception. It didn't matter who she was sold to, just that she would be sold. She would be bought, and she would be paid for, and she would be a slave.

She tried to summon calming pictures of her home — the salty air that drummed against the walls of her father's tent, the alternating calm and fury of the Aegean, the stormy gray of her mother's eyes. But the pictures quickly turned to images of carnage and violence.

She'd been a warrior once, and free. Now she was the only one left, the last Thracian the world would never know. She wondered if history would remember the genocide of the Maedi, the annihilation of her people.

Doubtful, she thought. History only serves the winner.

Roma victrix.

She knew she didn't have the luxury of denial — not if she was going to survive. So when the bloodstained rope pulled her forward with a sharp jerk, she focused instead on her training and her discipline and managed to remain steady.

"Keep moving," the guard behind her grumbled.

Gripping her rope with bleeding fingers, she spat into the sand and walked on.

When she was young, her father, Sparro — swordlord of the legendary Maedi and war-king of Thrace — shot a barbed arrow into the heavens. The lives of his wife and unborn son had been claimed in childbirth, and brimming with grief, he forswore his people's gods. In a single night, he'd lost everything. Everything except for his young daughter, and in spite of his sorrow and resentment, he called her to his side.

It was the first time in her memory that all of their people were gathered together. Though their villages were separated by miles of mountain and field, all of Thrace stood as one that day — a proud mass of thousands upon thousands, stretching along the unforgiving coastline of the Aegean. They waited to see if their king would defy the gods one more time. To the east, the sea waited, too, silent and still. Not a single white wave crashed against the rocks below.

The crowning sun glinted off a pendant cradled in King Sparro's palm: finely wrought silver molded into the shape of a falcon in flight. The bird's bright wings spread wide, every feather carved in stunning detail. Its talons clutched undulating waves, and in place of its heart sat a large, clear stone that blazed in the dawn light.

Thracians of old called the pendant zhimanteia — "fire of the immortals" — a jewel meant for the swordlord's heir, the crown prince.

A serving woman brought forward a needle and a length of thread, and King Sparro himself made quick, neat stitches, fastening the pendant onto a new cloak. Then he draped the wool across his daughter's thin shoulders so that the pendant rested heavily against her heart.

Even heavier were the words he spoke next.

"I name Attia, my daughter."

Only a moment of silence passed before Crius, Sparro's first captain, raised his sword into the air and cried out the child's name. "Attia!"

It was a testament to their loyalty and their love that, without hesitation, all of the people took up the cry. And then as one, ten thousand honored soldiers of Thrace — Maedi warriors all — fell to their knees before the girl. The red of their cloaks spread out like a sea of blood.

Attia became her father's heir that day, the first future queen and swordmaiden of Thrace, destined to rule the greatest warrior kingdom the world had seen since ancient Sparta.

She was seven years old.

Now, ten years later, the once–crown princess found herself bound at the end of the line of new slaves. A fresh piece of meat up for auction, paraded onto a rotting wood platform in the middle of a small plaza. The twenty-one bound women were strangers to each other, all dressed in various shades of filth. At the opposite end of the line from Attia, one woman began to sob. Her shoulders shook with despair as the merchant gripped the back of her neck, shoved her forward, and began the bidding.

The Republic had conquered nearly half of the known world, its rule reaching from the western coast of Germanica to the eastern jungles of Siam. Even the dialects of Thrace shared much with the Latin Vulgate — the common tongue of the Republic. But at that moment, Attia wished it didn't because she understood the merchant's words all too well. "Who will give one denarius for this one? She is strong yet. Look." He slapped the woman's hip. "Pair her with your largest field worker, and she could breed two or three more, easily."

Bile rose in Attia's throat.

The woman he was talking about became rigid with terror. Her eyes flicked back and forth like those of a wounded animal, never once settling as the voices around her rose.

There were at least four dozen people in the crowd, all waving their hands and shouting their bids with enthusiasm. It wasn't often that an auction of foreign women like this took place, and the bidding didn't last for very long. Silver changed hands, the rope was cut, and the woman at the end of the line was dragged away by a middle-aged man in a blue tunic.

Attia was so tired, so full of rage for her own circumstances that she couldn't find the energy to pity the woman. She just stared at the soft line of her bared shoulder until she disappeared, barely even recognizing the fact that the other woman was real.

The nature of the sale became clear soon enough. The women who wept and showed fear were bought by the sadists in the crowd — the ones who enjoyed broken things. The women who looked dry-eyed and defiant were claimed for the brothels. The oldest women were bought by the few female patricians present, probably to clean floors or serve food.

Then, at the very end, Attia's turn came. She stood alone on the planks. There was still a large crowd gathered, despite the other women having already been sold. Attia tried to school her face to look as benign and uninteresting as possible though her blood boiled with contempt.

"And finally," the merchant said, "we come to the prize of the day — a true Thracian beauty. She —"

Before the merchant could say another word, the shouting began, echoing up against the clay walls surrounding the alley. Most of the bidders offered increasing amounts of money, while others tried to sweeten the deal with promises of horses or trades of other slaves. It seemed that everyone wanted the exotic girl from across the Aegean, the first Thracian woman to be captured in nearly a decade.

Only one man stayed silent as he watched from a shadowy corner of the alley. His white hair was cropped short, his mouth pinched into a thin line. His clothing was simple and unadorned but obviously expensive; the silk of his robe shimmered even in the shade. Beside him stood another man, this one dark and hard-muscled. He wore a loose blue tunic with wide sleeves that didn't reach his elbows. His eyes swept over and around the crowd, ever watchful.

"Eighty denarii!" a fat patrician shouted, licking his lips.

It was the highest bid yet, but the merchant waved his hands wildly over the crowd. "Is there a counteroffer?"

The old man in the corner carefully regarded Attia with cold blue eyes before speaking. "Five hundred denarii," he said, keeping his gaze on Attia's face.

The fat patrician sputtered. "Five hundred — you can't be serious!"

"Five hundred denarii," the man repeated, "and let that be the end of it."

The merchant beamed and sent a prayer of thanks to all the gods he could name. "Sold! Well bought, Timeus. Well bought!"

The fat patrician tried to argue again, but the auction was over. The other bidders reluctantly dispersed, grumbling as they went. The merchant waited for Timeus and his bodyguard to approach before saying, "I was almost certain Marius was going to challenge you."

Timeus looked unfazed. "He's too cheap to challenge me."

"She is well worth it," the merchant continued. "Young, spirited, in perfect health, and — as I wrote to you — I have it on excellent authority that she was not defiled after her capture. She is absolutely pure."

Timeus smiled, the calm expression nearly transforming his pinched face. He looked almost kind, until the smile tightened into a cold, harsh line. He tossed a heavy pouch at the merchant, a dismissal as much as a payment. Then to his bodyguard, he said, "Take her, Ennius. She has a job to do."

The merchant could barely contain his glee. He was glad to be rid of the stubborn whelp and thrilled with the small fortune he'd made off her sale. She hadn't stopped struggling since the moment of her capture, so he had kept her tightly shackled and bound for the journey to the city. The merchant sneered as he removed the iron that bound Attia's wrists and ankles. "Good luck, little Thracian."

For the first time in two weeks, Attia flexed her tightened limbs, pain and relief surging together.

The bodyguard reached out a dark, scarred hand to take hold of the rope still hanging loosely around her neck. "Steady, girl," he said. "Relax."

Relax? Attia would have laughed if her throat didn't feel like it had been stuffed with sand. Instead, she looked away from the bodyguard and took in her surroundings.

The little plaza was nearly empty by then. The windows and doors were covered and closed. The alley was narrow, and the vigiles — the watchmen charged with keeping law and order within the city limits — were hardly being vigilant. The nearest one was more than a hundred yards away and preoccupied with a prostitute flashing her wares. Attia saw it all in a single breath. The distance. The positioning.

The opportunity.

The bodyguard was speaking again, and his hand was closing around the rope. "Don't try to fight."

Attia met his eyes with a sudden, unexpected smile.

Challenge accepted.

She snatched the end of the rope from the man's grasp and looped it around his neck, the wiry strands of the cord digging into her bloody hands in the process. With a quick jump, she wedged her feet against the bodyguard's knee and pulled down, hard and fast. There was a wet pop — like pulling apart a roasted chicken thigh — right before they both fell to the ground in a pile of dust and limbs.

Attia gritted her teeth as the pain in her arm flared up toward her shoulder. But just like that, Ennius the bodyguard became damaged goods, crying out and clutching a broken leg that bent at a disturbingly sharp angle. There was not even any blood.

Crius would be proud.

Timeus's pale face turned an impressive shade of burgundy as Attia struggled to her feet again. White spots crowded her vision, and she tried to ignore the rocks and debris that cut into her skin.

"Foolish bitch," Timeus growled before rushing at her.

It was a wholehearted effort, but silly, really. Attia extended her leg and kicked him full in the face with the heel of her foot. With a distinct crunch, his nose shattered, and Timeus fell heavily on top of his bodyguard, eliciting pained screams from the both of them.

Shock and fear were written all over the merchant's face. He clutched his bulging purse before turning and hurrying as fast as he could down the street.

Attia had lifted the rope from around her neck and was beginning to wrap it around her bleeding hand. There was just enough length at the end of it to fit twice around Timeus's neck. She took a step toward him as he shouted through a mouthful of blood.

"Stop her!"

The distracted vigil finally took notice of what was happening at the end of the alley and moved to confront her.

Attia actually smiled through the pain.

Her people were a peculiar tribe. Direct descendants of the Spartans of old, Maedi soldiers were hardened by physical labor, honed and bent and reshaped so that the resulting body and psyche reacted like coiled springs. Pain could be tolerated or even ignored. A sword or bow or staff or even a rock was simply an extension of the self. Fighting was instinctual, natural, effortless. Sparro carried — had carried — a sword that weighed almost as much as Attia did, and Crius could pin a man to the wall with his spear.

Attia wasn't particularly strong. She certainly wasn't big. But she was a Thracian — a warrior of the Maedi. And this poor, stupid vigil was not.

Attia continued to wrap the filthy rope around her hand as she turned to face the watchman. Timeus and his bodyguard — still immobile on the ground — could only stare as the vigil unsheathed his sword and swung pathetically at Attia, missing by more than a few inches. She dodged the weapon with ease before smashing her rope-hardened fist into the center of the watchman's chest, putting all of her weight behind the concentrated blow. It knocked him back only a little, and pain exploded across Attia's wounded arm and wrist. But a soft snapping sound told her she'd hit her mark. The vigil managed to take just two steps before he fell face-first to the ground, the triangular piece of bone at the apex of his ribs having punctured his heart.

There was no one around who could stop her now. Ennius writhed on the ground, trying and failing to stand on his shattered leg. Timeus barely managed to push himself up to his knees before falling down again with a groan. Still, it took Attia a moment to clear out the dense fog in her head.

Move, she told herself through the pain, the dizziness, the loss of blood and breath. Move.

With the rope still wrapped around her fist, she turned on her heel and ran.

The warm air whipped against her face, stinging the little cuts and welts she'd acquired on the journey to Rome. The walls of the city were a brown blur. Everything seemed coated in dust, even though the late afternoon sun lent a slight golden haze to the air. Attia moved so quickly that her feet barely seemed to touch the ground, and for a single brief moment, she relished her victory. I've escaped. I've made it. Two young vigiles turned into the alley just then, their eyes widening at the sight of her running with the rope still dangling from her hand. They reached for their weapons. Or not.

Attia cut to the left and into another alley so narrow that she could brush the walls on either side with her fingertips. Just as the vigiles appeared around the corner behind her, she leaped up and braced her right foot against the wall. There was enough momentum in the motion that she was able to bounce off and plant her left foot on the opposite wall. She did it over and over, back and forth, climbing like a mountain goat with her cracked and bleeding feet. She didn't stop until she reached the fourth-floor window on the northeast corner of a crumbling insula — one of the multilevel apartments built to house the poor.

Attia hooked an arm through the small opening of the window and tumbled into a stark room. A woman screamed and shrank back against the door, trying to hide a little boy behind her. The shouts of vigiles echoed up from the street below. Attia briefly considered climbing back out the window when she saw light shifting near the base of the wall. The cheap clay insulas were already caving in on themselves. The wall separating this room from the next had begun to collapse and tilt away from the outer wall. The shift had created a narrow crawl space at its base, and Attia dove in.

The makeshift tunnel was so tight and jagged that she had to wriggle through on her belly, and for a moment, she wondered if she'd been too hasty. But she could still move — just barely — and it was better than capture. She could hear someone pounding on the door of the apartment she'd just left. She crawled forward, trying to keep her breath even as she made her way through the passage, not knowing what waited on the other side. Her hands left bloody prints in the dirt. She crawled for another thirty yards before she finally saw another shifting light ahead. At last, the little tunnel curved upward, and she emerged onto a rooftop. The setting sun had already cast the road below in shadow. This sunset marked nearly four days without proper sleep, two without food. But she couldn't afford to stop.

(Continues…)



Excerpted from "Blood And Sand"
by .
Copyright © 2017 Isabel Van Wyk.
Excerpted by permission of Tom Doherty Associates.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Blood and Sand 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
Aditi-ATWAMB More than 1 year ago
WELL HELLO NEW ADDITION TO MY FAVOURITE BOOKS EVER LIST. Let’s be honest – you can hear all kinds of GREAT things about a book through hype or from your favourite reviewers, but everybody’s reading experience is personal. Which is why, despite ONLY having read four and five star reviews about Blood and Sand, I was a little skeptical going in. (I’m skeptical about everything, though. #PessimistLife) And yet, C.V. Wyk’s debut novel BLEW MY MIND and had me SERIOUSLY INVESTED in her characters and at the edge of my seat, waiting for more. Which reminds me, IF SOMEONE COULD KINDLY HAND ME THE SEQUEL NOW, IT WOULD BE MUCH APPRECIATED. HONESTLY. Let’s break this down. MY THOUGHTS: 1. The pace of this book was STUNNING. It was fast paced but not brutal and there was never a dull moment. I loved who C.V. Wyk unravelled and created this world, made us fall for her characters and their need to be free from their chains and IT WAS SUCH AN INSPIRING, WONDEROUS, BRILLIANT STORY. 2. I ABSOLUTELY LOVED ATTIA AND HER WARRIOR SPIRIT. She was truly an epic, unafraid, weapon wielding badass who let absolutely NOTHING stand in her way and nothing dampen who she was. Her pain was raw, her healing from her tragedy was beautiful and GOD SHE WAS JUST SUCH A WONDEROUS CHARACTER TO FALL IN LOVE WITH. 3. This book was set in Rome and there were Gladiator brothers, scandals, politics, slaves and everything FELT SO AUTHENTIC AND YET, there was no brutality, making this book suitable for younger readers as well. Also, SPARTACUS WAS FEMALE. THIS BOOK HAD A FEMALE BADASS REBEL AND UGH IT WAS SO BEAUTIFUL. 4. The fierce undefeated gladiator, Xanthus, who is also the Champion of Rome was an ADORABLE MUFFIN AT HEART and it took me all of one chapter in his point of view to fall for him. I LOVED HIS PEACEFUL SPIRIT, HIS LOYALTY and most of all, HIS RESPECTFULNESS TOWARDS ATTIA. Yes for boys in literature that show that nothing is MORE IMPORTANT THAN CONSENT. 5. The ending, the last scene and WHAT IT ALL MEANS FOR BOOK TWO was mind blowing. I also don’t THINK that a certain aspect of the ending will remain in book two and I’m really hoping for that. 6. The only minus point to this book was the AMOUNT OF SECONDARY CHARACTERS (like Xanthus’ gladiator brothers) that were introduced so fast, I didn’t get to know them and I BARELY remember their names. (There was a dude with ‘a’ and another with ‘I’? I don’t KNOW?) Should you read this book?! YES. RIGHT NOW. GO. READ. IT. An absolute masterpiece from a debut author that will make you fall in love, make you hope, leave you in awe and inspired by it's wonderful cast. 5 GLOWING, SWORD SHAPED STARS.
Alyssa75 More than 1 year ago
***Review posted on The Eater of Books! blog*** Blood and Sand by C.V. Wyk Book One of an untitled series Publisher: Tor Teen Publication Date: January 16, 2018 Rating: 5 stars Source: eARC from NetGalley Summary (from Goodreads): FORGED IN BATTLE... FROM THE DUST OF THE ARENA... A LEGEND WILL RISE The action-packed tale of a 17-year-old warrior princess and a handsome gladiator who dared take on the Roman Republic―and gave rise to the legend of Spartacus... For teens who love strong female protagonists in their fantasy and historical fiction, Blood and Sand is a stirring, yet poignant tale of two slaves who dared take on an empire by talented debut author C. V. Wyk. Roma Victrix. The Republic of Rome is on a relentless march to create an empire―an empire built on the backs of the conquered, brought back to Rome as slaves. Attia was once destined to rule as the queen and swordmaiden of Thrace, the greatest warrior kingdom the world had seen since Sparta. Now she is a slave, given to Xanthus, the Champion of Rome, as a sign of his master’s favor. Enslaved as a child, Xanthus is the preeminent gladiator of his generation. Against all odds, Attia and Xanthus form a tentative bond. A bond that will spark a rebellion. A rebellion that threatens to bring the Roman Republic to its end―and gives rise to the legend of Spartacus... What I Liked: Oh my oh my oh my. Blood and Sand, what a debut. I have been eagerly awaiting this book for months, likely close to a year, and I was almost too excited to actually read it when I got a review copy. In the last few weeks, I've been in a terrible reading slump, the worst I've experienced in years. But I think Blood and Sand yanked down and pulled me out of the slump. It is easily a favorite of 2018 already, and I will definitely be rereading it in the future. This is the fictional story of the rise of Spartacus. Traditionally, Spartacus is known to be a Thracian male warrior, but in this story, Spartacus begins with Attia, the Thracian princess and last of her people. She has been captured and sold to a rich Roman named Timeus, who has gifted her to his Champion of Rome, as a sign of favor. The Champion of Rome, Xanthas, is not what Attia expects; he isn't cruel or forceful, and he's a great deal younger despite his ten years as Champion. Attia should be fighting for every opportunity to escape, to run, to exact her revenge on the man that destroyed her people. But she finds that she cannot leave the Champion, who she finds out is just as much a slave as she is. This is the story of two warriors, brought together under bloody circumstances, but united under the same drive for vengeance. One thing that was a delightful surprise was the fact that this book is told in dual narrative! There are two third-person POVs - Attia's, and Xanthas's. I adore dual POV and especially when the two characters are each other's love interests. This story is not Attia's; it's not Xanthas's. It's Attia's and Xanthas's. The story starts with Attia being dragged in chains and sold to the highest bidder. From the start, I liked Attia. She is cold and hardened, undefeated even in chains and branded like livestock. Read the rest of my review on my blog, The Eater of Books! - eaterofbooks DOT blogspot DOT com :)
Aila More than 1 year ago
Blood and Sand just blew me away from start to finish. I loved following Attia’s journey as she headed towards revenge against the Roman Republic – quickly becoming an empire – for destroying her clan and leaving her princess of a nation swallowed by the growing Roman nation. This book loosely follows the story of Spartacus and focuses on the gladiators and fighters who are willing to challenge an empire that took them from their homeland. Following a historical bent like And I Darken by Kiersten White and female warriors that are ready to fight for justice like The Valiant by Lesley Livington, Blood and Sand blends fact and fiction to create an immersive, fast-paced adventure that will leave readers’ hearts pounding and blood rushing. Told from a third person POV, Blood and Sand begins with Attia, the princess of Maedi, seeing her home destroyed and being sold to slavery. To say she hates it is an understatement. The moment she is sold to Timeus, a Roman politician vying his way towards the top, she is ready to plan her revenge and assassination of the people who brought destruction towards her land. For now though, she needs to recuperate and heal while serving Timeus’s family… and the gladiator she was bought for. “She’d been a warrior once, and free. Now she was the only one left, the last Thracian the world would never know. She wondered if history would remember the genocide of the Maedi, the annihilation of her people. Doubtful, she thought. History only serves the winner. Roma victrix.” This gladiator is Xanthus, and he is not what I expected. Although he’s the champion gladiator of the time, he feels sorrow for every death that he causes. Xanthus is actually really sensitive and a kind soul at heart, despite his notoriety as a skilled gladiator. He initially rejects Timeus’s “gift” of Attia because forcing people to do things is the opposite of his nature. This just goes to show that it’s possible to write battle-hardened and skilled characters that aren’t just bulky Alphas – they can have more to their personalities than assertive and borderline-abusive natures. As Xanthus and Attia discover each other’s strengths and hatred against the Roman Republic, they form a close bond against the people who think they own them. I really enjoyed their developing romance because of its foundation on balance and respect. Both warriors care about the other’s feelings and have a healthy communication with one another. You can tell I really like Xanthus’s character because I spent a whole paragraph on this man – he’s just so refreshing! “Because maybe in this house, in this prison, they both wanted the same impossible thing: to be just a man and just a woman, standing free in the rain.” TW: abuse, heavy violence, gore, animal deaths
BoundlessBookaholic More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed this eARC! It was a little slow sometimes, but that happens with world building. I received a copy from Netgalley to review, and ended up giving it 4.5 out of 5 stars. I’ll admit I haven’t read many historical focused books when compared to other genres, but one based on the gladiator days of Rome sounded amazing. So when I saw this was one of the Sunday Street Team books, I had to sign up. And I was so right to do so, because this book was fantastic. I recommend it to historical fiction, and fantasy lovers. I loved Attia, Xanthus, and several of the other slaves/gladiators. I won’t go into much detail, because I don’t want to spoil anything. If you’re looking for a lot of romance, this book isn’t for you. Now I LOVE romance, but if the story is good enough, I don’t mind books with just a hint of romance. Forewarning…the ending made me cry a bit, and also made me want to beg for the next book so I could see what happens next. I need to know. The fact that I have to wait until next year to find out is TORTURE!!!! But seriously, read this book ASAP! You won’t regret it. It was really interesting, had a little romance, lots of fighting, some great historical settings, and fantastic characters you wanted to root for.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Trigger warnings: physical & sexual abuse, suicidal ideation I loved the premise of this - warrior princess Spartacus, heck yes! There's a definite lack of historical YA, and I was super thrilled to read one set in Ancient Rome. However, the author notes in the beginning that she's taken some liberties with historical accuracy, and actually lays a few out in detail in another note at the end of the book. Originally, I thought the warning was odd and unnecessary (well, yeah, I mean, Spartacus wasn't a woman), but one inaccuracy in particular turned out to be the big sticking points for me. It is worth a warning that this is the first in a series, which I didn't realize when I started reading this, so the abrupt cliffhanger ending and unfinished plot threads surprised and disappointed me. I liked Attia, though at times I'm not sure why the other characters did! She's brave, strong, and fierce, a kickass warrior princess, though it seemed like she was missing the other leadership skills she'd need to lead the Thracians. She does protect those she considers friends, though it took her time to come to trust pretty much anyone. I also liked Xanthus, also, though I had problems believing his tragic backstory would have led to him being so kind-hearted and gentle. He is, at heart, a good guy, and he treats Attia with respect, even when she's basically treating him like he's a monster. He's also the de facto leader of Timeus' gladiators, who have trained together since they were first purchased as slaves. He's kind even to Timeus' nephew, Lucius, who will, in all likelihood, be his next master, helping train him in sword fighting. Xanthus seems to be a born leader, and he and Attia together seem to have all the skills to lead a slave rebellion! Unfortunately, the romance between Xanthus and Attia didn't work for me. I didn't feel the chemistry, and it all seemed to happen so fast. I wish it would've been more of a slow-burn, because Ms. Wyk did such a good job of showing how alone and suspicious Attia was, that having her fall for Xanthus so quickly didn't jive. It would've been nice to see them settle in to their friendship before going straight to deeply in love. Besides Attia and Xanthus, the other characters very one-dimensional. There's the darling little poppet who brings out Attia's maternal instincts, the aloof concubine, the slave woman who takes Attia under her wing, and the teen heir who hates his life. I wish we'd gotten more about Xanthus' fellow gladiators. They're not particularly well sketched out, but what was there was interesting, and I would've liked to read more about their backstories and early training together. Unfortunately, I also found the plot predictable and a bit tortuous. For instance, I found it very strange that Attia, who beat up her master, his bodyguard, and a slew of city guards shortly after she was bought at a slave auction, would then be given the job of being nursemaid to the master's young invalid niece. It sometimes felt like people did things out of character just so a certain situation could be created for Attia or Xanthus. Besides the predictable plot, the grand finale was the aforementioned historical inaccuracy that was just... strange. To try to explain without giving away any spoilers, first off, we know from the historical record that basically anything that happened in that last bit would've been scientifically and geographically impossible. I'm willing to suspend di
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Trigger warnings: physical & sexual abuse, suicidal ideation I loved the premise of this - warrior princess Spartacus, heck yes! There's a definite lack of historical YA, and I was super thrilled to read one set in Ancient Rome. However, the author notes in the beginning that she's taken some liberties with historical accuracy, and actually lays a few out in detail in another note at the end of the book. Originally, I thought the warning was odd and unnecessary (well, yeah, I mean, Spartacus wasn't a woman), but one inaccuracy in particular turned out to be the big sticking points for me. It is worth a warning that this is the first in a series, which I didn't realize when I started reading this, so the abrupt cliffhanger ending and unfinished plot threads surprised and disappointed me. I liked Attia, though at times I'm not sure why the other characters did! She's brave, strong, and fierce, a kickass warrior princess, though it seemed like she was missing the other leadership skills she'd need to lead the Thracians. She does protect those she considers friends, though it took her time to come to trust pretty much anyone. I also liked Xanthus, also, though I had problems believing his tragic backstory would have led to him being so kind-hearted and gentle. He is, at heart, a good guy, and he treats Attia with respect, even when she's basically treating him like he's a monster. He's also the de facto leader of Timeus' gladiators, who have trained together since they were first purchased as slaves. He's kind even to Timeus' nephew, Lucius, who will, in all likelihood, be his next master, helping train him in sword fighting. Xanthus seems to be a born leader, and he and Attia together seem to have all the skills to lead a slave rebellion! Unfortunately, the romance between Xanthus and Attia didn't work for me. I didn't feel the chemistry, and it all seemed to happen so fast. I wish it would've been more of a slow-burn, because Ms. Wyk did such a good job of showing how alone and suspicious Attia was, that having her fall for Xanthus so quickly didn't jive. It would've been nice to see them settle in to their friendship before going straight to deeply in love. Besides Attia and Xanthus, the other characters very one-dimensional. There's the darling little poppet who brings out Attia's maternal instincts, the aloof concubine, the slave woman who takes Attia under her wing, and the teen heir who hates his life. I wish we'd gotten more about Xanthus' fellow gladiators. They're not particularly well sketched out, but what was there was interesting, and I would've liked to read more about their backstories and early training together. Unfortunately, I also found the plot predictable and a bit tortuous. For instance, I found it very strange that Attia, who beat up her master, his bodyguard, and a slew of city guards shortly after she was bought at a slave auction, would then be given the job of being nursemaid to the master's young invalid niece. It sometimes felt like people did things out of character just so a certain situation could be created for Attia or Xanthus. Besides the predictable plot, the grand finale was the aforementioned historical inaccuracy that was just... strange. To try to explain without giving away any spoilers, first off, we know from the historical record that basically anything that happened in that last bit would've been scientifically and geographically impossible. I'm willing to suspend di
taramichelle More than 1 year ago
Blood and Sand was one of the best YA historical fiction books I've read lately. The characters all jumped off the page, the setting was vividly described, and the plot made me alternatively laugh and cry. This was the female gladiator story I've been waiting for. Wyn does a brilliant job of bringing Ancient Rome to life, pulling no punches. This Rome is brutal, vicious, and deadly. It was a lot grittier than I was expecting but the details added a lot of depth to the story. In particular, I thought that Wyn did an excellent job of exploring women's role in that society. The plot was paced almost perfectly, with a good balance between the action scenes and the quieter moments. The ending happened a bit quickly but, considering the circumstances, I understood why it was written that way. I loved how the story of Spartacus slowly coalesced, I can't wait to find out what happens next. I fell in love with most of the characters at the very beginning and became incredibly emotionally invested in Attia and Xanthus. There was a wonderful depth to Attia, she was so much more than just a warrior princess. Her character growth was amazing to watch and that final step she took at the ending gave me chills. I also loved her relationship with Xanthus, the scene where they're fighting in the arena together was one of my favorites. The secondary characters also jumped off the page. I would note that there is some abuse so fair warning if that's a trigger for you. I’m going to be very anxiously awaiting the second book because I need to know what happens next in Fire and Ash! 2019 can't come soon enough. I would recommend Blood and Sand to fans of YA historical fiction, particularly those who like ancient Rome. *Disclaimer: I received this book for free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.
taramichelle More than 1 year ago
Blood and Sand was one of the best YA historical fiction books I've read lately. The characters all jumped off the page, the setting was vividly described, and the plot made me alternatively laugh and cry. This was the female gladiator story I've been waiting for. Wyn does a brilliant job of bringing Ancient Rome to life, pulling no punches. This Rome is brutal, vicious, and deadly. It was a lot grittier than I was expecting but the details added a lot of depth to the story. In particular, I thought that Wyn did an excellent job of exploring women's role in that society. The plot was paced almost perfectly, with a good balance between the action scenes and the quieter moments. The ending happened a bit quickly but, considering the circumstances, I understood why it was written that way. I loved how the story of Spartacus slowly coalesced, I can't wait to find out what happens next. I fell in love with most of the characters at the very beginning and became incredibly emotionally invested in Attia and Xanthus. There was a wonderful depth to Attia, she was so much more than just a warrior princess. Her character growth was amazing to watch and that final step she took at the ending gave me chills. I also loved her relationship with Xanthus, the scene where they're fighting in the arena together was one of my favorites. The secondary characters also jumped off the page. I would note that there is some abuse so fair warning if that's a trigger for you. I’m going to be very anxiously awaiting the second book because I need to know what happens next in Fire and Ash! 2019 can't come soon enough. I would recommend Blood and Sand to fans of YA historical fiction, particularly those who like ancient Rome. *Disclaimer: I received this book for free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.
taramichelle More than 1 year ago
Blood and Sand was one of the best YA historical fiction books I've read lately. The characters all jumped off the page, the setting was vividly described, and the plot made me alternatively laugh and cry. This was the female gladiator story I've been waiting for. Wyn does a brilliant job of bringing Ancient Rome to life, pulling no punches. This Rome is brutal, vicious, and deadly. It was a lot grittier than I was expecting but the details added a lot of depth to the story. In particular, I thought that Wyn did an excellent job of exploring women's role in that society. The plot was paced almost perfectly, with a good balance between the action scenes and the quieter moments. The ending happened a bit quickly but, considering the circumstances, I understood why it was written that way. I loved how the story of Spartacus slowly coalesced, I can't wait to find out what happens next. I fell in love with most of the characters at the very beginning and became incredibly emotionally invested in Attia and Xanthus. There was a wonderful depth to Attia, she was so much more than just a warrior princess. Her character growth was amazing to watch and that final step she took at the ending gave me chills. I also loved her relationship with Xanthus, the scene where they're fighting in the arena together was one of my favorites. The secondary characters also jumped off the page. I would note that there is some abuse so fair warning if that's a trigger for you. I’m going to be very anxiously awaiting the second book because I need to know what happens next in Fire and Ash! 2019 can't come soon enough. I would recommend Blood and Sand to fans of YA historical fiction, particularly those who like ancient Rome. *Disclaimer: I received this book for free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.
paisleypikachu More than 1 year ago
Well. This book is the perfect example of a three star read. BLOOD AND SAND was by no means a bad book. There was plenty that I liked about it. The two POV characters were really fun to read, and I feel like they stood well on their own(more on that later). The story was interesting enough. The pacing was great. I liked the writing, and there were moments where the author's sense of humor really resonated with me. The problem is that none of those things made Blood and Sand stand out for me. I finished it about a week ago and I'm already having trouble remembering the names of characters. So not only was this book unremarkable for me, but it also had flaws that made it even less enjoyable. Now, I do think part of MY issue with this story is that I loathe most history, so I had no clue who Spartacus was going into this. I keep thinking that maybe if I knew more about what I was getting into then maybe I would have enjoyed it more?? All I know is that I didn't feel a connection to this story. It was interesting, and had some fun moments, but it never really truly grabbed me and held on. Going back to the characters, I enjoyed them- on their own. I never once bought the relationship between Attia and Xanthus. Way too much insta-lovey, "I just met you but I would die for you" kind of stuff going on for my tastes. I feel like a lot of their relationship building moments happened off the page, which doesn't help me as the reader at all because then I'm stuck with being told how into each other they are and I'm not given any OTP-worthy material to work with. And now we come to the plot. Again, it was good enough, I guess. But I won't remember any of it six month from now, other than one cool twist at the end maybe. Even the climax felt lack-luster to me. Overall, I'm thinking maybe BLOOD AND SAND just wasn't for me. I would recommend it to fans of Nevernight or An Ember in the Ashes. And I say if you read the synopsis and think it sounds interesting, give it a try. It's by no means a bad book, and I know other people who really enjoyed it. I'll definitely be checking out the sequel, FIRE AND ASH, in 2019.