Breakfast at Sally's: One Homeless Man's Inspirational Journey

Breakfast at Sally's: One Homeless Man's Inspirational Journey

by Richard LeMieux

Paperback(Reprint)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781632203465
Publisher: Skyhorse
Publication date: 05/12/2015
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 448
Sales rank: 181,548
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 1.20(d)

About the Author

Richard LeMieux is a writer and ex-businessman who was once happily married and the owner of several cars and three boats. Evicted from his luxury home after his business failed, and living with his dog, Willow, in a beat-up old van, LeMieux wrote Breakfast at Sally’s on a secondhand typewriter. He is now a public speaker, talking about his experiences as a homeless person. He and Willow live in Bremerton, Washington.

Table of Contents

Preface to the New Edition 6

Introduction 9

Chapter 1 Sally's 13

Chapter 2 A Day with C, Campbell, Steinbeck, and Twain 27

Chapter 3 The Lady in Red 43

Chapter 4 Mr. C's Neighborhood 53

Chapter 5 Going Looking for Angels 65

Chapter 6 The Food Angels 73

Chapter 7 Sanctuary at the Hospital 85

Chapter 8 Dr. Z 111

Chapter 9 Oh, God! 123

Chapter 10 Off to the Mental Institution 129

Chapter 11 Andy, the Beautiful Weed 139

Chapter 12 Another Day in Paradise 149

Chapter 13 I Get Saved 161

Chapter 14 Angel of Prey 177

Chapter 15 David's Song 189

Chapter 16 Vinny 205

Chapter 17 Dumpster Diving 219

Chapter 18 Vinny Dies 225

Chapter 19 The Opera 235

Chapter 20 The Lucky Rocks 247

Chapter 21 The Hilton 255

Chapter 22 Andy Gets Lucky 267

Chapter 23 The Real Field of Dreams 279

Chapter 24 How much for that Doggie? 291

Chapter 25 Camping 299

Chapter 26 A Room with a View 315

Chapter 27 S'Ghetti 337

Chapter 28 Bank of America 353

Chapter 29 Hero Lost 367

Chapter 30 The Church Mice 381

Chapter 31 Just Another Headline 395

Chapter 32 The Holy Ghosts 403

Chapter 33 So much to Write 417

Epilogue 421

In Appreciation 425

About the Author 429

Book Club or Classroom Discussion Questions 433

Getting Involved 435

Customer Reviews

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Breakfast at Sally's 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 33 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Breakfast at Sally’s is a very addictive read. It starts a bit slow, but a few pages in you are hooked. Losing everything (financially and personal relationships) is a tough pill to swallow. Richard LeMieux has written a captivating book about going from being on top of the world to being homeless. It is very interesting and well written.
believer07 More than 1 year ago
I loved this book!This book is the supremely written story of the author and his life on the streets. Richard opens your eyes to the stories of how and why people are or become homeless and the everyday simple struggles that they face. This story opens your eyes to the true help that is needed for people that don't have homes to go "home" to and the society of people on the "streets". Richard, I thank you, where ever you are for sharing this story of yours and the people of Bremerton,WA with the world. God bless you and those that don't have a roof over their heads tonight! P.S.- I believe "C" is a true angel!!!!!!
EllenDS More than 1 year ago
So well written and almost impossible to put down. I won't look at a homeless person in the same way again. Ellen
Twink More than 1 year ago
Richard LeMieux had it all. He had been a successful sportswriter and owned a small publishing company. He had raised three children and travelled extensively with his partner of seventeen years. He lived the 'good life', eating out, spending lots on material goods. Until the bottom fell out - his business failed, his partner left and his adult children and former friends wanted nothing more to do with him. On Christmas Day 2002, despondent and suffering from severe depression, LeMieux attempted suicide. Thankfully he was unsuccessful.

For the next year and a half, he lives with his faithful companion Willow (the Wonder Dog) in his van. Taking many of his meals at the Salvation Army, (hence the title) we meet many of the other homeless and working poor that populate the city of Bremerton, Washington.

Drawing on his writing background and a donated typewriter, LeMieux begins to write a book about his journey. Families living in church parking lots in their cars, camps of young people living peacefully on the outskirts of town, the mentally ill, the addicted. But it is the caring and compassion shown by these downtrodden to each other that strikes such a chord with me. In particular a man only identified as C, who is so responsive to the needs of those in his neighbourhood. There are many, many other stories within this book.

With the economy the way it is, I am sure there will be many more people forced into situations that they would never have forseen or imagined. I am always inspired by memoirs such as Breakfast at Sally's. Not just by the authors, but those who choose to make a difference.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Please, by all means, get a hold of this book and read it. It affirms the saying, "The more you give, the more you receive." The repayment may not be monetary or material, but Richard is living proof that kindness from and to others will see one through tough times. Borrow it, buy it, lend it: You've got to get the word out about this book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It's been a while since I read this, but if you want a glimpse into homelessness (and we all could stand a glimpse), this book is incredible. You can't be lazy and homeless. It's a lot of work.
Taniacy More than 1 year ago
This book was wonderful. I can honestly say that it reminded me that the homeless are people too, and it doesn't hurt to smile.
mehp More than 1 year ago
I read this book as one of my book club selections. I truly enjoyed this book. It was well written and made me think about the human suffering in this country with homelessness. Unfortunately there are not enough "safety nets" for people who find themselves homeless as a result of losing a job, sickness in the family, their own sickness, etc. I believe this country needs to do more to assist individuals and families who find themselves homeless. Everyone deserves a warm dry place to sleep at night, a place to call their own. No man, woman or child should ever go to "bed" at night without having eaten. This was a great first book by Richard LeMieux, and I look forward to reading his next book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I thought this book was so well written and very interesting to read. Richard's words were so honest and drew me in. I would highly recommend this book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Back in sophomore year in high school, my english teacher read us this book. this book is soo inspiration and i recommend it to anyone. it really makes you look at homeless people in a different light. bad things really do happen to good people. it's an easy read, it's not difficult. after our teacher finished reading this story, it made me want to go out and try to help some of the local homeless. I'm from the kitsap area so knowning that the author was from my area made me want to help out even more.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Breakfast at Sally's is at the same time depressing and inspiring. It opens your eyes to the sometimes hidden or ignored problem of homelessness in your hometown. Richard LeMieux speaks from the heart as a man more than "down on his luck" who lives for a length of time in his van with his dog, Willow. While you feel sorry for his plight, you begin to see that this journey for him is a revelation. His homeless friends begin to take their place in his life as a true "family." Perhaps all that he held dear in his previous life was not as dear as that which he finds when he has nothing. This book forces you to see that element of our society which you'd rather not see or think about. But it also inspires you to want to help these people you once thought we unworthy of your time/resources. This book is an authentic portrayal of a man who loses his material possessions, his family, and for a while, his sense of self worth. But through his journey he comes to see what his mission in life must be. Our book club read this book and invited Richard to speak at our meeting. He is soft spoken and truly authentic. We were inspired after reading his book and talking with him to donate over $700 to the local (Bremerton) Salvation Army in his name. I highly recommend this book; an easy and enjoyable and inspiring read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is probably the most memorable book that I've read in a long while. It's touching, enlightening, and gives you a peek into what it is like to be homeless in America. This book will make you feel lucky for what you have and make you want to give to those less fortunate. An excellent job by the author - I can't wait to read his next book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I could not put this book down. Living in southeast Michigan I've heard pleas from many members of our society in our troubled economy. This book brought the issue even closer into my heart.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have lived in the Kitsap area all my life and this book really touched my heart. Once I started reading it I couldn't put it down and I couldn't stop telling people about it. Thank you Mr. LeMieux for sharing your story!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Just log off and read it. You may be moved to compose your own review.
SFCC on LibraryThing 10 months ago
It¿s a non-fiction book which takes place in our state, it¿s very well written¿and tells the story about someone who had been ¿successful¿ and in these economic crisis times became a person who lived out of his van with his dog companion. He not only describes his experiences but also the change in attitude he has about ¿street people¿ when he actually gets to know who they are as people. It¿s definitely a ¿cultural awareness¿ piece and one that increases understanding and tolerance towards those we might tend to write off. B. Scheon
RefPenny on LibraryThing 10 months ago
Richard LeMieux had it all - family, job and a luxurious lifestyle but ended up living in his van with his little dog, Willow. He soon finds out which churches provide food on which nights and makes friends with many of the other homeless people. Despite the subject matter this is not a depressing book. It offers insight into the lives of homeless people and helps us see that they are not very different to us.
Twink on LibraryThing 10 months ago
Richard LeMieux had it all. He had been a successful sportswriter and owned a small publishing company. He had raised three children and travelled extensively with his partner of seventeen years. He lived the 'good life', eating out, spending lots on material goods. Until the bottom fell out - his business failed, his partner left and his adult children and former friends wanted nothing more to do with him. On Christmas Day 2002, despondent and suffering from severe depression, LeMieux attempted suicide. Thankfully he was unsuccessful.For the next year and a half, he lives with his faithful companion Willow (the Wonder Dog) in his van. Taking many of his meals at the Salvation Army, (hence the title) we meet many of the other homeless and working poor that populate the city of Bremerton, Washington.Drawing on his writing background and a donated typewriter, LeMieux begins to write a book about his journey. Families living in church parking lots in their cars, camps of young people living peacefully on the outskirts of town, the mentally ill, the addicted. But it is the caring and compassion shown by these downtrodden to each other that strikes such a chord with me. In particular a man only identified as C, who is so responsive to the needs of those in his neighbourhood. There are many, many other stories within this book.With the economy the way it is, I am sure there will be many more people forced into situations that they would never have forseen or imagined. I am always inspired by memoirs such as Breakfast at Sally's. Not just by the authors, but those who choose to make a difference.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Excellent story teaching the reader best not to judge unless you've walked in their shoes.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Loved this book!
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