×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Coming to Terms
     

Coming to Terms

by William Safire
 

See All Formats & Editions

When William Safire delineates the difference between misinformation and disinformation or “distances himself” from clichés, people sit up and take notice. Which is not to say that Safire’s readers always take the punning pundit at his word: they don’t, and he’s got the letters to prove it.
 
Among the

Overview

When William Safire delineates the difference between misinformation and disinformation or “distances himself” from clichés, people sit up and take notice. Which is not to say that Safire’s readers always take the punning pundit at his word: they don’t, and he’s got the letters to prove it.
 
Among the entries in Coming to Terms, this all-new collection of Safire’s “On Language” columns, you’ll read the repartee of Lexicographic Irregulars great and small. John Haim of New York sets in concrete what properly to call a cement truck, while Charlton Heston challenges an interpretation of Hamlet’s “to take arms against a sea of troubles” and Gene Shalit passes along his favorite Yogi Berra-ism.
 
Bringing them all together are dozens of Safire’s most illuminating and witty columns, from “Right Stuffing” to “Getting Whom.” When William Safire comes to terms, there’s never a dull moment.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In this seventh collection of his playful, witty, instructive ``On Language'' syndicated columns, Safire again reprints letters from members of the Gotcha Gang and the Nitpickers' League, and other readers who have their own two cents to add. Among his concerns in this batch, Safire explains why he hasn't used the phrase gilding the lily for 40 years (``Eschew certitude,'' he warns in this connection). He comments on the trend toward mispronunciation, giving ek-setera and reckonize as examples; looks into the origins of such words as bimbo and roundheels ; examines such euphemisms for lover as significant other , special friend and main squeeze ; pays tribute to Yogi Berra's mastery of the ``bonaprop''; and reports what happened when the management of a San Francisco hotel adopted Safire's recommendation of putting a dictionary in every room. For those who care about language, or who just want to have fun, Safire delivers. (June)
Library Journal
Compiled from Safire's 1988-89 New York Times Magazine columns ``On Language,'' this book contains about 160 essays along with many letters commenting on them. The topics cover locutions and circumlocutions from government ( misinformation and disinformation ), grammar (relative pronouns, restrictive clauses, it's and its ), origins of expressions ( Locust Valley lockjaw, the New York minute ), usage ( like in place of as ), and many oddities of the English language. The book is fun for language mavens and for those who didn't know what they didn't know about English. Safire is a popular writer, as seen by the success of his previous compilations of his column (e.g., Language Maven Strikes Again , LJ 7/90), so this book will be in demand.-- Kitty Chen Dean, Nassau Coll., Garden City, N.Y.
School Library Journal
YA-- The newest collection of the author's syndicated ``On Language'' columns is a complete delight. Letters from the Gotcha! Gang and the Nitpicker's League appear again and address their observations to U. Ofallpeople. Whether he is discussing the origin of a word, a malapropism, or commenting on duh-Dah-duh-Dah, Safire is right on target.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780307800596
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
01/04/2012
Sold by:
Random House
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
402
File size:
2 MB

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews