Counterfeit Gods: The Empty Promises of Money, Sex, and Power, and the Only Hope that Matters

Counterfeit Gods: The Empty Promises of Money, Sex, and Power, and the Only Hope that Matters

by Timothy Keller

Paperback

$16.00
View All Available Formats & Editions
Want it by Monday, December 17 Order now and choose Expedited Shipping during checkout.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781594485497
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 10/04/2011
Pages: 256
Sales rank: 68,383
Product dimensions: 5.04(w) x 7.14(h) x 0.76(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Timothy Keller started Redeemer Presbyterian Church in Manhattan in 1989 with his wife, Kathy, and their three sons. Today, Redeemer has more than five thousand regular Sunday attendees, plus the members of more than one hundred new churches around the world.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Counterfeit Gods 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 42 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Once again, Keller tells it like it is for the American Christian, unpacking some cultural aspects and calling the American church to authentic godliness. I've already recommended it to key leaders around me, and passed on my own copy (I'll get it back). For anyone who feels bound by their anger, guilt, hurt or pain, I also recommend "When God Stopped Keeping Score." I thought that the book was just about forgiveness, I soon learned, it was about so much more than that. I was about how you should deal with friends, family and yourself and more importantly, how to keep these relationships strong when things go wrong. Having read it, I feel like a better person. Maybe because this book spoke to me and not down to me. I have read a lot of books that was written like I didn't know anything. What the author of "When God Stopped Keeping Score" does is talk to you like a friend. I needed that. You will understand why when you read it. Buy it here on BN.com
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you want a book which will challenge the very fabric of your life, check out Keller's Counterfeit Gods. He hits at the core of who we are and those things which we cling to over and above Christ.
bookworm12 on LibraryThing 23 days ago
Keller does a great job referencing Biblical stories, like those of Abraham, Jacob, Jonah, and Nebuchadnezzar, to explain mankind¿s tendency towards idolatry. We put our spouses, children, jobs, interest, etc. above all else. Every time we do this, the most important aspect of our life, our relationship with Christ, falls apart. Keller never comes across as preachy and condescending. Instead he uses real examples and talks about both the issue and solution. It¿s a quick read and packs a punch.
SwampIrish on LibraryThing 23 days ago
Using the biblical stories of Jacob, Jonah, and Nebuchadnezzar Tim Keller lays bare the idol-making factories our hearts really are. Relief from this problem is not by outward rule-following and 'doing better', but by repenting and placing your hope in the only One who truly deserves it...Jesus Christ.
brianghedges on LibraryThing 23 days ago
Counterfeit Gods by Timothy Keller is a gripping exploration of the human heart and the ways we substitute false gods for the True God. Keller masterfully weaves together contemporary concerns, spiritual and psychological analysis, and biblical narrative to show us that while sex, romance, money, success, and power are good things in themselves, they make poor masters. When we give our trust, love, and service to these things, they destroy our lives. But this foray into the labyrinths of the human heart is not only gripping, it is convicting. Keller exposes not only our surface idols, but our deep idols - our cravings for significance, comfort, security, and approval. These are the desires that drive us to give our affections to false lovers, place our trust in alternative saviors, and swear our allegiance to other lords. But Keller never leaves us without hope. This book is as liberating as it is convicting, as Keller confronts us again and again with the good news of God's love for sinners, displayed in the cross and resurrection of Jesus Christ.Keller may be one of the more important Christian thinkers and writers of our day. His ministry experience in New York City has equipped him with a unique ability to speak to both the secular and the sacred dimensions of our lives at the same time - and to show us how intertwined these dimensions really are. Keller addresses both skeptics and believers and demonstrates a broad grasp of not only biblical studies and theology, but also literature, sociology, philosophy, psychology, and the arts in his writing. In chapters exploring the relevance of biblical stories from Genesis or the Gospel of Luke, we also encounter insights from Ernest Becker and Friedrich Nietzche, illustrations from Madonna, Andrew Carnegie, or the film Chariots of Fire, and commentary from Robert Alter and other Jewish or Christian biblical scholars. This liberal use of sources, plus Keller's engaging yet succinct writing style, make this a very enjoyable read.There is also a practicality to this book. Keller is not just a great theologian, he is a pastor. And he writes with the heart of a skilled diagnostician of souls. He begins the book with a discussion of the idol factory of the human heart, and ends by showing us how to find and replace our idols. He not only exposes the cancers that are eating us away, he applies the scalpel of the gospel with surgical skill. Like Jesus himself, Keller knows how to both wound and heal.
deusvitae on LibraryThing 23 days ago
An analysis of the pervasive idolatry of mankind, particularly as it relates to 21st century Americans.Keller combines discussions of modern challenges with illustrative narratives from Scripture to show the human propensity to take good things of creation and absolutizing them as their "god." He explicitly discusses the "gods" of success, power, politics, money, desire, love, and pride, and the principles that govern them and the development of other "gods" in one's life. This is an expansion of the same theme that he spoke of in "The Reason For God." As a Presbyterian he is committed to the Protestant "grace only" and "faith only" positions, and derives much from Augustine, Luther, and Edwards. He sees everything through the grace only prism, for better or worse, and while there is much to appreciate and agree with in his exegesis, I found some of his connections in some of the narratives to be a bit shaky. He also pursues the idea that idolatry is at the heart of all sin, and while I would agree that idolatry is what drives a lot of sin and sinful impulses, I'm not quite sure if it can be made so absolute.Nevertheless, a thought-provoking and beneficial read.
mels_71 on LibraryThing 23 days ago
Timothy Keller shows how good things become idols when they become ultimate things, when we look to them for our meaning. Throughout the book he uses biblical characters to illustrate how idols work in our lives to cause destruction. I felt that sometimes he pushed the explanations a little further than the biblical accounts warranted. Keeping God front and centre in your life is always difficult and Keller is realistic in his assessment that in this life we will need to continually removing the idols that spring up in our hearts. While much of it was covering old ground, he offers some good questions to ask when examining yourself and gives his remedy to idols - don't love the good things (like family) less, love God more.
SuperReaderChick 4 months ago
The introduction to this book was very compelling and thought-provoking, which I find to be the norm for Keller's books. I was very eager to delve deeper into this idea of counterfeit gods and how to restore hope in times of despair. The first chapter was very interesting as it examined Abraham's life and sacrifice. I always enjoy Keller's use and analysis of biblical stories to emphasize his points and lessons. He blends these with real-world examples and anecdotes. His books are always brilliantly written in this way. CG continued along this path, providing examples of our counterfeit gods with a plethora of biblical examples and tales. I really enjoyed the path that it took and the way that it made me constantly reevaluate my thinking.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Insightful as a tool to acquaint one with gods we often worship.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Truly convicting.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago