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Crossing Jordan
     

Crossing Jordan

4.9 12
by Adrian Fogelin, Suzy Schultz (Illustrator)
 

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Cass is dreading a long, lonely summer until Jemmie and her family move in next door. The two girls hit if off right away, but there's just one probem: their parents don't want them socializing with each other.

The two girls challenge each ther to a race, and soon they secretly become best friends. Cass quickly realizes that a summer with Jemmie will be anything

Overview

Cass is dreading a long, lonely summer until Jemmie and her family move in next door. The two girls hit if off right away, but there's just one probem: their parents don't want them socializing with each other.

The two girls challenge each ther to a race, and soon they secretly become best friends. Cass quickly realizes that a summer with Jemmie will be anything but boring. But when echoes of the past and voices from the present threaten to separate them, Cass and Jemmie must prove how far they'll go to save their friendship.

Adrian Fogelin's unforgettable characters make us laugh, yet poignantly remind us of fences that too often continue to separate us from one another. --BOOK JACKET.

ADRIAN FOGELIN was moved to write this story of prejudice and friendship after an incident in her neighborhood. A librarian and a fiction reader for the International Quarterly, Adrian lives in Tallahassee, Florida, with her family. This is her first book for children.

SUZY SCHULTZ is an award-winning fine artist and illustrator. Her art is regularly exhibited, and her portraits are found in collections across the United States. She lives in Atlanta, Georgia.
--BOOK JACKET

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Children's Literature
This excellent middle-grade novel shows Cass Bodine spying on the new neighbors through a knothole. She hears the mother say, "I'm sorry. I can't love a bunch of crackers who put up a fence as soon as they hear a black family is moving in next door." But Cass and Jemmie soon meet. Even better, they discover they're the same age, twelve, and both are 'way better than average runners.' They keep reading Jane Eyre together and running track in the early mornings, meetings that must be kept secret, except from Nana Grace, Jemmie's grandmother. She tells them about the Civil Rights movement, lets them know "crossing Jordan" was code in slave times for reaching freedom. Adrian Fogelin's characters are spunky and competitive, and her portraits of the prejudiced families are drawn with a loving hand--they're good folks who accept equal rights in theory without knowing how to put them into practice. The incidents chosen to illustrate prejudice's myriad subtleties may evoke a jolt of recognition. Compliments to Fogelin for a smoothly written story that will keep kids good company as they struggle to excel as runners or make friends across racial lines. 2000, Peachtree Publishers, Ages 9 to 13, $14.95. Reviewer: Nancy Tilly
ALAN Review
In her first novel for young readers, Fogelin writes a moving story of two adolescents females, Cassie, who is white, and Jemmie, who is African American. Through their common interest in running, and because they are neighbors (whose yard are separated by a fence through which they talk) the girls develop a friendship that even their parents' racist traditions and attitudes cannot prevent. Inspired by her actual experience in a mixed race neighborhood in Tallahassee, Florida, Fogelin gently shows the reader that negative attitudes can be absorbed by children and teenagers, and that sometimes, it is through the innocence of children that adults can learn about tolerance and appreciation for those who are racially or otherwise different. Fogelin does not paint either family as more at fault than the other; both Cassie's and Jemmie's families believ the girls should avoid contact with a person who has a different skin color. Cassie and Jemmie are talented runners who challenge each other on the track, but they are also thoughtful adolescents who support each other when their families try to keep fence between them. At no point in the book does Fogelin preach to her readers, yet her message about the negative potential for prejudices to be inherited, and the strength of teens to transcend long-established prejudices, is clear and inspiring. Genre: Overcoming racism/Young female athletes. 2000, Peachtree, Ages 9 to 12, $10.97. Reviewer: Sissi Carroll
School Library Journal
Gr 5-8-A contemporary story set in Tallahassee, FL, of interracial friendship despite parental opposition, with a clear purpose and predictable outcome. Twelve-year-old Cass befriends African-American Jemmie when her family moves into the house next door. The girls both love to run and become instant friends, racing each morning. They also read Jane Eyre together, analyzing and alternating chapters. Calling themselves "Chocolate Milk," the girls derive inspiration from Jemmie's wise, gospel-singing grandmother and set an example of understanding for both families. Cass, however, must keep their friendship a secret from her racist father until her baby sister's heatstroke compels Jemmie's indignant mother to volunteer her nursing skills. From then on, Cass's grateful parents are solicitous of their new neighbors and both families cheer the girls to a dramatic finish in a fund-raiser race. Jemmie is wisecracking and confident, challenging her responsible and reflective friend to be the first in her family to aspire to a college degree. Some of the parental reasons for racial mistrust are exposed, civil rights history is touched on, and an upbeat ending results. Although several clich d remarks and reactions seem contrived, Jemmie and Cass are likable, lively characters, and readers will enjoy the repartee between them.-Gerry Larson, Durham School of the Arts, NC Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781561452156
Publisher:
Peachtree Publishers, Ltd.
Publication date:
04/28/2000
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
160
Product dimensions:
6.12(w) x 8.80(h) x 0.66(d)
Lexile:
650L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Read an Excerpt

I squinched my eye up to the knothole in the fence. She was real skinny and tall like me. Her long legs seemed to start at the ground and end at her ears.

Next thing I knew, a brown eye was looking back at me through the hole.

"Do you like to run?" I asked.

"Run? Girl, I don't run, I fly. Can't nobody beat me."

"Bet I could."

I heard a whoop of laughter from the other side of the fence. "Dream on, girl."

Then the eyeball looked me up and down. "Got some long legs on you, but I'd still beat you."

"Would not," I said.

"Would too," she said.

--BACK COVER JACKET.

Meet the Author

Adrian Fogelin was moved to write this story of prejudice and friendship after an incident in her neighborhood. She is also the author of Anna Casey’s Place in the World, another story set in Cass and Jemmie’s neighborhood, and My Brother’s Hero. Adrian lives in Tallahassee, Florida, with her family. You can find her on the web at www.adrianfogelin.com

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Crossing Jordan 4.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Crossing jorden is awsome!!!! I've only watched the show and it is awsome!!!!!!!!! Thank you for the awsome show!!!!!!! : )
SamStar More than 1 year ago
The author of this came to my school today even though I never read her books.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
TeensReadToo More than 1 year ago
"Good fences make good neighbors." That's what Cass's dad said when he found out a black family was moving in next door. Cass even helped him build the fence. But as the new neighbors moved in, Cass couldn't help but be curious. Watching through a peephole in the fence, Cass's blue eye found a brown eye staring back at her.

Cass asked Jemmie, "Do you like to run?"

Jemmie responded, "Run? Girl, I don't run, I fly. Can't nobody beat me."

The race was on. They both sneaked out of their homes the next morning to find out who was fastest, and instead found "Chocolate Milk."

This is the story of their friendship. It's also a story of crossing boundaries, change, and eventual acceptance. Theirs is a natural friendship, a friendship that's tried by the bigotry of Cass's dad, and the stubbornness of Jemmie's mother. It takes the misfortunes of a tiny baby for the parents to begin tearing down their mental fences.

Adrian Fogelin does a beautiful job of portraying tenuous relationships that exist among people trying to understand cultures different from their own, The girls are sweet and fun; their dialogue is well-written, immersing the reader in the long, hot, dog days of summer in Tallahassee, Florida.

CROSSING JORDAN leaves the reader with hope for future generations, that they will be inspired to appreciate each other, just as Cass and Jemmie were inspired to call themselves Chocolate Milk. This is the first book of Adrian Fogelin's that I've read, and I'm sure I'll be looking for more of her titles.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Crossing jordan is about two young girls who are two diffrent races. They love to run. They have many obstacles that they have to go through.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Two Girls explore what it means to be friends in spite of grown ups' prejudice. These girls are well written characters other kids can relate to. It gives racism a face and talks about it without being 'Preachy¿. It would be a great book to start a discussion about prejudice of any kind and how it affects the person with the prejudice as well as the person on the receiving end. They are also full of local color about the real Florida (not Orlando or Miami Beach)!! My son's 4-5 grade teacher read this book to the class and you could have heard a pin drop as she read it aloud! The kids begged her to read more! My son refused to leave early because he would have missed a chapter of 'Crossing Jordan¿. This author really knows kids and what hooks them into a story. I would recommend any of her books, especially the others in the series: 'Crossing Jordan', 'Anna Casey's Place in the World', and 'My Brother's Hero'. They make great read alouds too. This author takes on issues and wraps them in a story.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was really cool because it's showing younger people not to be prejudice towards others. I thought the author did a good job overall.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This excellent middle-grade novel shows Cass Bodine spying on the new neighbors through a knothole. She hears the mother say, 'I'm sorry. I can't love a bunch of crackers who put up a fence as soon as they hear a black family is moving in next door.' But Cass and Jemmie soon meet. Even better, they discover they're the same age, twelve, and both are 'way better than average runners.' They keep reading Jane Eyre together and running track in the early mornings, meetings that must be kept secret, except from Nana Grace, Jemmie's grandmother. She tells them about the Civil Rights movement, lets them know 'crossing Jordan' was code in slave times for reaching freedom. Adrian Fogelin's characters are spunky and competitive, and her portraits of the prejudiced families are drawn with a loving hand--they're good folks who accept equal rights in theory without knowing how to put them into practice. The incidents chosen to illustrate prejudice's myriad subtleties may evoke a jolt of recognition. Compliments to Fogelin for a smoothly written story that will keep kids good company as they struggle to excel as runners or make friends across racial lines. 2000, Peachtree Publishers, Ages 9 to 13, $14.95. Reviewer: Nancy Tilly
Guest More than 1 year ago
My teacher-daughter-in-law brought me the book from her school library. I couldn't put it down! A wonderful story which I hope will be read by people of any age, living north or south; east or west.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was outstanding. I have read alot of books and this is 1 of my favorites. It is an awesome book for 11-13 yr. olds. If you dont read this book your missin out on alot of fun.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book shows a true friendship. Even though they were forbidden by racism. This is a highly reccomended book!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Should be a required reading book for children. Easy to relate to and enjoyable to read. First book I've read for children that dealt with race issues in a straightforward manner without being either 'preachy' or 'tiptoeing around' the issue. Wonderful illustration of how we can bond with others based on common interests not shade of skin, and how we still yet have far to go.