Cruising Attitude: Tales of Crashpads, Crew Drama, and Crazy Passengers at 35,000 Feet

Cruising Attitude: Tales of Crashpads, Crew Drama, and Crazy Passengers at 35,000 Feet

by Heather Poole

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Overview

Real-life flight attendant Heather Poole has written a charming and funny insider’s account of life and work in the not-always-friendly skies. Cruising Attitude is a Coffee, Tea, or Me? for the 21st century, as the author parlays her fifteen years of flight experience into a delightful account of crazy airline passengers and crew drama, of overcrowded crashpads in “Crew Gardens” Queens and finding love at 35,000 feet. The popular author of “Galley Gossip,” a weekly column for AOL’s award-winning travel website Gadling.com, Poole not only shares great stories, but also explains the ins and outs of flying, as seen from the flight attendant’s jump seat.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780061986468
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 03/06/2012
Pages: 272
Sales rank: 259,648
Product dimensions: 5.30(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.80(d)

About the Author

Heather Poole has been published in The Best Women's Travel Writing 2010. Her regular online column, "Galley Gossip: Confessions from the Jumpseat with Heather Poole," has received more than two million views and is featured on AOL's award-winning travel website, Gadling.com.

Table of Contents

1 Plane Crazy 1

2 I Never Wanted to Be a Flight Attendant 12

3 Barbie Boot Camp 26

4 Welcome to New York 51

5 Prepare for Takeoff 67

6 Unhappy Holidays 85

7 Cruising Altitude 99

8 Love Is in the Air. Sort Of. 118

9 Life on the Ground 128

10 Flying Freak Show 148

11 Dating Pilots 164

12 Marry Me, Fly Free! 178

13 Turbulence 193

14 There's No Respect Flying Domestic 215

15 I'll Never Quit! 232

Acknowledgments 261

About the Author 263

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Cruising Attitude 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 85 reviews.
Heart2Heart More than 1 year ago
Take a behind the scenes look at flying the friendly skies! I'm sure most of you have flown before and have had the opportunity at sometime to interact with a flight attendant. I think there are quite a few details we, as passengers, never consider when flying and that's just how hard of a job, flight attendants actually have. It takes more than a nicely dressed attendant who smiles graciously as you enter and sets about to make sure your flight is enjoyable. In the book, Cruising Attitude by Heather Poole, a reader is taken on a behind the scenes tour of what it takes to make it to a flight attendant. From the long and grueling training most don't pass, to the crazy stories of some of the things passengers expect while flying. Not to mention just where do they go in between flights, what happens when flights are delayed and what are some of the perks about being a flight attendant. Heather Poole has been a flight attendant for various airline companies in the past fifteen years and has seen it all. Things we would never think about but that people have tried, done and some have been arrested for. She shares some celebrity encounters without mentioning the names of just how some use their status and some are strictly just like us as passengers. I think for me the most unusual story is that flight attendants don't get paid until the plane leaves the gate, which means, when faced with delays, they aren't getting paid to hear our complaints. Another crazy story is one passenger who packed his deceased mother in a garment bag to get her to her final destination to avoid the exorbitant fees to have her shipped any other way. This book is packed with amazing and down-right shocking stories of just what a career in being a flight attendant really is like and for me, makes me appreciate what they do a whole lot more. Never will I see them the same after reading this great book. I received this book compliments of William Morrow, a division of Harper Collins Publishers for my honest review and LOVED it! This one rates a perfect 5 out of 5 stars in my opinion and look forward to sharing this one with my readers. If you're a frequent flyer or are just interested in what it takes to be a flight attendant, you'll definitely want to check this book out.
KrittersRamblings More than 1 year ago
Have you ever wanted to go behind the scenes on someone else's job? For some reason I love hearing what other people do and what they love and hate about their job. I am not quite tall enough to be a flight attendant, but I am intrigued by the lifestyle of their job. This book was the perfect read to hear the ins and outs, the positives and the negatives to this unique job. As a flight attendant Heather Poole has experienced a far share of the crazies - from celebrities to your average person crazy! Her format to the book, going chronologically and even by subject matter was entertaining and easy to follow. She didn't a great job of sharing stories without throwing anyone under the bus, I didn't mind the vague details when it came to names of people, places or the airline carrier. It didn't affect the hilarious stories that she shared. What can happen 35,000 feet in the air? After reading this book, anything! I would recommend this book to those who travel constantly for a living or those who only travel every so often, each of us can find the humor in the customer service situations that she is thrust into on a daily basis.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Interesting information. The world of airline crews is crazy! Book was written "just okay" but the intrigue kept me going.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Heather should stick to her day job. Her writing style targets the average intelligence of a 10 year old. The in-flight magazine is more interesting than this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great read!!
Trishinomaha More than 1 year ago
This book was a lot of fun - which is why I think the author wrote it. Not great literature but still a fun look behind the curtain if you fly a lot. I give it a thumbs up!
alexia561 More than 1 year ago
While I'm not usually a fan of memoirs or non-fiction, this one sounded intriguing enough to give it a try. And it didn't hurt that I once considered becoming a flight attendant. Never got past picking up an application, but Heather walked me through the entire process and showed me what I missed! Really enjoyed this book as reading it was like hanging out with a friend. A very funny friend. With a very interesting life. It was more a conversation than a dry recital of her experiences, which made this a fun read! While I knew that flight attendants were more than the glorified waitresses that comedians make fun of, I had no idea just how intense their training was or how difficult their schedules actually were. I know that I'll never look at a flight attendant the same way ever again, and I have a new-found respect for them! But what's really cool about this book is that Heather makes her job sound fun! Despite the crazy passengers and exhausting schedule and the difficulty in maintaining relationships, it still sounds like an amazing adventure! So glad that she pulled back the galley curtain to give us a glimpse into her world, as it's a wild, wacky ride!
fabioc More than 1 year ago
The idea sounds great but the execution is very poor. Well, the writing style does read like gossips exchanged among attendants by the galley. Mindless.
itbgc on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
If you¿ve ever wondered what it would be like to be a flight attendant, this is the book for you. The author hooked me right away with her friendly, chatty style. I loved hearing all the details of her career and personal life down to what she wore and where she slept. Although glamorous in some ways, this job is really tough, especially for the newbies. Sometimes I felt the author was far too whiny (which is understandable), but overall, I do recommend the book.
varielle on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Working in the aviation industry I can sympathize with the working stiffs of the sky. This is an insider¿s look at the gritty and glorious world of the flight attendant. Weird things happen in the sky and people are often at the worst when fear and alcohol meet. It¿s easy to observe and analyze passengers when you are cooped up together for hours on end. Although the narrative bounces around a bit (dare we say flighty?), it¿s in keeping with the energy level that flight attendants have to maintain and project. This is a good read for seasoned travelers, those considering an airline career and those who want to chuckle at or with the sky folks.
bruce_krafft on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book was a good read, I didn¿t want to put it down, but it¿s not a book like Three Cups of Tea where you want to tell everyone you meet that they have to read the book, but still quite the page turner.I give her credit for talking about her co-workers but not in such a way that you would be wondering if the next flight attendant you say was `the one that . . . ¿I must say that hope that I am a person who appreciates people who serve me. I look the busboy in the eye and thank him when he picks up my plate. We tip well, because as one of my sister-in-law says the extra couple of bucks means nothing to her, but probably means a lot to a server (not just monetary.) Servers remember us and that makes the experience even better. You really do learn a lot of stuff about being a flight attendant that you didn¿t know previously and if you don¿t respect them more after reading this book then I don¿t know what to say.
pw0327 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I don't know how I came upon Heather Poole and her blog. I think I must have stumbled upon it when I was starting to use Twitter. She wrote about air travel and I traveled by air quite a bit, so I figured I can get some cool tidbits. Over time I came to appreciate her sense of humor and the earnestness she put into her work. And I did enjoy peekeing behind the curtains a bit, much as I did with Tony Bourdain's Kitchen Confidential.The book is structured chronologically, it is essentially her Flight Attendant career in sequence, from initial training to where she is now, well, actually to where she was a couple of years ago. I think she may have written the book in that sequence as well. The early chapters were a little hard to follow because the writing comes at you fast and furious. The book has a very breathless and immediate quality to it, like your BFF telling everything that you wanted to know. That breathlessness eased and the book got better and better as the later chapters came around. By the end of the book I was riveted to the apges because of the stories she was telling. Believe me, they were pretty juicy stories.Even though I am fully cognizant of the fact that I am getting the Flight Attendant side of the story with regard to the airline industry, pilots, and passengers, it made me very much more aware of the inequities that exists in the airline industry and how little the flight attendants have in their control. the training, advancement, and pre-historic compensation and seniority system is a real shock to the system. The stories of their working condition is on a par with Upton Sinclair's The Jungle. The main difference being that we, the general public has some very unrealistic ideas about the glamour life that the airline employees lead. In addition, the stories about the people that she came in contact with in her daily exposure to the flying public gave me pause to think about all the times that I was irate or short with a flight attendant. I am now sheepishly regretting all the times that I was cross with them. After all, the ethos in the present commercial travel ethos is nothing like that portrayed in Pan Am series. In the post 9/11 world, things changed, some due to the terrorist threats, some due to the economic travails that the airlines were forced to endure post 9/11. Travel conditions now are what traveling by bus was like during the heyday of air travel.But most of the interesting stories come from the pilots, passengers, and other flight attendants that populate her universe. I did not realize that it was such a flying freak show up in the air, but it is. Bad behavior all around, but mostly on the part of the flying public. For some reason, bad behavior seem to be fine with otherwise sane and civilized human being. Perhaps it is the whole ritual of driving to the airport and having to go through that elaborate sequence of security checks before you pass muster to achieve the anointed status of being a passenger. Or it might be the previously exalted status of being able to afford to fly, but bad behavior seems to abound on the airplane. I have even noticed this in my own travels. But the stories in the book are far more interesting than mine.There are also points in the book where the author begin to go down some interesting paths for reflection and rumination. I particularly enjoyed her short reflection on the connections and disconnections that seem to come in great bunches in her line of work, and how easily broken those tenuous threads of connection are for her. I also really enjoyed reading about her thought about her own emotions as well as the forced retrenchment of the airline industry after 9/11. I would have liked to have read more of her own thoughts and opinions, but alas, the stories can't wait. Maybe in her next book.I really enjoyed the book, even though the pace seemed a bit hectic, but then again, that is a pace that one asosciates with air travel t
miyurose on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
For someone who ¿doesn¿t read memoirs¿, I¿ve picked up more than a few this year. This one drew my eye because I enjoy flying, and had absolutely no idea what a flight attendant¿s job was like.After finishing the book, I¿m fairly certain that I would never want to be a flight attendant. I never would have imagined a super-strict book camp, or the fact that for a long time, an attendant makes so little money they are lucky if they can afford to rent a room of their own, let alone an entire apartment. And we¿re not talking about the 70s or the 80s here ¿ when Poole became a flight attendant in 1995 she made $18,000. That number is even lower now, because attendants took a pay cut following 9/11.And it was the lifestyle that I found most intriguing about this book. We also get plenty of stories of crazy behavior, by both passengers and crew, but most of them are nothing we haven¿t already imagined for ourselves. The real meat is the life of the flight attendant. She does a pretty good job of explaining the system, but I¿m still not sure I completely understand it. The concept of being ¿on reserve¿ is ridiculously complicated. Being a commuting flight attendant also seems a bit complex.Overall, I found this to be not only interesting but very entertaining. Poole has a nice easy tone, and she seems like someone who would be fun to hang out with. The one pick I have about the book is that I think it could have been a little better organized. She goes off on a lot of tangents. Entertaining as they are, I think sometimes the reader can lose the theme of the chapter.If you like humorous memoirs, this is definitely one to pick up. I know I¿ll never look at a flight attendant quite the same way again.
ReviewsFromTheHeart on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I'm sure most of you have flown before and have had the opportunity at sometime to interact with a flight attendant. I think there are quite a few details we, as passengers, never consider when flying and that's just how hard of a job, flight attendants actually have. It takes more than a nicely dressed attendant who smiles graciously as you enter and sets about to make sure your flight is enjoyable.In the book, Cruising Attitude by Heather Poole, a reader is taken on a behind the scenes tour of what it takes to make it to a flight attendant. From the long and grueling training most don't pass, to the crazy stories of some of the things passengers expect while flying. Not to mention just where do they go in between flights, what happens when flights are delayed and what are some of the perks about being a flight attendant.Heather Poole has been a flight attendant for various airline companies in the past fifteen years and has seen it all. Things we would never think about but that people have tried, done and some have been arrested for. She shares some celebrity encounters without mentioning the names of just how some use their status and some are strictly just like us as passengers. I think for me the most unusual story is that flight attendants don't get paid until the plane leaves the gate, which means, when faced with delays, they aren't getting paid to hear our complaints. Another crazy story is one passenger who packed his deceased mother in a garment bag to get her to her final destination to avoid the exorbitant fees to have her shipped any other way.This book is packed with amazing and down-right shocking stories of just what a career in being a flight attendant really is like and for me, makes me appreciate what they do a whole lot more. Never will I see them the same after reading this great book. I received this book compliments of William Morrow, a division of Harper Collins Publishers for my honest review and LOVED it! This one rates a perfect 5 out of 5 stars in my opinion and look forward to sharing this one with my readers. If you're a frequent flyer or are just interested in what it takes to be a flight attendant, you'll definitely want to check this book out.
AnnieMod on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Flight attendants - they do nothing, travel around the world and wear nice clothes, right? Maybe people that do not travel think so but the reality is very different and most frequent travelers can tell you so. Heather Poole takes this one step further and gives the story of what it really is to be a flight attendant. Training, the first years, the first flights, the problems, the laughs, the cries - they all are in this book. The life of a fight attendant is not really different from that of anyone else... except that their hours are a bit weird. For at least half the book the author manages to amuse and entertain. And then things go downhill. From the entertaining and funny book that you started reading it turns into a repetitious whine fest. Just how many times should the reader be told that seniority is the most important thing in the profession (after the first 3 times, I was getting annoyed), that international crews look better because they sleep more and wear better clothes (but she had never been part of an international carrier so is this really so or does she see only what everyone else sees), the company she works for and the systems are not very nice (it is called a job - you signed for it, you do it), the money are never enough (yes, anyone that works can say the same), how hard it is these days to get to your base with all the overbooked flights and so on and so on. The details are interesting - the first time they are told. After that it gets really annoying. It's a good glimpse in the life and a lot of the stories are hilarious (and I had seen similar ones occasionally). The inside stories were priceless -- there is so much that people do not even think about and I start wondering how the airline companies do not end up canceling even more flights. But the book could have been made a lot better than it is now.
MaryinHB on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
MY THOUGHTSLOVED ITI have always thought that being a flight attendant would be extremely glamorous, with decent pay, but Heather Poole points out that the starting pay is not great, the hours are weird, you never know where you will end up and you pretty much learn to sleep anywhere. I adored the chatty style of the book and the stories are pretty hilarious. She recounts her training which is pretty impressive. The first job she gets is for a discount airline that has since vanished and I couldn't believe some of the details about unsafe the airplanes were for that carrier. Well, that was until my brother showed me a picture taken back in the 70's where there is a piece of plywood blocking the cockpit and the beverage service was an ice chest pushed though the aisle. She recounts how every flight attendant wanted to get that golden ticket for free airfare and just how difficult it was to achieve.I was really impressed that in all the times she has flown, there never was an major disasters except for the passengers. You will never take your seat belt off again after reading about turbulence and how many attended get hurt on the job this way. And then, there is the abuse by the airlines themselves towards their employees. That part was just dreadful. My favorite tale of hers when when the lead singer for her favorite rock band was on board. She didn't recognize him at all and triple checked the passenger list since the guy sitting in the seat was past his prime and looked nothing like her hero. I adore these inside tales so much. If you have read any of the Babylon books, you will truly love this one, even though Poole doesn't name names. Be sure to always be polite to your flight attendants, they have a rough job.
BrokenTeepee on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Heather Poole is a very easy to read author. Her light and breezy style takes her reader through the rigors of flight attendant training school and then into the (not so) friendly skies. The book was a lovely diversion from some of the heavier books I have been reading lately and it certainly brought a few chuckles to my day as I read it. Ms. Poole's experiences with discontented travelers are certainly entertaining but I certainly can feel for her as she is mistreated by overbearing and entitled fliers.Having flown in the good times (pre-9/11) and the bad (post 9/11) and in First Class and coach I have seen some of the behaviors she writes about although I have never been so obnoxious as to expect a flight attendant to wait on me hand and foot as some of her stories relate. Anyone with experience in the customer service industry will appreciate the people profiled as Ms. Poole's worst cases.Some of the explanations of how the industry works as to scheduling and the like gets a bit convoluted - I do feel for flight attendants in a way I did not before - and confusing. The break downs are necessary to the subsequent stories but I wonder if the reader confusion is worth the short tale after? I am sure that readers in the industry will be nodding their heads knowingly over the tales of bad living arrangements and questionable co-workers.All in all this was an enjoyable, light read to take my mind from meatier reads. Ms. Poole has an easy writing style and even when she is sharing tales of the worst of her customers she does it with generous warmth. It would be a great book to read, erm while flying. heh
Jenners26 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Brief DescriptionHeather Poole has been a flight attendant for 15 years (for an unnamed airline) and she's ready to give us the inside scoop on crazy passengers, the disjointed life of a flight attendant, the realities of a crashpad, and what its like to fly the "friendly skies" for a living.My ThoughtsI enjoy books that give you an insider's look at various professions, and the life of a flight attendant is one that was particularly appealing. Poole does a good job of conveying the weirdness and stress that is the life of a flight attendant ... so much so that it made me wonder why anyone would want to have this job. (Free flights, baby!) If you've ever thought that being a flight attendant was a glamourous job, think again. Not only does it make having a relationship next to impossible, but flight attendants seem to barely make a living wage. In addition, the job requires dealing with difficult people in a closed environment under a lot of stress. Still, Poole makes a good case for the career, which provides a host of unique experiences (both good and bad) that give flight attendants a life that is anything but normal and boring. Although the writing is bit clunky at times, the book moves along at a fast clip and focuses squarely on Poole's flight attendant experiences. I guarantee you'll never look at a flight attendant the same way again. Also, If you're considering pursuing a career as a flight attendant, I'd recommend reading this book first as it is very possible you will change your mind.
Morphidae on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I smiled and rolled my eyes at the goings-on of the crew and passengers. The insights into the "backstage" of flight attendants were fascinating. While a breezy read, it was a bit too episodic for me, perhaps because the author was a blogger first. Also, it is obvious this is a new author as the book needed tightening up. There were a lot of tangents. Recommended for those that like reading behind the scenes memoirs.
ponder on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Due to the nature of my work and being in a long distance relationship, I travel often. Poole¿s storytelling is an enjoyable glimpse into an often mysterious lifestyle for the average passenger. It elicits sympathy and envy at the same time. It is one thing to be in the customer service industry and something wholly different when you are locked in an aluminum bus at 25,000 ft. with the consumer. It was definitely worth the read.
knitwit2 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
An interesting look at the life of a flight attendant. Could have been a lot shorter, there was a lot of details that were redundant. She had bad landlords and high expectations from here employers - who doesn't?
bookchickdi on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I had just finished Heather Poole's memoir, Cruising Attitude: Tales of Crashpads, Crew Drama, and Crazy Passengers at 35,000 Feet, when the news broke about the Jet Blue pilot who had a breakdown on his flight from New York to Las Vegas. After reading Heather's book, you kind of understood how this happened.Poole began her career on a regional airline, SunJet, that offered a $69 flight from Dallas to Newark, Ft. Lauerdale and Long Beach. The airline was often filled with unattended minors shuttling back and forth between parents and grandparents, and one flight Poole flew had 12 unattended minors. She joked that the planes were literally held together with duct tape on seats, in the galley, etc.She eventually moved on to a bigger airline, and she gives the reader a fascinating insight to the world of flight attendants. The first step was flight attendant school, or as Poole called it 'Barbie Boot Camp', which lasted for two months. Each day, fewer and fewer people would be at school; it reminded me of Demi Moore in the movie G.I. Jane, where recruits would disappear without a word.Poole made a good friend in Georgia, a gorgeous Southern belle who had always dreamed of being an flight attendant. Her roommate was a Texas gal named Linda, who was a grandmother. Heather had her doubts about Linda, but they became friends too.I learned many interesting facts about flight attendants. For example, they do not get paid until the plane backs away from the gate. While you're boarding and they are welcoming you and helping with your bags, they are not being paid. I think that is just plain wrong.They must find crashpads to stay in, usually rented rooms in homes near their base airport. Heather and Georgia lived in a home owned by a Russian cabbie, where they shared a room with four other women, and there were three other bedrooms set up in similar fashion upstairs. And only one bathroom. It sounds almost like living on a submarine to me. (In fact, some people did have a bed-sharing agreement, like a submarine.)There were even some flight attendants who lived in RVs in the employee parking lots at JFK airport.Poole attempts to explain the reserve system, which sounded like the equivalent of hospital residents on-call system, but I didn't quite understand all of the intricacies of it. It is very involved, and the first time Heather was called to work on reserve, she messed it up and almost got fired, as she was on probation and could be fired for any small infraction.In the 1970s, flight attendants averaged 18 months of employment, because they must be single and childless. Today, they last either a few months or an entire lifetime; there seems to be no middle ground.Most attendants take the job for the travel passes; the ability to fly for free or for a very reduced rate. They can also have a few family members or friends fly for free. For the low pay and sometime abusive conditions, I'm not sure it's worth it. (Some of her stories of horrible passengers made me cringe. How can human beings act like that?)Poole is a terrific writer; her book reads like a good novel. She tells her story with humor and pathos, and there's even some tension thrown in for good measure. I raced through the book, and it gave me a new appreciation for flight attendants.One thing she said that stuck with me is that flight attendants appreciate hearing a "please" or "thank you". I think that it is only fitting that I end by saying 'thank you' to Heather Poole for writing this informative and entertaining memoir.
SeriousGrace on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
When I first picked up Cruising Attitude I did so remembering (with fondness) the male flight attendant who admonished smokers with this, "You are welcome to smoke on this flight. Please do so in the fresh air. There's a spot for you on the right wing."Was this something I just couldn't put down? I thought the writing was uncomplicated and easy and definitely entertaining, but I wasn't obsessed with getting to the next chapter. Was this something that had me spellbound through each and every sentence? Not really. I found it cute, but even snarky at times so it had bite to it. I didn't laugh out loud, but I did giggle on occasion. Did I believe every story? I guess so. There really wasn't a reason to doubt her...or really care if I was duped by a good yarn spinner. I did have a few ah-ha moments as if Poole cleared up a few great mysteries for me. Mysteries I never knew confounded me. Those ah-ha moments were mostly related to airline stewardess behavior - like when they insist on greeting (or saying goodbye) to every passenger using a different phrase. It's like they spent the last hour of the flight reading the slang thesaurus in the bathroom "(buh-bye, so long, see ya, g'bye, so long).My only real "complaint" (and this is a tiny one) is the lack of flow and organization of stories. It's as if Poole is thinking outloud, trying to cram in as much as possible, and as a result her writing jumps around from thought to thought. The best example of this is when Poole dishes on famous and/or wealthy people's behavior in flight. It's two pages of "see if you can guess which celebrity did this obnoxious thing."All in all I liked Cruising Attitude and if Poole's motive for writing it was to enlighten passengers who fly the friendly skies, it worked. I will never look at flight attendants the same way again.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Held my interest in most chapters..some filler fluff. Since I've been flying since 1954 knew much of the details. Not all Airline personal 'care' about PAYING CUSTOMERS IN COACH. Too often we are like cattle, herded on board, seated in too small a space, not enough clean air or water, extreme tempatures. Yelled at if we ask for any courtesy they deem an extra favor. Forced to remain in our seats where infection or blood clots can actually kill you... Kicked or kneed in the back because the airline squeezes in one more row of seats. The only drinks available are luke warm and carry germs... We are million milers on AA but counts for nada... The Great Bus Ride In the Sky would be a truthful title.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is just sad & pathetic. Who would want to be a flight attendant after reading this miserable accounting of the job. Her vocabulary & writing skills are that of maybe a 13 yr.old. It's a shame that no one helped her polish this poor book & more of a shame that she didn't realize she needed a much better job sooner to have a better life.