×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Dangerous Planet: Natural Disasters That Changed History
     

Dangerous Planet: Natural Disasters That Changed History

by Bryn Barnard
 

See All Formats & Editions

Did a meteorite wipe out the dinosaurs and allow for human evolution? Did an earthquake usher in the rise of Greek civilization? Did a snowstorm help create the New York subway? The answer to all these questions is a resounding yes! Over and over again, natural disasters have influenced the course of human history in ways great and small. From the Great Fire of London

Overview

Did a meteorite wipe out the dinosaurs and allow for human evolution? Did an earthquake usher in the rise of Greek civilization? Did a snowstorm help create the New York subway? The answer to all these questions is a resounding yes! Over and over again, natural disasters have influenced the course of human history in ways great and small. From the Great Fire of London to the Great Kanto Quake, Bryn Barnard describes ten key moments when natural disasters have played a significant role in shaping our history. Highlighted with vivid and meticulously researched illustrations, Dangerous Planet demonstrates the mighty force of planet Earth–and the role humanity must play in its survival

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Rather than use a mixture of photographs and paintings, artist Barnard has chosen to illustrate the major disasters he covers in full color dramatic paintings. Each one gets a 3 to 4 page discussion, locator map with a key specific to the discussion, and several pictures. Disasters include the probable asteroid that caused the dinosaur extinction, a Minoan tsunami, the two huge storms that saved Japan from Kublai Khan's invasion, the Great Fire of London, the Blizzard of 1888 (to which Jim Murphy devoted an entire book, referred to in the bibliography), a Japanese earthquake in 1923, and several others. Barnard is given to zippy headings that may entice some while putting others off ("Sayonara to all that" reads one introducing the Japanese disaster. "Whoops" and "You must try the rat flamb�" appear in the discussion of the Great Fire of London.). However, these catchy headings serve to break up the lengthy but involving text into visually manageable chunks. What Barnard does best, however, is to satisfy the reader's desire to read about geologic upheavals in all of their angry hugeness while explaining the human cost, the aftermath, and what resulted later, such as all brick buildings, better codes for earthquake prevention, fireproofing, etc. Annoyingly, there's no table of contents or index. However, a glossary, two bibliographies (one for younger and one for older readers), web sites, and the wonderful discovery of the dedication to another children's book writer, "William Pene du Bois, whose twenty-one balloons got me started," make this book a treat to read, disaster by disaster. 2003, Crown, Ages 9 to 14.
— Susan Hepler, Ph.D.
School Library Journal
Gr 5-9-An interesting look at nine disasters. The readable text describes each occurrence and discusses how the course of history was affected by it, and to what degree. Events range from the devastating asteroid impact some 65 million years ago to the kamikaze winds that foiled invasions of Japan in 1274 and 1281 and the apocalyptic storm that staggered Edward III's army on the fields of France in 1360. Colorful illustrations, many full page, accompany the text, which ends with the what-if effects of global warming. A slim, oversized serving of food for thought-and for meaningful classroom discussions.-Patricia Manning, formerly at Eastchester Public Library, NY Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780449814932
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
11/28/2012
Sold by:
Random House
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
48
File size:
10 MB
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Bryn Barnard has illustrated many books for children and has reconstructed numerous natural disasters for Time-Life and the National Geographic Society.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews