Death from the Skies!: The Science Behind the End of the World

Death from the Skies!: The Science Behind the End of the World

by Philip Plait Ph.D.

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781101078785
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 10/16/2008
Sold by: Penguin Group
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 336
Sales rank: 985,073
File size: 2 MB
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Phil Plait, Ph.D. is a NASA-funded research astronomer with more than ten years of professional experience. He has written astronomy articles for magazines such as Astronomy, Muse, and Space Illustrated, and has been published in the Boston Globe. Plait has appeared on national radio and TV programs, including the Sci-Fi Channel’s “Countdown to Doomsday” documentary.

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

"[Plait] describes each doomsday scenario with glee. . . . Yet for all that, his book is strangely comforting."
-The Washington Post Book World

" A surprisingly upbeat look at all the ways the universe can destroy us . . . Eminently readable."
-Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

"The enthusiasm Plait has for his subject is not any morbid fascination with the upcoming bang or whimper, but with how much we know now about the universe around us, and he conveys this enthusiasm with pages full of wonder."
-The Commercial Dispatch

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

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Death from the Skies!: These Are the Ways the World Will End... 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 28 reviews.
MarinaTan More than 1 year ago
Very good, comprehensive guide over the "end of world". Loved the sense of humor, scientific approach and logic of the story. However, I think it was a little too simplified in some parts of the book, giving a feeling that author was writing for mid/high school students, but overall impression is very nice. Also, it was interesting to finally learn why "Armageddon" type solution was a bad idea... I always thought so, now I have an answer.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Could happen. In fact, probably will. Plait is the awesome astronomer behind "Bad Astronomy". Check him out.
SatansParakeet on LibraryThing 28 days ago
Ever want to know all the ways that the universe is trying to kill you and which ways are most likely to succeed? Then this is the book for you! Phil Plait does an excellent job of putting together a list of the astronomical dangers around us and he does it in a way that is very accessible to the lay reader. He even adds enough humor to the mix to keep it from becoming too depressing. I had to ding him a star for constantly assuming I'd be afraid of the end of life in the universe when that doesn't really bother me at all, but that's a common mistake to make. It may even be true for most people and he wasn't writing the book just for me. So I'll leave him with a respectable four star rating.
FrostKitty on LibraryThing 28 days ago
I pre-ordered this book then sat down and read it in one sitting when it arrived!
bluesalamanders on LibraryThing 28 days ago
A Very Brief History of the UniverseIn the beginning, there was nothing. Then there was everything.Subtitled "The Science Behind the End of the World...", Death from the Skies! is a book describing (in sometimes terrifying detail) all the ways that the universe is trying to kill us. Gamma-ray bursts, black holes, solar flares, asteroids, the myriad ways that things outside of Earth can destroy us.Also, just how phenomenally unlikely it is for any of those to happen any time soon. They're all going to happen. Just not in a time scale that we need to worry about. Mostly. Anyway, there's even a chart in the back!It's entertaining to read (for all it's also incredibly creepy) and written in a conversation style that I find accessible and enjoyable.
Spiceca on LibraryThing 28 days ago
Wow- what a read and what a way to knock humanities hubris down by about 10³. This book underlays the fascinating ways that our universe is trying to kill us. It starts with asteroids on up to the end of the entire universe (yes- it is inevitable but not for a very very very long time). Dr. Plait keeps a very conversational tone throughout the book which along with his "dumbing" down but not so dumb scientific explanations keep this book very easy to read but also doesn't make you feel dumb.On top of this being about all the apocalyptic ways our world can end- there is a lot of good science explained quite simply (well about as simply as one can explain how a black hole works). I enjoyed learning about the wide (to significantly under-exaggerate things) area we call space and would recommend to anyone interested in science, astronomy or even the doom factor.
juanjux on LibraryThing 28 days ago
Amazing book, the best for-public-consumption anstronomy book I've ever read, and I've read a lot. Philip Plait is the new Carl Sagan.
callmecayce on LibraryThing 28 days ago
It's taken me months to read this, not for any good reason. Death from the Skies is a fantastic book about all the ways the universe is trying to kill us. It's not morbid, instead it's awesome.
Arthwollipot on LibraryThing 28 days ago
Excellent book, and not at all frightening or depressing. If you ever wondered how many ways you could be killed by the universe, this book will enlighten you. It will tell you exactly how likely you are to be killed by an asteroid strike, or by a gamma ray burst, or a supernova. The good news is that the odds are quite good. The bad news is all the different ways that will inevitably kill you, assuming you last that long in the first place. Phil Plait's second book is great. A fantastic read. It's intellectually stimulating and informative, and given that it's Phil Plait, predictably fact-based. If you have any interest in science, astronomy or cosmology, you should read this book.
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