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Overview

The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank

Discovered in the attic in which she spent the last years of her life, Anne Frank’s remarkable diary has since become a world classic—a powerful reminder of the horrors of war and an eloquent testament to the human spirit. 

In 1942, with Nazis occupying Holland, a thirteen-year-old Jewish girl and her family fled their home in Amsterdam and went into hiding. For the next two years, until their whereabouts were betrayed to the Gestapo, they and another family lived cloistered in the “Secret Annex” of an old office building. Cut off from the outside world, they faced hunger, boredom, the constant cruelties of living in confined quarters, and the ever-present threat of discovery and death. In her diary Anne Frank recorded vivid impressions of her experiences during this period. By turns thoughtful, moving, and amusing, her account offers a fascinating commentary on human courage and frailty and a compelling self-portrait of a sensitive and spirited young woman whose promise was tragically cut short.

Praise for The Diary of a Young Girl

“A truly remarkable book.”The New York Times

“One of the most moving personal documents to come out of World War II.”The Philadelphia Inquirer

“There may be no better way to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of the end of World War II than to reread The Diary of a Young Girl, a testament to an indestructible nobility of spirit in the face of pure evil.”Chicago Tribune

“The single most compelling personal account of the Holocaust . . . remains astonishing and excruciating.”The New York Times Book Review

“How brilliantly Anne Frank captures the self-conscious alienation and naïve self-absorption of adolescence.”Newsday

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780385480338
Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date: 02/28/1996
Edition description: Definitive Edition
Pages: 352
Sales rank: 125,074
Product dimensions: 5.20(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.80(d)

About the Author

Anne Frank was born in 1929 in Germany. Her family moved to Amsterdam in 1933, and she died in the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in 1945.

Read an Excerpt

June 12, 1942

I hope I will be able to confide everything to you, as I have never been able to confide in anyone, and I hope you will be a great source of comfort and support.

Comment added by Anne on September 28, 1942:

So far you truly have been a great source of comfort to me, and so has Kitty, whom I now write to regularly. This way of keeping a diary is much nicer, and now I can hardly wait for those moments when I'm able to write in

you.

Oh, I'm so glad I brought you along!

Sunday, June 14, 1942

I'll begin from the moment I got you, the moment I saw you lying on the table among my other birthday presents. (I went along when you were bought, but that doesn't count.)

On Friday, June 12, I was awake at six o'clock, which isn't surprising, since it was my birthday. But I'm not allowed to get up at that hour, so I had to control my curiosity until quarter to seven. When I couldn't wait any longer, I went to the dining room, where Moortje (the cat) welcomed me by rubbing against my legs.

A little after seven I went to Daddy and Mama and then tothe living room to open my presents, and you were the first thing I saw, maybe one of my nicest presents. Then a bouquet of roses, some peonies and a potted plant. From Daddy and Mama I got a blue blouse, a game, a bottle of

grape juice, which to my mind tastes a bit like wine (after all, wine is made from grapes), a puzzle, a jar of cold cream, 2.50 guilders and a gift certificate for two books. I got another book as well, Camera Obscura (but Margot already has it, so I exchanged mine for something else), a platter of homemade cookies (which I made myself, of course, since I've become quite an expert at baking cookies), lots of candy and a strawberry tart from Mother. And a letter from Grammy, right on time, but of course that was just a coincidence.

Then Hanneli came to pick me up, and we went to school. During recess I passed out cookies to my teachers and my class, and then it was time to get back to

work. I didn't arrive home until five, since I went to gym with the rest of the class. (I'm not allowed to take part because my shoulders and hips tend to get dislocated.) As it was my birthday, I got to decide which game my classmates

would play, and I chose volleyball. Afterward they all danced around me in a

circle and sang "Happy Birthday." When I got home, Sanne Ledermann was already there. Ilse Wagner, Hanneli Goslar and Jacqueline van Maarsen came home with me after gym, since we're in the same class. Hanneli and Sanne used to be my two best friends. People who saw us together used to say, "There goes Anne, Hanne and Sanne." I only met Jacqueline van Maarsen when I started at the Jewish Lyceum, and now she's my best friend. Ilse is Hanneli's best friend, and Sanne goes to another school and has friends there.

They gave me a beautiful book, Dutch Sagas and Legends, but they gave me Volume II by mistake, so I exchanged two other books for Volume I. Aunt Helene brought me a puzzle, Aunt Stephanie a darling brooch and Aunt Leny a terrific book: Daisy Goes to the Mountains.

This morning I lay in the bathtub thinking how wonderful it would be if I had a dog like Rin Tin Tin. I'd call him Rin Tin Tin too, and I'd take him to school with me, where he could stay in the janitor's room or by the bicycle racks when the weather was good.

Monday, June 15, 1942

I had my birthday party on Sunday afternoon. The Rin Tin Tin movie was a big hit with my classmates. I got two brooches, a bookmark and two books.

I'll start by saying a few things about my school and my class, beginning with the students.

Betty Bloemendaal looks kind of poor, and I think she probably is. She lives on some obscure street in West Amsterdam, and none of us know where it is. She does very well at school, but that's because she works so hard, not because she's so smart. She's pretty quiet.

Jacqueline van Maarsen is supposedly my best friend, but I've never had a real friend. At first I thought Jacque would be one, but I was badly mistaken.

D.Q.

Initials have been assigned at random to those persons who prefer to remain anonymous.

is a very nervous girl who's always forgetting things, so the teachers keep assigning her extra homework as punishment. She's very kind, especially to G.Z.

E.S. talks so much it isn't funny. She's always touching your hair or fiddling with your buttons when she asks you something. They say she can't stand me, but I don't care, since I don't like her much either.

Henny Mets is a nice girl with a cheerful disposition, except that she talks in a loud voice and is really childish when we're playing outdoors. Unfortunately, Henny has a girlfriend named Beppy who's a bad influence on her because she's dirty and vulgar.

J.R.--I could write a whole book about her. J. is a detestable, sneaky, stuck-up, two-faced gossip who thinks she's so grown-up. She's really got Jacque under her spell, and that's a shame. J. is easily offended, bursts into tears at the slightest thing and, to top it all off, is a terrible show-off.

Miss J. always has to be right. She's very rich, and has a closet full of the most adorable dresses that are way too old for her. She thinks she's gorgeous, but she's not. J. and I can't stand each other.

Ilse Wagner is a nice girl with a cheerful disposition, but she's extremely finicky and can spend hours moaning and groaning about something. Ilse likes me a lot. She's very smart, but lazy.

Hanneli Goslar, or Lies as she's called at school, is a bit on the strange side. She's usually shy--outspoken at home, but reserved around other people. She blabs whatever you tell her to her mother. But she says what she

thinks, and lately I've come to appreciate her a great deal.

Nannie van Praag-Sigaar is small, funny and sensible. I think she's nice. She's pretty smart. There isn't much else you can say about Nannie.

Eefje de Jong is, in my opinion, terrific. Though she's only twelve, she's quite the lady. She acts as if I were a baby. She's also very helpful, and I

like her.

G.Z. is the prettiest girl in our class. She has a nice face, but is kind of

dumb. I think they're going to hold her back a year, but of course I haven't

told her that.

Comment added by Anne at a later date:

To my great surprise, G.Z. wasn't held back a year after all.

And sitting next to G.Z. is the last of us twelve girls, me.

There's a lot to be said about the boys, or maybe not so much after all.

Maurice Coster is one of my many admirers, but pretty much of a pest.

Sallie Springer has a filthy mind, and rumor has it that he's gone all the way. Still, I think he's terrific, because he's very funny.

Emiel Bonewit is G.Z.'s admirer, but she doesn't care. He's pretty boring.

Rob Cohen used to be in love with me too, but I can't stand him anymore. He's an obnoxious, two-faced, lying, sniveling little goof who has an awfully high opinion of himself.

Max van de Velde is a farm boy from Medemblik, but a decent sort, as Margot would say.

Herman Koopman also has a filthy mind, just like Jopie de Beer, who's a terrible flirt and absolutely girl-crazy.

Leo Blom is Jopie de Beer's best friend, but has been ruined by his dirty mind.

Albert de Mesquita came from the Montessori School and skipped a grade. He's

really smart.

Leo Slager came from the same school, but isn't as smart.

Ru Stoppelmon is a short, goofy boy from Almelo who transferred to this school in the middle of the year.

C.N. does whatever he's not supposed to.

Jacques Kocernoot sits behind us, next to C., and we (G. and I) laugh ourselves silly.

Harry Schaap is the most decent boy in our class. He's nice.

Werner Joseph is nice too, but all the changes taking place lately have made him too quiet, so he seems boring.

Sam Salomon is one of those tough guys from across the tracks. A real brat. (Admirer!)

Appie Riem is pretty Orthodox, but a brat too.

Saturday, June 20, 1942

Writing in a diary is a really strange experience for someone like me. Not only because I've never written anything before, but also because it seems to me that later on neither I nor anyone else will be interested in the musings of a thirteen-year-old schoolgirl. Oh well, it doesn't matter. I feel like writing, and I have an even greater need to get all kinds of things off my chest.

"Paper has more patience than people." I thought of this saying on one of those days when I was feeling a little depressed and was sitting at home with my chin in my hands, bored and listless, wondering whether to stay in or go out. I finally stayed where I was, brooding. Yes, paper does have more patience, and since I'm not planning to let anyone else read this stiff-backed notebook grandly referred to as a "diary," unless I should ever

find a real friend, it probably won't make a bit of difference.

Now I'm back to the point that prompted me to keep a diary in the first place: I don't have a friend.

Let me put it more clearly, since no one will believe that a thirteen-year-old girl is completely alone in the world. And I'm not. I have loving parents and a sixteen-year-old sister, and there are about thirty people I can call friends. I have a throng of admirers who can't keep their adoring eyes off me and whosometimes have to resort to using a broken pocket mirror to try and catch a glimpse of me in the classroom. I have a family, loving aunts and a good home. No, on the surface I seem to have everything, except my one true friend. All I think about when I'm with friends is having a good time. I can't bring myself to talk about anything but ordinary everyday things. We don't seem to be able to get any closer, and that's the problem. Maybe it's my fault that we don't confide in each other. In any case, that's just how things are, and unfortunately they're not liable to change. This is why I've started the diary.

To enhance the image of this long-awaited friend in my imagination, I don't want to jot down the facts in this diary the way most people would do, but I

want the diary to be my friend, and I'm going to call this friend Kitty.

Since no one would understand a word of my stories to Kitty if I were to plunge right in, I'd better provide a brief sketch of my life, much as I dislike doing so.

My father, the most adorable father I've ever seen, didn't marry my mother until he was thirty-six and she was twenty-five. My sister Margot was born in Frankfurt am Main in Germany in 1926. I was born on June 12, 1929. I lived in Frankfurt until I was four. Because we're Jewish, my father immigrated to Holland in 1933, when he became the Managing Director of the Dutch Opekta Company, which manufactures products used in making jam. My mother, Edith Hollander Frank, went with him to Holland in September, while Margot and I were sent to Aachen to stay with our grandmother. Margot went to Holland in December, and I followed in February, when I was plunked down on the table as a birthday present for Margot.

I started right away at the Montessori nursery school. I stayed there until I was six, at which time I started first grade. In sixth grade my teacher was Mrs. Kuperus, the principal. At the end of the year we were both in tears as we said aheartbreaking farewell, because I'd been accepted at the Jewish Lyceum, where Margot also went to school.

Our lives were not without anxiety, since our relatives in Germany were suffering under Hitler's anti-Jewish laws. After the pogroms in 1938 my two uncles (my mother's brothers) fled Germany, finding safe refuge in North America. My elderly grandmother came to live with us. She was seventy-three years old at the time.

After May 1940 the good times were few and far between: first there was the war, then the capitulation and then the arrival of the Germans, which is when the trouble started for the Jews. Our freedom was severely restricted by a series of anti-Jewish decrees: Jews were required to wear a yellow star; Jews were required to turn in their bicycles; Jews were forbidden to use streetcars; Jews were forbidden to ride in cars, even their own; Jews were required to do their shopping between 3 and 5 p.m.; Jews were required to frequent only Jewish-owned barbershops and beauty parlors; Jews were forbidden to be out on the streets between 8 p.m. and 6 a.m.; Jews were forbidden to go to theaters, movies or any other forms of entertainment; Jews were forbidden to use swimming pools, tennis courts, hockey fields or any other athletic fields; Jews were forbidden to go rowing; Jews were forbidden to take part in any athletic activity in public; Jews were forbidden to sit in their

gardens or those of their friends after 8 p.m.; Jews were forbidden to visit Christians in their homes; Jews were required to attend Jewish schools, etc. You couldn't do this and you couldn't do that, but life went on. Jacque always said to me, "I don't dare do anything anymore, 'cause I'm afraid it's not allowed."

In the summer of 1941 Grandma got sick and had to have an operation, so my birthday passed with little celebration. In the summer of 1940 we didn't do much for my birthday either, since the fighting had just ended in Holland. Grandma died in January1942. No one knows how often I think of her and still love her. This birthday celebration in 1942 was intended to make up for the others, and Grandma's candle was lit along with the rest.

The four of us are still doing well, and that brings me to the present date of June 20, 1942, and the solemn dedication of my diary. Saturday, June 20, 1942

Reading Group Guide

This guide is organized to help readers understand and reflect on Anne Frank's diary. Background information, time lines, and the glossary provide historical context for the years of Anne's life and are designed to place her diary within the framework of the events taking place during World War II and the Holocaust. Special details have been included to highlight the twenty-five month period during which Anne and her family hid in the Secret Annex, as well as the aftermath.

The study questions for students are arranged in three parts. The first set of questions relates to facets contributing to Anne's personal identity. The second set of questions examines the relationship of Anne to the world outside the Annex. The final set of questions considers the ongoing issues that Anne raised in her diary over fifty years ago. For additional educational materials, including teacher's notes and activities, please contact the Anne Frank Center USA, 584 Broadway, Suite 408, New York, NY, 10012.

1, a) After the Nazi invasion of the Netherlands in May 1940, the Dutch people were immediately faced with the question of choice: how to respond to the Nazi occupation. Tens of thousands of Dutch people followed Hitler, and millions more looked the other way. Eventually, a resistance movement began to grow. The Nazis needed Dutch collaborators to carry out their fascist decrees. What would have influenced someone to become a collaborator? What factors would have encouraged someone to join the resistance? Do you think these factors were based on personal characteristics or political beliefs? What was the price of resistance during the war? What was the price of collaboration? b) Anne Frank and her family were German refugees who resettled and tried to build their lives in the Netherlands. Although the Franks were proud of their German heritage, their feelings toward Germany became very complicated during the war. Anne wrote: "Fine specimens of humanity, those Germans, and to think I'm actually one of them! No. that's not true, Hitler took away our nationality long ago. And besides, there are no greater enemies on earth than the Germans and Jews." (October 9, 1942.) Although Anne had lived in the Netherlands since 1934, she did not become a Dutch citizen. Did Anne have a nationality? If not, were Anne's civil rights protected by any nation? By 1939 some 250,000 Jews, half of Germany's Jewish population, had fled their homeland. Did these refugees have any guaranteed rights? After the war Otto Frank responded to references to "the Germans" by asking "which German?" He believed strongly that blaming all Germans was another form of stereotyping. What constitutes a stereotype? How is a stereotype different from discrimination? c) In The New York Times the writer Anna Quindlen asked, "Would our understanding of the Holocaust be quite the same if Anne Frank had not taken a small plaid diary into hiding with her?" What has most shaped your understanding of World War II: personal experience, Anne's diary, popular films such as Schindler's List, newsreel footage, academic or historical texts? d) Otto Frank chose to edit out some of the negative comments Anne made about her mother and a number of the other residents of the Secret Annex--comments that have been restored in the new translation by Susan Massotty. He believed that Anne would have wanted him to do so. Do you think he was correct? e) In her diary Anne opined: "...if you're wondering if it's harder for the adults here than for the children, the answer is no...Older people have an opinion about everything and are sure of themselves and their actions. It's twice as hard for us young people to hold on to our opinions at a time when ideals are being shattered..." (July 15, 1944.) When was the last time as an adult that you experienced the "shattering" of an ideal? Is the media a neutral force, or do you think it plays a role in supporting or destroying idealism? f) Are there certain characteristics common among those few individuals who risked their own lives to rescue Jews during World War II? Why do so many of them deny their own heroism? g) A disturbing number of neo-Nazi groups have taken hold in all parts of the world. What social conditions would be necessary for them to grow? What do you believe would be the most likely basis of another world war: pride, nationalism, fear, racism, economic interests, or religious intolerance? h) Nazi leader Adolf Eichmann was asked how he could explain the killing of 6 million Jews. He answered, "One hundred dead are a catastrophe, a million dead are a statistic." Have we become more or less tolerant of murder since he made this observation? i) Anne Frank wrote: "I don't believe the war is simply the work of politicians and capitalists. Oh no, the common man is every bit as guilty; otherwise, people and nations would have rebelled long ago!" (May 3, 1944.) How should accountability be assigned? So many say they never understood what was happening. How likely could that have been? j) Hitler published Mein Kampf in 1925, describing his plan for the elimination of Jews. At that time, what steps might have been taken to stop Hitler's rise to power?

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The Diary of a Young Girl 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 860 reviews.
mothman More than 1 year ago
I love this book- at times I forgot that she was as young as she was, or that she wasn't even alive anymore. I felt like I new her, and she became a great friend of mine. It seemed to me that as she got more and more used to writing, it all seemed to come to her more and more naturally. There were some discussions- as innocent as they were- that she and Peter had near the end of the book. I found parts of it a bit awkward to read, seeing as she was so young and open about them, but as a kid myself I know it is a common occurrence in conversation. But, nevertheless, it was one of the few real diaries of the Holocaust that I have come across, and is also one of the best Holocaust books I have ever read. I honestly wish they would've survived and been able to marry. Every page holds some new meaning, or some new secret worry that Anne has to hide from everyone else. And she was so truthful to her diary! She admitted her hopes and fears, and even her angers and faults. When she found her roommate had a secret stash of goods he kept from everyone, I could practically feel her outrage! She described that weird old man so well- he was such a creep! He was probably a weird old pervert, and I'm sorry that she had to room with him. I can totally get the mother-daughter fighting thing, though I probably didn't get as mad, and I can never hold a grudge. Anne was right to hold out and keep true to herself, even though it seems no one in the world is willing to do that anymore- but if you're already in hiding and being persecuted for your religion. that's the same thing as being persecuted for your beliefs! Letting go would've been like turning away from your religion, and everything that the Jews fighting for freedom stood for. In short- I really liked it, and I would recommend this to anyone, for any occasion. It was a wonderful read, and I will never, ever forget it. It's a shame she didn't live to write more, it really is. Five stars- please, please, please- go read it!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Those of u who dont like it just dont you the story of what she went through. Learn more about her story then you still dont have room to criticize her. What would you be acting like if you were in hiding for two years? Yeah.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is definitely a must-read for all of you out there who want to get a glimpse into what it was like to be a Jew during WW2 in the Nazi occupied Europe...Anne opened an incredible window for us to look into the ordeal millions of Jewish lives went through because of the attrocities carried out by Hitler and his followers...The book is very genuine and a page turner...I definitely recommend it!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"Being different doesnt matter it makes YOU unique!"
najaha90 More than 1 year ago
"Don't judge the book by its cover." i thought the book was going to be about the girl on the book cover and i thought "boring" but really it wasn't boring at all. I think Anne's diary made the Holocaust real to me in a way that other books haven't because she is a normal teenage girl in a lot of ways. She's growing up, she dislikes her family and "roommates" one day and adores them the next. She's dreaming about the future, love, a career, and what she really wants out of life. She was funny, she was sad, she was thoughtful, she was growing, she was intelligent, she was scared, and she was BRAVE. I remember feeling all the things she describes. If she was still alive I would like to meet her, she is very empowering. this book taught me to appreciate and be thankful of what i have. RIP Anne
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is only 29 pages long. Do not purchase if you are looking for the full version. We needed the full book but not the definitive version for my kids in school. I purchased his thinking this was the correct version and wasted my money on a 29 page abridgement.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
U go anne forget all them haters the just dont understand its a pwrsonal diary not a novel duu so yall just need to: 1.cry me a river 2.build a bridge 3.get over it
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is one of the best diaries I have read. I couldn't put it down.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is not the most touching of the Holocaust stories in my opinion, but one thing sticks out: Anne lives more than we do today locked up in that annex. Her spirit refused to be calmed. She refused to stop studying. And while she has her sad and despairing moments, she refused to be stripped of one human right: the right to feel and act on the good and bad moments. Anne is a picture of a thriving human being in the worst of times. If she had lived, the world would still have known the name of Anne Frank.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is probaly the best book someone could ever read. Sureyou have Percy Jackson or Harry Potter but this is true. It is very good book. It tals about a jewish girl who is being, like other jews targetted. ( Even though HITLER was jewish ) It shows that she never gave up on anything. She is a true inspiration.
susieyoko More than 1 year ago
Do you remember how much this book affected you when you were 12? Well it still has that power for the current girls too.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Something I found very interesting about this book is that it’s not even really a book; it’s the diary of a teenage girl. I really enjoyed being able to be in the mind of a girl who needed to hide out for the longest time in an attic to save her life. You get to learn Anne’s dreams, love, hope, and all from her. You get to see what used to happen back in those times. But this does not have to be a history lesson, readers. This book goes on much more beyond just the history of it. It’s an amazing adventure that you feel as if you get to experience it with her. Although rather marvelous, this book is not for everyone. I will admit myself that I found certain times to be quite boring and rather dull. The book is also very complex, with being from that long ago, and will be challenging for some readers. With that said, I still encourage you to read the book for the enjoyment and the learning that comes with it, and have a fun time reading!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Read this book in 3rd grade ( im now in 4th) anyways, this book is truly amazing..... i wouldnt be able to survive 2 years in a small space... but avnyway this is amazinng . You really should read this insteald of those fake Holocaust books. This is the REAL deal people! I love how she expresses her thoughts& feelings.... its a shame she didnt live to see this book rise in fame. Happy reading, Sophia :)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It was such a good book that i cried! Why would someebody do that to jews? I dont understand they are like us but just a different religion? Ugh! But you know what i love ann frank she was the bomb even though i never met her. Any ways i am going to give this book a 5 because it deserves one
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this! If you don,t know you anne frank is..., she was a young, jewish girl who lived during the 1930-40s whan Hitler was sending jews to death camps. She went into hiding and the diary is all about that. READ IT!!! It is life-changing!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a story of hope, humanity, coming of age, and man's inhumanity to man. Read the book, understand that this book was originally written by a young girl making every attempt to grow up, to live, to love, to survive, to not lose faith, to not give up, to not go crazy.... it was written for the first 20 months or so with no intent on ever even letting anyone read the diary. It wasn't until a radio broadcast suggested that letters and diaries should be saved to tell the story of the survivors and those who sadly lost their lives. Anne Frank is one of 1.6 million Jewish children under the age of 16 who died at the hands of the german/Nazi's in an effort to promote ethnic cleansing. The definitive edition adds in pages and passages that a grieving father, with the deaths of his wife and children still quite fresh chose to remove based on the sensibilities and etiquette of the day ( 1940s no cell phones no internet no computers no tvs for the most part, chaperones present, ladies wore skirts or dresses and unmarried women didn't go into boys or mens rooms unchapperoned ...it was a different time). Otto Frank chose to remove the passages that showed his beloved wife in a derogatory manner, as well as , when Anne discusses menses, and her growing love for Peter. He removed the passages where she is discussing the changes to her body as she grows from a child into a young woman. This is by far the most comprehensive and thorough edition.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anne is a true role model for us. She was a brave young girl.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was so sad, I read this after reading the play verson with my class, and I have to say that the play left out a lot. Even though there were some parts I really didn't want to hear, I can't hate the book because it's a real girl's diary, that's like a girls inner most private parts. So even though we are invading her privicacy, we are helping her live after death , just like she wanted.
brit_95 More than 1 year ago
NAME OF THE AUTHER: Anne Frank NAME OF THE ILLUSTRATOR: ANNE Frank GENRE: NON-FICTION AGE RANGE: 14 AND OLDER AWARDS: WINNER-YALSA Best Books for Young Adults Anne Frank is often remembered as the little girl who wrote, "I still believe that people are really good at heart." In spite of all her suffering and loss, Anne still has hope and never gives up. She thinks that the people who are doing all the bad stuff, despite everything, are good somewhere inside them. Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl is an extraordinary autobiography. Anne Frank is a brave heart all the way through.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read a book called A Diary of a Young Girl. This was Anne Frank's diary. I loved reading it. I coundn't put the book down. I also couldnt believe that I was reading her words. I felt like I was there with her. Well this book was about her and her family and how they went thoough rough times because they were Jewish. In her diary Anne writes how scared she was they she could be captured.Her mother, father and sister were also scared they could be captured and taken to consontration camps. Anne's mother and father were so scared so they took Anne and her sister to hide out in an old building hoping they wouldn't be found. But, they were. Anne took her diary to the consontration camp with her. Besides her and her family were split up. Anne told story's about the horrible things that happend to the other Jews. This went on for a long time. A few weeks before the camps let out Anne died.Anne's father is the one who published her diary. I really liked this book. If you enjoy reading about other peoples lives than this is the book for you.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved this book, but is sad,
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Adolf Hitler was a boy growing up in austria arount the early 1900's. As he walked wiyh his mom to places like the market, he noticed ajewish girl and her mom. The mom picked up a tomato, and quickly put it in her purse and went off. Ever since then, adolf hated jews. Then he started giving speeches about the experience that he had senen happen. People became practily hipmatized and started treating inocent jewish people like dirt. He later became very redpected and hinored. I can make a LIFE AS A JEW bio if i get three people to coment on this biol. Please reply to Hailee. Thanks!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The memoir Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl is an interesting and important book that I found very remarkable. Its very informative on how Anne, her family, and friends went into hiding from the Nazi war and how they survived from what little they had. Although they didn’t survive in hiding and got caught and taken to a concentration camp, Anne and her family had hopes and beliefs. Even though they were in a stressful event, they remained calm and focused. I recommend this book because its important to history. However, this book can be long and hard to read. Overall, I believe this book is a good piece of history and worth reading.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
There was another result of this book saying Anne Frank was a hoax. She was a real person that suffered through the Holocaust. Who else agrees with me?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It is really interesting to read about what during the Holocaust from the perspective of someone close to my age. The book took you into the story like you were actually there. It was a little boring in the middle of the book but that’s understandable because it's real and wasn't meant for action, it’s an autobiography. I liked reading about how she went from having such an easy life, to living in hiding, and rationing food. I would recommend this book to anyone who is interested in this time period.