Dixie Highway: Road Building and the Making of the Modern South, 1900-1930

Dixie Highway: Road Building and the Making of the Modern South, 1900-1930

by Tammy Ingram

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Overview

Dixie Highway: Road Building and the Making of the Modern South, 1900-1930 by Tammy Ingram

At the turn of the twentieth century, good highways eluded most Americans and nearly all southerners. In their place, a jumble of dirt roads covered the region like a bed of briars. Introduced in 1915, the Dixie Highway changed all that by merging hundreds of short roads into dual interstate routes that looped from Michigan to Miami and back. In connecting the North and the South, the Dixie Highway helped end regional isolation and served as a model for future interstates. In this book, Tammy Ingram offers the first comprehensive study of the nation's earliest attempt to build a highway network, revealing how the modern U.S. transportation system evolved out of the hard-fought political, economic, and cultural contests that surrounded the Dixie's creation.

The most visible success of the Progressive Era Good Roads Movement, the Dixie Highway also became its biggest casualty. It sparked a national dialogue about the power of federal and state agencies, the role of local government, and the influence of ordinary citizens. In the South, it caused a backlash against highway bureaucracy that stymied road building for decades. Yet Ingram shows that after the Dixie Highway, the region was never the same.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781469629827
Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press
Publication date: 08/01/2016
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 272
Sales rank: 902,876
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.20(h) x 0.80(d)

About the Author

Tammy Ingram is assistant professor of history at the College of Charleston.

Table of Contents


At the turn of the twentieth century, good highways eluded most Americans and nearly all southerners. Introduced in 1915, the Dixie Highway changed all that by merging hundreds of short roads into dual interstate routes that looped from Michigan to Miami and back. In connecting the North and the South, the Dixie Highway helped end regional isolation and served as a model for future interstates. In this book, Tammy Ingram offers the first comprehensive study of the nation's earliest attempt to build a highway network, revealing how the modern U.S. transportation system evolved out of the hard-fought political, economic, and cultural contests that surrounded the Dixie's creation.

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From the Publisher

Although historians have previously examined the Good Roads Movement, scholars of the early twentieth-century South have long awaited a fully contextualized study of road building. Dixie Highway provides the most comprehensive study that we have today of the Good Roads Movement and its consequences. This will be essential reading for students of the modern South.—William A. Link, author of Atlanta, Cradle of the New South: Race and Remembering in the Civil War's Aftermath

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