Dragon's Fire

Dragon's Fire

by Emily Martha Sorensen

NOOK Book(eBook)

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Overview

Dragon's Fire by Emily Martha Sorensen

When Rose decided to correct an arrogant woman about her wrongheaded belief that dragons were not intelligent, it resulted in an unexpected complication: now that woman wants a dragon egg of her own.

Hearing the news that two new eggs have awakened, Rose rushes with her dragon son to the museum in hopes of preventing such a catastrophe.

A 14,000 word G-rated new adult fantasy.

Product Details

BN ID: 2940158905315
Publisher: Emily Martha Sorensen
Publication date: 07/24/2017
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Sales rank: 1,059,306
File size: 344 KB

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Dragon's Fire 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a sweet series that really makes you think! Love Virgil and his family. What a cute idea!! Only complaint is how short they are. Seems like a bit much for 2.99. But love the story!
SherryF More than 1 year ago
The Dragon Egg Series by Emily Martha Sorensen is like no dragon story you have ever read and I am loving it. So much fun and creative writing that makes me angry and makes me smile all at the same time. Rose and Henry were chosen by Virgil. Their ‘arranged marriage’ may be a bit different, but it is working all the same. Imagine if your child had telepathic powers, knows your thoughts…and you know theirs…for example, they are a predator, so you would see all their ancestors grisly and gory eating habits, along with everything else they did. Virgil’s favorite toy is a bucket, whirling, spinning and bouncing off walls. I can’t help but laugh every time I picture it. Changing his diaper…no thanks. When Rose finds out more eggs are hatching, she worries for their future. We have all the political implications of an intelligent, but non human animal. Is a dragon to have the same rights as a human? Are they to be discriminated against? I surely want to stay tuned for their ongoing adventure and watch Virgil grow up. I voluntarily reviewed a free copy of Dragon’s Fire by Emily Martha Sorensen.
christinaraven More than 1 year ago
Another chapter in Rose and Henry's journey of parenting their dragon baby Virgil. Although a quick read, I find the series to still be highly entertaining. In this book, Virgil ends up going around town to visit his friend Violet at the zoo and back to the museum to visit another egg that has awakened. Since these stories take place in the 1920's it is always interesting when topics of the day end up in the story. Especially as Sorensen tends to make them a bit hilarious as it is mixed with the baby dragons. This time women's suffrage is present and made me giggle. I received a free copy and my honest review is that I find this to be a lighthearted quick read that is entertaining between Rose's views of life and a baby dragon with telepathy. Cannot wait to see what happens next.
rokinrev More than 1 year ago
[I received this book as a gift from the author. I voluntarily chose to review it] “But consequences or not, she had to speak. There were times when one could not afford to stay silent” Four month old Virgil wants everyone to know he likes to play, and if this 4 month old dragon doesn’t get his own way, he throws a temper tantrum. Rose and Henry Wainscott can barely keep him in chicken and diapers. And then Rose overhears a well heeled woman talking about the almost sentient next eggs, thinking that a dragon could replace a child, if you threw enough money around. But budding paleontologist Rose is going to make sure that will not happen. Intelligence is part of these beings, and so far Virgil and Violet have chosen their parents, and Crimson will choose next, because a “future that the dragon chose for himself would be better than any forced on him” This is the continuation of the journey of the Wainscotts and their Deinonychus antirrhopus dragon Virgil, who is too young to understand. Rose is trying to be a good mother. Henry seems to just watching the world pass by despite the changes that are happening around them. As usual, Emily Martha Sorensen tells a humorous “what if” story like few others can these days. Highly recommended.