Eric Williams and the Anticolonial Tradition: The Making of a Diasporan Intellectual

Eric Williams and the Anticolonial Tradition: The Making of a Diasporan Intellectual

by Maurice St. Pierre

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Overview

Eric Williams and the Anticolonial Tradition: The Making of a Diasporan Intellectual by Maurice St. Pierre

A leader in the social movement that achieved Trinidad and Tobago’s independence from Britain in 1962, Eric Williams (1911–1981) served as its first prime minister. Although much has been written about Williams as a historian and a politician, Maurice St. Pierre is the first to offer a full-length treatment of him as an intellectual. St. Pierre focuses on Williams's role not only in challenging the colonial exploitation of Trinbagonians but also in seeking to educate and mobilize them in an effort to generate a collective identity in the struggle for independence. Drawing on extensive archival research and using a conflated theoretical framework, the author offers a portrait of Williams that shows how his experiences in Trinidad, England, and America radicalized him and how his relationships with other Caribbean intellectuals—along with Aimé Césaire in Martinique, Juan Bosch in the Dominican Republic, George Lamming of Barbados, and Frantz Fanon from Martinique—enabled him to seize opportunities for social change and make a significant contribution to Caribbean epistemology.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780813936734
Publisher: University of Virginia Press
Publication date: 03/05/2015
Series: New World Studies Series
Pages: 272
Product dimensions: 5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.30(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Maurice St. Pierre, author of Anatomy of Resistance: Anti-Colonialism in Guyana, 1823–1966, is Professor Emeritus of Sociology and Anthropology at Morgan State University.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments ix

Introduction 1

1 Colonialism in Early Twentieth-Century Trinidad and Tobago: The Construction of a Socially Dishonored Status 11

2 Life Abroad: The Academic Intellectual and the Struggle for Credentialism 33

3 The Native Son Returns: The Public Intellectual and the Quest for Credibility 52

4 In Search of Relevance: The "University of Woodford Square" and the Political Party Paper 71

5 Exploiting the Political-Opportunity Structure: The Emergence of the People's National Movement Parry 88

6 From Pedantic Visionary to Elected Politician 116

7 The Bachacs Confront the "Hydra-Head" of Colonialism: The American Presence in Trinidad and Tobago 142

8 Caliban and the Anticolonial Tradition 171

Afterword: The Head That Wears the Crown Lies Uneasy 201

Notes 207

Selected Bibliography 231

Index 247

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