Faro's Daughter

Faro's Daughter

by Georgette Heyer
4.3 45

Paperback(Reprint)

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Overview

Faro's Daughter by Georgette Heyer

Beautiful Deborah Grantham, mistress of her aunt's elegant gaming house, must find a way to restore herself and her aunt to respectability, preferably without accepting either of two repugnant offers. One is from an older, very rich and rather corpulent lord whose reputation for licentious behavior disgusts her; the other from the young, puppyish scion of a noble family whose relatives are convinced she is a fortune hunter.

Max Ravenscar, uncle to her young suitor, comes to buy her off, an insult so scathing that it leads to a volley of passionate reprisals, escalating between them to a level of flair and fury that can only have one conclusion...

"My favourite historical novelist—stylish, romantic, sharp, and witty. Her sense of period is superb, her heroines are enterprising, and her heroes dashing. I owe her many happy hours." -Margaret Drabble

"Georgette Heyer is unbeatable." - Sunday Telegraph

"Sparkling." -Independent on Sunday

"A writer of great wit and style...I've read herbooks to ragged shreds." -Kate Fenton, Daily Telegraph

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781402213526
Publisher: Sourcebooks
Publication date: 07/01/2008
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 286
Sales rank: 174,247
Product dimensions: 5.20(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.80(d)

About the Author

The late Georgette Heyer was a very private woman. Her historical novels have charmed and delighted millions of readers for decades, though she rarely reached out to the public to discuss her works or private life. It is known that she was born in Wimbledon in August 1902, and her first novel, The Black Moth, was published in 1921.

Heyer published 56 books over the next 53 years, until her death from lung cancer in 1974. Heyer's large volume of works included Regency romances, mysteries and historical fiction. Known also as the Queen of Regency romance, Heyer was legendary for her research, historical accuracy and her extraordinary plots and characterizations. Her last book, My Lord John, was published posthumously in 1975. She was married to George Ronald Rougier, a mining engineer, and they had one son together, Richard.

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Faro's Daughter 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 45 reviews.
jca85 More than 1 year ago
Georgette Heyer is a true heir of Jane Austen - her characters charm and delight yet stay firmly in their time. Deb is no modern miss in a historical setting but lives firmly in her era but without a trace of miss-ishness. She is strong and firm-principled and delightful - and a well-matched opponent for the men who seek to force her into their own ideas of her future. Worth reading and re-reading and reading once again...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Gambling was huge in the Regency and this is about a woman who runs a gaming house. She also is courted by 2 very different men, one of whom is much too young for her. His uncle steps in to rescue him from this scheming woman, but falls for her himself. And this is after she kidnaps him and ties him in the cellar! Add a fiancee hiding from her horrible betrothed, and a pretty heiress. it all comes right in the end, of course, but the journey is so much fun!
rangerdragon More than 1 year ago
I am lately come to Georgette Heyer. I love her characters and her realism of the Regency period. This book takes a different look at part of this world. You know from the start in all of her books how it wil end, but the journey is so fine.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very good
AustenStudent More than 1 year ago
This is one of the most antagonistic historical romances I’ve ever read, but it is very enjoyable. The hero and heroine spend more time arguing than anything else, and this reminded me a little of Darcy and Elizabeth from Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. Is antagonism a sign of deep sexual attraction? Hmm… Max Ravenscar, a powerful and intelligent man, will never allow Miss Deb Grantham to marry his green and vulnerable cousin, Adrian, a rich young gentleman, even if Adrian is completely besotted with her. Deb works in her aunt’s gaming hell, an endeavor borne out of financial straits rather than by thoughtful choice. She’s crafty, intelligent, and devastatingly beautiful, and she has no intention of marrying an infatuated young boy like Adrian Mablethorpe. So she is outraged when Ravenscar threatens her. The nerve of the man to think her so cheap and conniving as to entrap an unsophisticated peer. He tries bribing her and that’s when she snaps. She’ll teach him a lesson he’ll never forget. Deb decides to lead Adrian on and during the course of the story, Deb and Adrian encounter a victimized young heiress fleeing from an older man her family insists she marry. This constitutes the secondary love story in the book and it’s more of a convenience than anything else. There is humor here but it is often biting and edgy. It often teeters toward the cold and malicious but never quite gets there. Which is a good thing, otherwise we would almost miss the hidden attraction between these two intelligent, stubborn, and proud individuals. The secondary characters are quite colorful and add some much needed lightness to this romance: Lady Mablethorpe, Adrian’s mother and Max’s aunt who is horrified at Adrian’s crush; Arabella, Max’s delightfully coquettish half sister; and Lucius Kennet, Deb’s well-meaning but vengeful friend. Laura Paton reads with a perfect drollness that matches the moods of the characters. The voices are distinguished and I especially enjoy her reading of the high-strung and nervous Aunt Bellingham. There is appropriately read emotion and antagonism between Deb and Max but sometimes it did make me cringe in its harshness. The innocence and naivete of Miss Laxton is captured well as are the voices of the lackeys of the gaming hell. Though scathing, the dialogue is a wonderfully large and engaging part of this battle of wits. We see both Deb and Max’s vulnerabilities and how each owns up to their mistakes and remedies them. The ending is especially lovely and makes up for all the hardship to get there. But there is never any doubt that this is an exceptionally well written and enjoyable story, especially when listened to read aloud. This review first appeared on Romantic Historical Reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
An acquired taste orefer her mysteries
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Okay, for the third time!!! Loved this story. Now please BN stop messing about and okay this!
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Over $10 now for ms. Heyer' s books and some are so full of errors they cant be read. Im not going to buy any more until the publishers fix. Others should do the same. We created a big demand and if it dries up maybe the publishing companies will take heed. Im no longer buying books that cost more than 7.99, and i think thats a little extreme for something that costs so little to publish. The books are apparently being rushed through now and there is apparently no quality control on the electronic versions.
fancynancy1 More than 1 year ago
I got this as a gift for a friend and I wish you could have seen her face. She grabbed a "spot of tea" and was promptly transported to Regency England as she started re-reading this delight.
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