Female Chauvinist Pigs: Women and the Rise of Raunch Culture

Female Chauvinist Pigs: Women and the Rise of Raunch Culture

by Ariel Levy
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Overview

Female Chauvinist Pigs: Women and the Rise of Raunch Culture by Ariel Levy

A classic work on gender culture exploring how the women’s movement has evolved to Girls Gone Wild in a new, self-imposed chauvinism. In the tradition of Susan Faludi’s Backlash and Naomi Wolf’s The Beauty Myth, New York Magazine writer Ariel Levy studies the effects of modern feminism on women today.

Meet the Female Chauvinist Pig—the new brand of “empowered woman” who wears the Playboy bunny as a talisman, bares all for Girls Gone Wild, pursues casual sex as if it were a sport, and embraces “raunch culture” wherever she finds it. If male chauvinist pigs of years past thought of women as pieces of meat, Female Chauvinist Pigs of today are doing them one better, making sex objects of other women—and of themselves. They think they’re being brave, they think they’re being funny, but in Female Chauvinist Pigs, Ariel Levy asks if the joke is on them.

In her quest to uncover why this is happening, Levy interviews college women who flash for the cameras on spring break and teens raised on Paris Hilton and breast implants. She examines a culture in which every music video seems to feature a stripper on a pole, the memoirs of porn stars are climbing the bestseller lists, Olympic athletes parade their Brazilian bikini waxes in the pages of Playboy, and thongs are marketed to prepubescent girls. Levy meets the high-powered women who create raunch culture—the new oinking women warriors of the corporate and entertainment worlds who eagerly defend their efforts to be “one of the guys.” And she traces the history of this trend back to conflicts between the women’s movement and the sexual revolution long left unresolved.

Levy pulls apart the myth of the Female Chauvinist Pig and argues that what has come to pass for liberating rebellion is actually a kind of limiting conformity. Irresistibly witty and wickedly intelligent, Female Chauvinist Pigs makes the case that the rise of raunch does not represent how far women have come, it only proves how far they have left to go.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780743284288
Publisher: Free Press
Publication date: 10/03/2006
Pages: 256
Sales rank: 176,615
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.43(h) x 0.70(d)

About the Author

Ariel Levy is a contributing editor at New York magazine. This is her first book.

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Female Chauvinist Pigs: Women and the Rise of Raunch Culture 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 30 reviews.
katiepatrick More than 1 year ago
The main message in this book is that men have stopped degrading women, but women are stuck being submissive due to their lack of respect for themselves and other women. Women should definitely read this book! It is such a shocker as to how we are holding ourselves back! I enjoyed this book because I could relate to it; I only disliked realizing I do many things the book says not to do. I would recommend the book Intercourse who Ariel Levy co wrote, but only to older audiences. Concisely, Levy exposes how women degrade each other, why they do it, and what behaviors need to change to be respected once more. My overall rating is 4/5 stars.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Levy is an outstanding writer (I always buy New York Magazine when I see she has contributed) and this book is extremely entertaining and provocative. She manages to boil a very confusing phenomena (why--for example--would 'how to make love like a porn star' make it to the best seller list and why that isn't such a great thing for women) down to an accessible and even enjoyable read. I highly recommend this book not only for the experience of Levy's writing but it is a great book if you are interested in a provocative discussion. Levy is not and does not claim to be an expert in the 'feminist movement' but that is not the point. What she does provide is an excellent take on the trend of 'raunch culture' (even William Safire thinks so). She takes what many have been puzzling about, does some excellent reporting, and wraps it all together into a comprehensive and cohesive study. I¿m sure this was a very difficult book to write.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Levy offers up an insightful analysis of why we shouldn't feel ashamed if we don't find wearing thong underwear or 'pole dancing' powerful. FINALLY, someone has uncovered and explained why the emperor has no clothes when it come to the phenomena of raunch culture. This book is fantastically witty and important.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I struggle to put my exhilaration into words. Ariel Levy's book was a highly stimulating read. It brought into light many topics and concerns that undoubtedly lie in the minds of many of today's women... and men. Being a young woman about to embark on the collegiate lifestyle, I found the book to be very relevant, but this book is relevant to all of today's women, regardless of where they are in their lives.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This read provides a much-deserved, refreshing b-slap in the faces of the pseudo-femninists who have gang raped the true meaning of 'women's liberation' and 'strong women' for way too long. Finally. It also provides an accurate, deep look at the raunch culture. Perhaps this book can also help some worried parents understand their daughters. At times it seems like a patchwork of different articles and incidents, but this book is worth staying up for until 4:30 in the morning. Highly recommended.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm not sure why this book has gotten so many good reviews and attention. It seems like the author just wrote a few magazine articles and patched them together. There's no real work here, no real analysis, and nothing terribly new. Parts of the book are fun to read, but it's nothing you couldn't get from picking up a magazine or two.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I can see why people like this book Levy writes well and it is easy to read. Reading it is a little like listening to a smart friend rant over a topic she is passionate about. That's a strength at first, but in the end I think it points to the book's failing. There's not much content here that you couldn't get by skimming the newspapers. Levy's opinions are not so unusual or so special as to hide the underlying paucity of the book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I just finished rereading this. I first read it in college, and have recommended it several times to my high school students. This time it struck me what was wrong about it: while the author methodically and eloquently exposes modern femininity's skewed worldview, no solution is offered. As a Bible-believer I would posit that a right view of womanhood can only be gained when one has a right view of self in relation to our Creator, not our culture. John 3.
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